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Open-Ended Responses: A response to a question at the end of a reading passage. Every bullet = one paragraph Should include evidence from the text (a.

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Presentation on theme: "Open-Ended Responses: A response to a question at the end of a reading passage. Every bullet = one paragraph Should include evidence from the text (a."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Open-Ended Responses: A response to a question at the end of a reading passage. Every bullet = one paragraph Should include evidence from the text (a quote) and additional insight. PERSUASIVE WRITING: Includes five paragraphs: Intro, 3 body, conclusion Also includes strong reasons and supporting details to persuade the reader of your opinion.

3 I.Writing: Expository Writing Time:

4 Task: Students will read a quote, adage or universally accessible topic and respond in an educated, thought- provoking essay.

5 Types of Prompts: · Quotes- famous quotations by historians, authors, politicians, etc. Example: “Do not be too timid and squeamish about your actions. All life is an experiment.” · Adages- short, memorable sayings that have great meaning attached. Example: Life is ten percent what happens to you and ninety percent how you react to it. · Universally Accessible Topic- Food for thought that is not attached to curriculum or studies, but rather an idea formed from life experience. Example: Some say that love is the most powerful emotion. Others think love is simply a reaction. “To be or not to be…” “Early to bed, early to rise…” “Harder, better faster, stronger…”

6 1.Aim for a 4-paragraph response (at a minimum) which uses various cohesive devices (think- transitions!). 2.Remember that this is all expository (explanatory) not narrative (telling a story). 3.You will need: an opening and a closing; a well-developed, cohesive, single focus; organization and logical progression 4.You will also need at least two well- developed examples, using vivid details, that directly relate to the prompt.

7 You will see the same set of directions embedded in each prompt: “Using an example from literature, history, science, film, or your own experience or observation, write an essay analyzing…”

8 Let’s Get Organized!

9 Grab the reader’s attention Grab the reader’s attention Copy the quote, adage or topic (put in your own words) Copy the quote, adage or topic (put in your own words) Explain the significance (importance) of the quote Explain the significance (importance) of the quote Thesis statement or main idea Thesis statement or main idea

10  First Body Paragraph  Personal example (2 or 3 )  Text to self  Second Body Paragraph  Make a meaningful connection  Text to self, text to media, text to world  This counts as an ALLUSION (a reference to something outside of the text).  ALWAYS EXPLAIN HOW EACH EXAMPLE RELATES BACK TO THE QUOTE/ADAGE/ OR SITUATION!!!  If there is no meaningful connection then you will not receive higher than a “3” out of 6.

11 Example(s) from your own experience or observation to EXPLAIN the meaning of the quote You will write this as an explanation, not a narration (NO DIALOGUE). Do not be tempted to relive the story; speak about it with an academic voice.

12 Example(s) from literature, history, science, or film. (Text to text, text to world, text to media) · ALLUSION – a reference to something outside the text. (Current event, character in literature, pop culture, historical figure/event, etc.) You can actually study for this part, because themes are UNIVERSAL. Think about some major novels that you have read thus far and/or some historical figures. Figure out what they stand for, what themes they exemplify, and be ready to work that into whatever prompt presents itself.

13 Generate final remarks without introducing brand new examples Unify and Summarize your ideas Restate the meaning or significance of the quote. Identify a moral or lesson we can apply in our own lives in the quote. Remind the audience of your main point / thesis Use a thought-provoking question/ statement/ clincher (should connect back to your introduction)

14  Is there a MORAL or a lesson learned from this writing prompt/quote?  How can we apply this lesson in our lives- be specific and detailed  Restate the writing prompt/quote and its meaning.

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16  To receive a high score, you must include compositional risks such as figurative language, literary devices, and sophisticated vocabulary.

17  The following are examples of figurative language and literary devices:

18 Language that appeals to the senses. Descriptions of people or objects stated in terms of our senses. Sight Hearing Touch Taste Smell

19 A figure of speech which involves a direct comparison between two unlike things, usually with the words like or as. Example: The muscles on his brawny arms are as strong as iron bands. A figure of speech which involves a direct comparison between two unlike things, usually with the words like or as. Example: The muscles on his brawny arms are as strong as iron bands.

20 A figure of speech which involves an implied comparison between two relatively unlike things using a form of be. The comparison is not announced by like or as. Example: The road was a ribbon wrapping through the desolate desert. A figure of speech which involves an implied comparison between two relatively unlike things using a form of be. The comparison is not announced by like or as. Example: The road was a ribbon wrapping through the desolate desert.

21 A figure of speech which gives the qualities of a person to an animal, an object, or an idea. Example: “The wind screamed its fury as it pushed us down the road with the strength of a bull.” The wind cannot yell. Only a living thing can yell.

22 Joyet Examples: The sleeping water reflected the evening sky. Humidity breathed in the girl's face and ran its greasy fingers through her hair. The tree arrested the oncoming car. Examples: The sleeping water reflected the evening sky. Humidity breathed in the girl's face and ran its greasy fingers through her hair. The tree arrested the oncoming car.

23 The use of words that mimic sounds. Example: The firecracker made a loud ka-boom!

24 Repeated consonant sounds occurring at the beginning of words or within words. Example: She was wide-eyed and wondering while she waited for Walter to waken. Repeated consonant sounds occurring at the beginning of words or within words. Example: She was wide-eyed and wondering while she waited for Walter to waken.

25 An exaggerated statement used to heighten effect. It is not used to mislead the reader, but to emphasize a point. Example: She’s said so on several million occasions.

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27  Use real-life examples: Personal examples have to be plausible (believable) and significant (important)!  ALL EXAMPLES must be connected to the quote/adage/situation!  Be sure to “quote” words from the quote/adage/or situation.  Check your essay for mistakes in: capitalization, punctuation, spelling, and complete sentences!  Use transition words!  You must have an introduction and conclusion!  WRITE MORE THAN YOU THINK YOU NEED!!

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29 “We should behave to our friends as we would wish our friends to behave to us.” – Aristotle “ I have learned that success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome while trying to succeed.” – Booker T. Washington “ Angels can fly because they take themselves lightly.” - Unknown

30 “Every problem is an opportunity in disguise” – Unknown “ Fall seven times, stand up the eighth time.” – Japanese proverb “ Whatever you can do or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it.” – Johann Wolfgang Goethe


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