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TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 1 Management and Leadership in Dental Public Health.

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Presentation on theme: "TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 1 Management and Leadership in Dental Public Health."— Presentation transcript:

1 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 1 Management and Leadership in Dental Public Health

2 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 2 Outline Difference between management and leadership Management tools Leadership and change Organizational change

3 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 3 Management vs Leadership There are good managers who are not innovative leaders; they are just good status quo leaders Leaders must be good managers; but to be a great leader requires a whole set of skills and experiences

4 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 4 Management

5 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 5

6 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 6 Management Improve performance against agency mission Win over stakeholders Create a roadmap –Identify performance objectives –Set priorities –Roll out the change program Take a comprehensive approach

7 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 7 Team members Hiring –The most difficult process –Heavy price for failure

8 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 8 Enemies of Trust Inconsistent messages Inconsistent standards False feedback Failure to trust others ‘Elephant in the parlor’ Rumors

9 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 9

10 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 10 On the folly of rewarding A, while hoping for B. Kerr S. Academy of Management Executives 1995;9:7-14. –Whether dealing with monkeys, rats, or human beings, it is hardly controversial to state that most organisms seek information concerning what activities are rewarded, and then seek to do those things, often to the virtual exclusion of activities not rewarded.

11 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 11 Leadership

12 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 12 Vision There is a process for developing vision. An understanding of the environment and defining of the problems facing an organization are prerequisites for developing a realistic and direct vision.

13 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 13 Leadership from the trench Leadership, like swimming, cannot be learned by reading about it. Henry Mintzberg

14 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 14 Failure is a Prerequisite Many of life's failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up. Thomas Edison

15 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 15 Accuracy does not matter, all the time To achieve the impossible,one must think of the absurd; to look where everyone else has looked, but to see what no else has seen. Unknown

16 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 16 Resiliency in Organizations The middle of every successful project looks like a disaster. Rosabeth Moss Cantor

17 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 17 Management and Leadership Introducing challenges that the culture cannot address All players participate in planning Information sharing Making adversaries stakeholders, building relationships, and making positive political strategies

18 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 18 From Good to Great James Collins

19 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 19

20 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 20 From Good to Great Level 5 Leadership –No ego –No self-interest –Humility –Professional will and unwavering resolve –Fanatically driven, infected with an incurable need to produce sustained results –Diligence (plow horse rather than a show horse) –When things go wrong they look in the mirror and blame themselves –Success is credited to others

21 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 21 Mode of Operation Sustaining Disruptive – Personal computers – Cell phone – Microwave oven – Airline travel

22 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 22 Disruptive Mid-level providers ART Implants Bio-regeneration Evidence-based dentistry Online classes Individual insurance

23 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 23 Leadership Pitfalls Not communicating directly and clearly the plan for change Not defining realistic results and adhering to them Telling people what to do Time management Organizational culture

24 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 24 Organizational Change

25 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 25 Change (Fishman. Fast Company April-May 1997;64-73.) You cannot change an organization without changing yourself. –In any change effort, the first person to change is you.

26 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 26 Choosing Strategy for Change (Kotter JP, Schlesinger LA. HBR March-April 1979) –It must be considered that there is nothing more difficult to carry out, nor more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to handle, than to initiate a new order of things. Machiavelli, The Prince

27 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 27 Choosing Strategy for Change (Kotter JP, Schlesinger LA. HBR March-April 1979) An acceleration of the rate of change will result in an increasing need for reorganization. Reorganization is usually feared because it means disturbing the status quo, a threat to people’s vested interests in their jobs, and an upset to established ways of doing things. –For these reasons, needed reorganization is often deferred, with a resulting loss in effectiveness and an increase in costs.

