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Core Value: Communication  Tribunal of 5 judges  At La Force, 23 names were called for their trial, but only 20 responded when their names were called.

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Presentation on theme: "Core Value: Communication  Tribunal of 5 judges  At La Force, 23 names were called for their trial, but only 20 responded when their names were called."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Core Value: Communication

3  Tribunal of 5 judges  At La Force, 23 names were called for their trial, but only 20 responded when their names were called because 2 had already been sent to the guillotine and one died waiting.  Before Darnay’s trial, “15 prisoners were put the bar…All the fifteen were condemned, and the trials of the whole occupied an hour and a half… that is plenty of time for justice to be served- wait how many minutes is that per trial?

4 Darnay examines the courtroom as his name is called. But “Looking at the jury and the turbulent audience, he might have thought that the usual order of things was reversed, and that the felons were trying the honest men.” What does Darnay mean by this? Men and women were armed. Some ate and drank as well as knitted. In particular, there was one woman knitting and a man neared her… Defarge.

5 Doctor Manette sat near the president. Mr. Lorry was also there as Charles’s charges were explained:

6 President questions him and the debate whether Charles is an emigrant (a person who leaves their own country to settle permanently in another.) Darnay explains that he is not an emigrant “in the sense of spirit of the law… Because he had voluntarily relinquished a title that was distasteful to him, and had left his country– he submitted before the word emigrant in the present acceptation by the tribunal was in use– to live by his own industry in England, rather than on the industry of the overladen people of France.” Why isn’t Darnay an ‘emigrant’?

7 Explains that he has two witnesses: Gabelle and Dr. Manette, the mention of Dr. Manette’s name gets the crowd whispering and some crying. The crowd is easily swayed. The president wants to know why he had returned to France now instead of before: Darnay explains that he had employment in England as a French tutor, which he could not find in France. However, when he received Gabelle’s letter he knew that he needed to return since Gabelle’s life was in danger because of absence. Dr. Manette has made sure Gabelle’s letter was there.

8 Dr. Manette takes the stand… He testifies that Charles Darnay was always faithful to him and had no favor with aristocratic government in England. In fact he was tried for treason for supporting the French government as a friend to the United States (enemy to England). After this, the jury called for a vote and verbally voted in Charles’s favor and President declared him free.

9 “No sooner was the acquittal pronounced than tears were shed as freely as blood at another time, and such fraternal embraces were bestowed upon the prisoner by as many of both sexes as could rush at him, that after his long and unwholesome confinement, he was in danger of fainting from exhausting…

10 However, trials kept going and 5 more were sentenced to death before Darnay left… He searched the crowd for two people that had been at his trial but they weren’t there. Who were those two people? Why would Darnay be search for them?

11 Crowd carried Darnay home in a chair (car of triumph), but it felt surreal to Darnay and at times he thought he was in a cart going to the guillotine. Dr. Manette had gone ahead to warn Lucie. Lucie and Darnay reunite and the crowd dances, breaking into Carmagnole They carry off a young girl as the Goddess of Liberty. What is the significance of this?

12 Darnay carries Lucie upstairs, and they reunite, but he tells her to thank her father for his life.

13 Lucie goes and rests her head on her father chest, grateful to him. This scene mirrors another one in the novel, but this time the father is of use to the daughter. When else did we see a scene like this?

14 CHAPTER 7: A KNOCK AT THE DOOR

15 He is saved… “I have saved him.” It was not another of the dreams in which he had often come back; he was really here. And yet his wife trembled, and a vague but heavy fear was upon her.

16 “All the air was so thick and dark, the people were so passionately revengeful and fitful, the innocent were so constantly put to death on vague suspicion and black malice…” Lucie still worries that she will lose Charles. Why is she still worried? Her husband is safe and living at home.

17 Dr. Manette restored! “No garret, no shoemaking, no One Hundred and Five, North Tower, now! He had accomplished the task he had set himself, his promise was redeemed he had saved Charles. Let all lean upon him.”

