Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Unit 4Unit 4 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 1 Unit 4. Side by Side: Principles of UD and UDI.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Unit 4Unit 4 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 1 Unit 4. Side by Side: Principles of UD and UDI."— Presentation transcript:

1 Unit 4Unit 4 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 1 Unit 4. Side by Side: Principles of UD and UDI

2 Unit 4Unit 4 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 2 Principle One: Equitable Use Instruction is designed to be useful to and accessible by people with diverse abilities. The design is useful and marketable to people with diverse abilities. UDI Example (bottom): course materials accessible online. UD Example (top): automatic door

3 Unit 4Unit 4 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 3 Principle Two: Flexibility in Use Instruction is designed to accommodate a wide range of individual abilities. The design accommodates a wide range of individual preferences and abilities. UD Example (top): right and left-handed scissors UDI Example (bottom): lecture notes presented in both slides and handouts

4 Unit 4Unit 4 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 4 Principle Three: Simple and Intuitive Use of the design is easy to understand, regardless of the user’s experience, knowledge, language skills, or current concentration level. Principle Three: Simple and Intuitive Instruction is designed in a straightforward and predictable manner regardless of the user’s experience, knowledge, language, or current concentration level. UD Example (top): chair assembly diagram UDI Example (bottom): concept map

5 Unit 4Unit 4 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 5 Principle Four: Perceptible Information Instruction is designed so that necessary information is communicated effectively to the user, regardless of ambient conditions or the user’s sensory abilities. The design communicates necessary information effectively to the user, regardless of ambient conditions or the user’s sensory abilities. UD Example (top) : “talking” thermometer with large numerals UDI Example (bottom): book and CD formats for college textbook.

6 Unit 4Unit 4 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 6 Principle Five: Tolerance for Error Instruction anticipates variation in individual student learning pace and prerequisite skills. The design minimizes hazards and the adverse consequences of accidental or unintended actions. UD Example (top) : “Undo” button in computer program UDI Example (bottom): computer shows multiple drafts of student’s writing project.

7 Unit 4Unit 4 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 7 Principle Six: Low Physical Effort Instruction is designed to minimize nonessential physical effort in order to allow maximum attention to learning. The design can be used efficiently and comfortably and with a minimum of fatigue. UD Example (top): door opener designed as a lever UDI Example (bottom): student using laptop computer to take class notes

8 Unit 4Unit 4 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 8 Principle Seven: Size and Space for Approach and Use Appropriate size and space is provided for approach, reach, manipulation, and use regardless of user’s body size, posture, or mobility. Principle Seven: Size and Space for Approach and Use Instruction is designed with consideration for appropriate size and space for approach, reach, manipulation, and use regardless of student’s body size, posture, mobility and communication needs. UD Example (top): wheelchair- accessible subway turnstile UDI Example (bottom): wheelchair- accessible chemistry lab station.

9 Unit 4Unit 4 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 9 UDI Principle Eight: A Community of Learners The instructional environment promotes interaction and communication between students and among students and faculty. Example: students working in collaborative group

10 Unit 4Unit 4 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 10 UDI Principle Nine: Instructional Climate Instruction is designed to be welcoming and inclusive. High expectations are espoused for all students. Example: student and instructor discussing a project

11 Unit 4Unit 4 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 11 References Scott, S.S., McGuire, J.M., & Foley, T.E. (2003). Universal Design for Instruction: A framework for anticipating and responding to disability and other diverse learning needs in the college classroom. Equity and Excellence in Education, 36, The Center for Universal Design. (1997). Principles of Universal Design version 2.0. Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Sate University. Retrieved April 28, 2004, from: Note Please note that the Principles of Universal Design address only universally usable design, while the practice of design involves more than consideration for usability. Designers must also incorporate other considerations such as economic, engineering, cultural, gender, and environmental concerns in their design processes. These Principles offer designers guidance to better integrate features that meet the needs of as many users as possible. Compiled by advocates of Universal Design, listed in alphabetical order: Bettye Rose Connell, Mike Jones, Ron Mace, Jim Mueller, Abir Mullick, Elaine Ostroff, Jon Sanford, Ed Steinfeld, Molly Story, and Greg Vanderheiden

12 Unit 4Unit 4 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 12 Visit these web sites for further information about: Universal Design The Center for Universal Design at North Carolina State University Examples of instructional products that exemplify the Principles of UDI Facultyware, the Universal Design for Instruction Project web site. s.cfm

13 Unit 4Unit 4 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 13 Visit these web sites for further information about: The UDI Project of the Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability at the University of Connecticut htm htm The Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability at the University of Connecticut


Download ppt "Unit 4Unit 4 Center on Postsecondary Education and Disability, University of Connecticut, UDI Project 1 Unit 4. Side by Side: Principles of UD and UDI."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google