28 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 28 Choosing Strategy for Change (Kotter JP, Schlesinger LA. HBR March-April 1979) –Diagnosing resistance All people experience emotional turmoil Four reasons –Desire not to lose something of value –Misunderstanding of the change and its implications –Belief that the change does not make sense for the organization –Low tolerance for change

29 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 29 Choosing Strategy for Change (Kotter JP, Schlesinger LA. HBR March-April 1979) –Dealing with resistance Education and communication Participation and involvement Facilitation and support Negotiation and agreement Manipulation and co-optation Explicit or implicit coercion

30 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 30 Change requires Chaos A former 3M CEO ordered a young employee named Richard Drew to abandon a project that the CEO insisted would never work. Drew disregarded the order and went on to invent masking tape, one of 3M’s breakthrough products. Drew’s perseverance also laid the foundation form 3M’s defining product: Scotch tape.

31 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 31 Change is a Process Defining change as a process has a major advantage in implementing any change plan. Single change acts tend to fail and, hence, lead to skepticism. A process of change by contract portrays a journey with certainties and uncertainties, benefits and risks, and successes and setbacks.

32 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 32 Change and Personal Gain You cannot change others unless they benefit from the change.

33 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 33 Organizational Culture

34 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 34 Slide 34 is deleted

35 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 35 It is about culture Leaders don’t create value; they create the culture, competencies, and organizational practices that produce value. Leaders are biased towards types of leadership and typically employ practices that reflect their bias, not necessarily the needs of the situation. HOW your organization operates determines WHAT it creates. –Initiatives often need to be managed differently depending on the requirements of each stage. Every leader needs to develop multi-tasking skills because they must add value in a variety of situations contiguously. Every leader needs to surround themselves with colleagues who have diverse perspectives.

36 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 36 Implementing Change ( HBR April 1991;1-12) Ten Commandments 1.Analyze the organization and its need for change 2.Create a shared vision and common direction 3.Separate from the past 4.Create a sense of urgency 5.Support a strong leader role 6.Line up political sponsorship 7.Craft an implementation plan 8.Develop enabling structures 9.Communicate, involve people, and be honest 10.Reinforce and institutionalize change

37 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 37 Organizational Change 1.GIdentify any significant changes or developments in the organization’s external environment by examining customer expectations, competitor strengths, best- in-class peers, and industry trends. 2.OConduct a preliminary analysis of the organization’s internal environment in terms of its capabilities, competencies, and weaknesses. 3.DDetermine whether change is necessary and, if so, estimate the level and degree of change required. 4.JShare data on the organization’s environments with key internal stakeholders to acquire their perspectives, promote understanding, assess their support, and build a sense of urgency for change. 5.QAssemble a diverse committee whose members are powerful, credible, and willing to work together to define and lead organizational change. 6.AConduct a thorough assessment of the organization’s resources and design, including its strategies, structures, systems, and culture. 7.LDevelop a shared vision for change that is clear, challenging, feasible, and universally appealing. 8.NDevelop a general strategy for attaining the vision for change that identifies the major initiatives, themes, or priorities. 9.CCommunicate the vision and strategy for change, build consensus, and model desired behaviors.

38 TEMPLE UNIVERSITY KORNBERG SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 38 Organizational Change 10.FDirect corporate resources to support the attainment of the vision by aligning structures, systems, and policies; establishing mechanisms for integration and feedback; providing training; and dealing with resistance. 11.PWithin units, establish specific objectives that will promote quick wins and move the organization toward its vision. 12.HIdentify and implement nontraditional processes, new ways of managing, or technical innovations to attain unit-level objectives. 13.KMonitor the implementation process and encourage feedback from managers and employees on what is and is not working. 14.ERefine the implementation process, keep people informed of the progress made by units, and visibly recognize and reward those who exemplify desired behaviors and contribute to the attainment of objectives. 15.MSustain and expand the use of processes, practices, and technologies that contribute most to unit-level improvements through training, communicating, and appropriate adjustments to structures, systems, and policies. 16.BEvaluate the organizational change process to ascertain whether it produced the desired results and to document the lessons learned. 17.IEstablish mechanisms to maintain the gains realized from the organizational change process and to promote future learning and adaptation.


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