18 Every door had to have the names of the inhabitants listed on it. So Charles Evremonde was added, but also Jerry Cruncher, who spent more time with them that Mr. Lorry. Why would they have to have their names on the door? Alexander Manette Charles Evremonde Lucie Evremonde Miss Pross Jerry Cruncher

19 Every night Miss Pross and Cruncher would go out to get supplies for the home, but they would buy as little as they could. Why?

20 Miss Pross requests to ask Dr. Manette one question, but before she does she goes on about how she’s had enough that liberty: “the short and the long of it is, that I am a subject of His Most Gracious Majesty King George the Third.” Miss Pross curtsied at the name. “And as such, my maxim is, Confound their politics, Frustrate their knavish (deceitful) tricks, On him our hopes we fix, God save the King!”

21 Miss Pross has a question… Miss Pross refers to the revolutionaries as being “Midnight, Murder, and Mischief” What literary device is that? She then asks Dr. Manette her question, “Is there any prospect, yet, of our getting out of this place.” What is Dr. Manette’s response? Why?

22 Miss Pross responds in typical English fashion, “We must hold up our heads and fight low,” adding “as my brother Solomon used to say.” She does adore her brother Solomon. Where has he been all of these years though…

23 Miss Pross and Cruncher leave the family sitting around the fire with little Lucie by her grandfather. He is telling her a story… Once upon a time… “There was a great and powerful fairy who had opened a prison-wall and let out a captive who had once done the fairy a service.” Hm… a prison wall- captive set free. This story sounds familiar? What does it remind us of? Once upon a time… “There was a great and powerful fairy who had opened a prison-wall and let out a captive who had once done the fairy a service.” Hm… a prison wall- captive set free. This story sounds familiar? What does it remind us of? Lucie was also listening to the story and was at ease more than she had been in a long time…

24 “What is that?” Lucie cried suddenly. Her father calms her and tells her she’s being jumpy, but Lucie is pale and remarks that she had “heard strange feet upon the stairs.” “My love, the staircase is as still as death.” Knowing what happens in the rest of the chapter, what literary device is this an example of?

25 Lucie begs her father not to answer the door. She tells him that they have come for Charles and they must hide him, but Dr. Manette assures her, “I have saved him. What weakness is this, my dear! Let me go to the door.”

26  Four men in red caps enter and tell Charles, “I saw you before the Tribunal to-day. You are again the prisoner of the Republic.”  Darnay wants to know why, but the soldier responds that he will be summoned tomorrow and know.  Dr. Manette steps in and asks to know why, using his reputation in hope to get some answer.

27 Questions to Consider: So the Republic goes before everything… Is this ironic considering why the Republic was originally formed. What does the Republic stand for?

28 Questions to Consider: Why is “you” italicized? Why does the St. Antoine soldier say, “Now, I am dumb” when Dr. Manette does not know who the third person to denounce Charles was? Why would Madame Defarge let Charles go free only to arrest him again? Dr. Manette asks to know who denounced Charles. A soldier from St. Antoine responds, “Well! Truly it is against rule. But he is denounced—and gravely– by the Citizen and Citizeness Defarge. And by one other.” “What other?” “Do you ask, Citizen Doctor?” “Yes.” “Then,” said he of St. Antoine, with a strange look, “you will be answered tomorrow. Now, I am dumb.” Dr. Manette asks to know who denounced Charles. A soldier from St. Antoine responds, “Well! Truly it is against rule. But he is denounced—and gravely– by the Citizen and Citizeness Defarge. And by one other.” “What other?” “Do you ask, Citizen Doctor?” “Yes.” “Then,” said he of St. Antoine, with a strange look, “you will be answered tomorrow. Now, I am dumb.”

29 In-Class Quiz Chapter 8 As you listen to the audio, answer the questions on your quiz. After the quiz, fill out Carton’s Deck of Cards

