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Setting & Figurative Language. Va Va Va Voom Vivid Verbs Words are all an author can use to create images & events in the reader’s mind. Verbs are especially.

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Presentation on theme: "Setting & Figurative Language. Va Va Va Voom Vivid Verbs Words are all an author can use to create images & events in the reader’s mind. Verbs are especially."— Presentation transcript:

1 Setting & Figurative Language

2 Va Va Va Voom Vivid Verbs Words are all an author can use to create images & events in the reader’s mind. Verbs are especially useful because they help the reader to picture the action. Y_RGA&feature=relatedhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnzY8w Y_RGA&feature=related EnXfo&feature=relatedhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qEBy4x EnXfo&feature=related

3 Examples Almost immediately, a bullet flattened itself against the parapet of the roof. Than taking out his field dressing, he ripped open the packet with his knife. Why is the 1 st ex. more vivid than simple writing “…a bullet hit the parapet of the roof”? What does “ripped” in the 2 nd ex. Tell you about the state of the sniper’s mind?

4 Points to Remember 1.Setting: The background against which a story takes place. 2.http://www.youtube.com/results?search_ query=the+book+of+eli&aq=fhttp://www.youtube.com/results?search_ query=the+book+of+eli&aq=f

5 Points to Remember 1.Setting: The background against which a story takes place 2. Setting is often conveyed by appealing to the 5 senses (i.e. sight, smell, touch, taste, and hearing)

6 I quitted my seat, and walked on, although the darkness and storm increased every minute, and the thunder burst with a terrific crash over my head. It was echoed from the Juras and the Alps of Savoy; vivid flashes of lightning dazzled my eyes, illuminating the lake, making it appear like a vast sheet of fire; then for an instant everything seemed of a pitchy darkness, until the eye recovered itself from the preceding flash.

7 Forest

8 Points to Remember 1.Setting: The background against which a story takes place 2. Setting is often conveyed by appealing to the 5 senses (i.e. sight, smell, touch, taste, and hearing) 3. Setting also includes such factors as geographical location, placement of physical objects, and the time period in which the action occurs.

9 Points to Remember 1.Setting: The background against which a story takes place 2.Setting is often conveyed by appealing to the 5 senses (i.e. sight, smell, touch, taste, and hearing) 3.Setting also includes such factors as geographical location, placement of physical objects, and the time period in which the action occurs. 4.The emotional environment of characters can also be used to analyze setting (religious, social, political, etc.)

10 Point-Proof-Comment Point: Make an assertion that you will defend. Proof: Introduce a quotation(s) or an example(s) to help prove your point. The proof you provide should EXEMPLIFY the point you are trying to make. Note: Don’t use proof that is irrelevant. Comment: Discuss how your quotation(s)/example(s) supports your point. Don’t assume that your audience will understand.

11 For example (sorry Leafs fans) Fans of the Toronto Maple Leafs are certifiably insane. According to Albert Einstein, the definition of insanity is “doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results”. This definition applies to Leafs fans because most of them engage in the same rituals year after year believing that their expression of loyalty and dedication will one day bring about the end of the 42 year-old Stanley Cup drought. Not only do these fans shake the dust off of their old, tattered Maple Leafs’ jerseys every October and park themselves in front of their television sets with a sense of anticipation that “this year’s team” will be the one to do it, but they also continue to attend (and sell-out) games to show their support for a team that (to any sane individual) is clearly destined to finish among the bottom-dwellers of the league...

12 Examples from: “The Sniper” Almost immediately, a bullet flattened itself against the parapet of the roof. Than taking out his field dressing, he ripped open the packet with his knife. –Why is the 1 st ex. more vivid than simple writing “…a bullet hit the parapet of the roof”? –What does “ripped” in the 2 nd ex. Tell you about the state of the sniper’s mind?

13 Figurative Language Refers to words, and groups of words that exaggerate or alter the usual meanings of the component words. Figurative language may involve analogy to similar concepts or other contexts and may involve exaggerations. These alterations result in figures of speech.

14 Figurative Languae: Example “The ground is thirsty.” The word ground has literal meaning, but the ground is not alive and therefore neither needs to drink nor feels thirst. Readers immediately reject a literal interpretation and confidently interpret the words to mean “The ground is dry.”

15 Imagery Refers to the forming of mental images, figures or likenesses of things. It is the use of language to represent actions, persons, objects and ideas descriptively. The key is to appeal to and stimulate specific senses, usually visual.

16 Diction Refers to the writer’s distinctive vocabulary choice.


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