30 Quiz Chapters 9-11 See Handout

31 Chapter 8:  Summary: Chapter 8: A Hand at Cards  Meanwhile, Jerry Cruncher and Miss Pross discover Miss Pross’s long-lost brother, Solomon, in a wine shop. Solomon scolds his sister for making a scene over their reunion. He cannot afford to be identified because he is working as a spy for the Republic. Meanwhile, Cruncher recognizes Solomon as the witness who accused Darnay of treason during his trial in England thirteen years earlier. He struggles to remember the man’s name until Sydney Carton, who suddenly appears behind them, provides it: Barsad. Carton states that he has been in Paris for a day and has been lying low until he could be useful. He threatens to reveal Barsad’s true identity to the revolutionaries unless the spy accompanies him to Tellson’s. Upon arriving at Tellson’s, Carton informs Mr. Lorry and Jerry Cruncher that Darnay has been arrested again; he overheard Barsad discussing the news in a bar. Carton has a plan to help Darnay, should he be convicted, and he threatens to expose Barsad as an English spy should Barsad fail to cooperate. Carton reveals that he has seen Barsad conversing with Roger Cly, a known English spy. When Barsad counters that Cly is dead and presents the certificate of burial, Cruncher disproves the story by asserting that Cly’s coffin contained only stones and dirt. Though Cruncher is unwilling to explain how he knows these details, Carton takes him at his word and again threatens to expose Barsad as an enemy of the Republic. Barsad finally gives in and agrees to help Carton with his secret plan. 

32 Summary: Chapter 9: The Game Made Lorry scolds Cruncher for leading a secret life (grave-robbing) outside his job at Tellson’s. Cruncher hints that there may be many doctors involved in grave-robbing who bank at Tellson’s. Cruncher then makes amends, saying that if Lorry will let young Jerry Cruncher inherit his own duties at the bank, he himself will become a gravedigger to make up for all the graves that he has “un-dug.” After Barsad leaves, Carton tells Lorry and Cruncher that he has arranged a time to visit Darnay before his imminent execution. Carton reflects that a human being who has not secured the love of another has wasted his life, and Lorry agrees. That night, as he wanders the streets of Paris, Carton thinks of Lucie. He enters a chemist’s shop and buys a mysterious substance. The words spoken by the priest at his father’s funeral echo through his mind: “I am the resurrection and the life, saith the Lord: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: and whosoever liveth and believeth in me, shall never die.” Carton helps a small girl across the muddy street, and she gives him a kiss. The priest’s words echo again in his mind. He wanders until sunrise, then makes his way to the courthouse for Darnay’s trial. The judge names Darnay’s accusers: the Defarges and Doctor Manette. Manette reacts with shock and denies having ever denounced Darnay. Defarge then takes the stand and speaks of a letter that he found, hidden in 105 North Tower of the Bastille.  Summary: Chapter 9: The Game Made Lorry scolds Cruncher for leading a secret life (grave-robbing) outside his job at Tellson’s. Cruncher hints that there may be many doctors involved in grave-robbing who bank at Tellson’s. Cruncher then makes amends, saying that if Lorry will let young Jerry Cruncher inherit his own duties at the bank, he himself will become a gravedigger to make up for all the graves that he has “un-dug.” After Barsad leaves, Carton tells Lorry and Cruncher that he has arranged a time to visit Darnay before his imminent execution. Carton reflects that a human being who has not secured the love of another has wasted his life, and Lorry agrees. That night, as he wanders the streets of Paris, Carton thinks of Lucie. He enters a chemist’s shop and buys a mysterious substance. The words spoken by the priest at his father’s funeral echo through his mind: “I am the resurrection and the life, saith the Lord: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: and whosoever liveth and believeth in me, shall never die.” Carton helps a small girl across the muddy street, and she gives him a kiss. The priest’s words echo again in his mind. He wanders until sunrise, then makes his way to the courthouse for Darnay’s trial. The judge names Darnay’s accusers: the Defarges and Doctor Manette. Manette reacts with shock and denies having ever denounced Darnay. Defarge then takes the stand and speaks of a letter that he found, hidden in 105 North Tower of the Bastille. 

33 Activator: 1. In Chapter 10, a letter that Dr. Manette wrote years ago in the Bastille reveals some startling events. Take 5 minutes and outline the events of Dr. Manette’s letter. 2. When does he write the letter? 3. On what date does he begin telling the story within the letter? 4. Why did he go with the two men? Why didn’t he fight back? 5. They took him to their house. What did he find? 6. What does the peasant girl keep repeating? 7. “There was a timid and suppressed woman in attendance (wife of the man downstairs).” Who is she? 8. Who did the two brothers want? What did they do to her husband? 9. What did the boy do with his young sister? 10. The boy says that who should answer for all of the things the Marquis has done? 11. How long did the girl last? 12. Would Dr. Manette’s accept pay? 13. Dr. Manette wrote a letter before his imprisonment, but he was interrupted by a lady. Who was she? What did she want? Who was with her? 14. Who does Dr. Manette denounce at the end of his letter

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35 The courtroom crowd pours into the streets to celebrate Darnay’s condemnation.

36 John Barsad, charged with ushering Darnay back to his cell, lets Lucie embrace her husband one last time. Darnay insists that Doctor Manette not blame himself for the trial’s outcome.

37 Darnay is escorted back to his cell to await his execution the following morning. Lucie finally faints and Carton carries her to the carriage, taking her back home.

38 Meet back at 9 o’clock Carton tells Manette to try his influence one last time with the prosecutors and then meet him at Tellson’s, though Lorry feels certain that there is no hope for Darnay, and Carton echoes the sentiment. So why would they tell him to go, if they knew it was helpless.

39 Chapter 12: Darkness Answer the following questions: 1. What is Sydney Carton’s object in going to the wine shop? 2. Why does Carton pretend that he does not understand French very well when he goes to the wine shop? 3. Explain why Defarge and his wife have different opinions on what should happen to Darnay’s family. 4. What effect does his unsuccessful attempt to help Charles have on Doctor Manette? 5. What traveling arrangements have been made? 6. What directions did Sydney Carton give to Mr. Lorry? 7. Why do you think Carton “breathed a blessing… and a Farewell” as he looked up at Lucie’s window? 8. What do you think Sydney Carton plans to do?

40 Chapter 13: Fifty-Two ture=related ature=related eature=related ature=related

41 Quiz Chapters What times was Dr. Manette supposed to be back at Tellson’s to meet with Carton and Mr. Lorry? 2. Dr. Manette returns to the house late and has been unsuccessful in helping Charles. What effect has it had on him? 3. What does Carton give Mr. Lorry? 4. Charles is writing letters at the beginning of the chapter 13. Who does he write to (more than one person)? 5. What does Carton do to Darnay while he is writing? 6. Who does Carton meet on his way to the guillotine? 7. What does the chapter title “Fifty-two” mean? 8. Madame Defarge is unsure whether to add Dr. Manette to her knitting or death list, but Jacques 3 sways her saying it would be what? 9. What are the two promises that Jerry makes to Miss Pross? 10. What happens to Miss Pross?

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43 Chapter 6: What is going on here?

44 Chapter 8: What’s going here? Mr. Lorry Carton Basard Cruncher

45 Chapter 9: What is going on?

46 Chapter 9: What is going on here? Lucie

47 Chapter 10: Who is this? What is going on?

48 What is going on here? "Twice he put his hand to the wound in his breast, and with his forefinger drew a cross in the air" (p. 152) In the story-within-a story, Dr. Manette's epistolary (letter) denunciation of the St. Evrémonde brothers, his patient (Terese Defarge's brother, in fact), dying, damns the twin aristocrats for crimes against him and his family in the year 1757.

49 Chapter 11: What is going on here?

50 Some people believe that entire groups or societies bear the responsibility for the actions of individual members of that society. Madame Defarge, in deciding to target all the members of the Evrémonde family—even those who took no part in the cruelties of the past—shows she believes in collective guilt. What do you think? In your group, discuss the question of collective guilt. Examine Madame Defarge’s reasoning for assigning guilt to Darnay, Lucie, and even little Lucie, supporting your argument with examples from the text. Then, discuss the question as it applies to societies in real life. Examples you might consider are Germans during the Nazi era, Americans during and after slavery and the displacement of Native Americans, and Bosnians during the “ethnic cleansing” campaigns of the 1990s.

51 DateAssignment Due MondayRead Chapter 15 Book 2 Test Due Tomorrow Review Books 1-3 TuesdayIntroduce Wiki Assignment WednesdayFinal Project Work Day ThursdayFinal Test FridayMob Psychology Essay Due Friday 5/20Bastille Day


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