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Critical Reading Section Reading Comprehension: Purpose and Inference.

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Presentation on theme: "Critical Reading Section Reading Comprehension: Purpose and Inference."— Presentation transcript:

1 Critical Reading Section Reading Comprehension: Purpose and Inference

2 Purpose and Inference Questions To answer these questions, it is important to read the entire passage. It can also be helpful to read the question stems (only! – not the answers!) before reading the passage. These questions move chronologically through the passage and do NOT necessarily increase in difficulty.

3 Purpose Questions These questions will use phrases such as: – the author mentions [blank] in order to... – this part of the passage serves to... Here you must understand the author’s reasoning for using a particular phrase in the context of the passage as a whole

4 Inference Questions These questions will use phrases such as: – the author suggests that... – this part of the passage suggests that... Although the author does not directly state these answers, the clues to reach these conclusions are directly in the passage

5 1. The author mentions Mrs. Mallard’s “heart trouble” (line 1) in order to A. support the doctor’s accurate diagnosis at the end of the story B. set the mood of the story as tragic C. establish both her physical health and her restrained marriage D. characterize the female characters as fragile and submissive E. foreshadow the death of Mr. Mallard on the train

6 1. The author mentions Mrs. Mallard’s “heart trouble” (line 1) in order to (POE) A. support the doctor’s accurate diagnosis at the end of the story B. set the mood of the story as tragic C. establish both her physical health and her restrained marriage D. characterize the female characters as fragile and submissive E. foreshadow the death of Mr. Mallard on the train

7 1. The author mentions Mrs. Mallard’s “heart trouble” (line 1) in order to (POE) A. support the doctor’s accurate diagnosis at the end of the story B. set the mood of the story as tragic C. establish both her physical health and her restrained marriage D. characterize the female characters as fragile and submissive E. foreshadow the death of Mr. Mallard on the train

8 1. The author mentions Mrs. Mallard’s “heart trouble” (line 1) in order to (POE) A. support the doctor’s accurate diagnosis at the end of the story B. set the mood of the story as tragic C. establish both her physical health and her restrained marriage D. characterize the female characters as fragile and submissive E. foreshadow the death of Mr. Mallard on the train

9 1. The author mentions Mrs. Mallard’s “heart trouble” (line 1) in order to A. support the doctor’s accurate diagnosis at the end of the story B. set the mood of the story as tragic C. establish both her physical health and her restrained marriage D. characterize the female characters as fragile and submissive E. foreshadow the death of Mr. Mallard on the train

10 2. As used in line 3, “veiled” most nearly means A. covered B. protected C. roundabout D. exposed E. concealed

11 2. As used in line 3, “veiled” most nearly means A. covered B. protected C. roundabout D. exposed E. concealed (used in the sentence)

12 2. As used in line 3, “veiled” most nearly means A. covered B. protected C. roundabout D. exposed (opposite definition) E. concealed (used in the sentence)

13 2. As used in line 3, “veiled” most nearly means A. covered (common definition) B. protected C. roundabout D. exposed (opposite definition) E. concealed (used in the sentence)

14 2. As used in line 3, “veiled” most nearly means A. covered (common definition) B. protected C. roundabout D. exposed (opposite definition) E. concealed (used in the sentence)

15 3. As used in line 10, “wild abandonment” most nearly means A. restraint B. grief C. lunacy D. defeat E. release

16 3. As used in line 10, “wild abandonment” most nearly means A. restraint (opposite definition) B. grief C. lunacy D. defeat E. release

17 3. As used in line 10, “wild abandonment” most nearly means A. restraint (opposite definition) B. grief C. lunacy (common definition) D. defeat E. release

18 3. As used in line 10, “wild abandonment” most nearly means A. restraint (opposite definition) B. grief C. lunacy (common definition) D. defeat E. release

19 4. The author mentions the “open window” (line 13) in order to A. suggest Louise’s life has been carefree and open B. provide a frame through which Louise views images of freedom C. hint how often she would sit in the armchair and dream of being somewhere else D. serve as her escape from her strained marriage E. foreshadow the oncoming spring rain

20 4. The author mentions the “open window” (line 13) in order to A. suggest Louise’s life has been carefree and open B. provide a frame through which Louise views images of freedom C. hint how often she would sit in the armchair and dream of being somewhere else D. serve as her escape from her strained marriage E. foreshadow the oncoming spring rain

21 4. The author mentions the “open window” (line 13) in order to A. suggest Louise’s life has been carefree and open B. provide a frame through which Louise views images of freedom C. hint how often she would sit in the armchair and dream of being somewhere else (NO PROOF) D. serve as her escape from her strained marriage E. foreshadow the oncoming spring rain

22 4. The author mentions the “open window” (line 13) in order to A. suggest Louise’s life has been carefree and open B. provide a frame through which Louise views images of freedom C. hint how often she would sit in the armchair and dream of being somewhere else (NO PROOF) D. serve as her escape from her strained marriage E. foreshadow the oncoming spring rain

23 4. The author mentions the “open window” (line 13) in order to A. suggest Louise’s life has been carefree and open B. provide a frame through which Louise views images of freedom C. hint how often she would sit in the armchair and dream of being somewhere else D. serve as her escape from her strained marriage E. foreshadow the oncoming spring rain

24 5. As used in line 18, “crying” most nearly means A. weeping B. moaning C. singing D. broadcasting E. selling

25 5. As used in line 18, “crying” most nearly means A. weeping (common definition) B. moaning C. singing D. broadcasting E. selling

26 5. As used in line 18, “crying” most nearly means A. weeping (common definition) B. moaning C. singing (used in the next sentence) D. broadcasting E. selling

27 5. As used in line 18, “crying” most nearly means A. weeping (common definition) B. moaning C. singing (used in the next sentence) D. broadcasting E. selling

28 6. The description of Louise’s “fair, calm face” (line 25) serves to A. characterize her as clear thinking and optimistic of her future B. foreshadow her weak health C. show how childlike and immature her behaviors are D. contrast her fatal, startled reaction to Mr. Mallard’s entrance E. show how two-faced Louise can be

29 6. The description of Louise’s “fair, calm face” (line 25) serves to A. characterize her as clear thinking and optimistic of her future B. foreshadow her weak health C. show how childlike and immature her behaviors are D. contrast her fatal, startled reaction to Mr. Mallard’s entrance E. show how two-faced Louise can be

30 6. The description of Louise’s “fair, calm face” (line 25) serves to A. characterize her as clear thinking and optimistic of her future B. foreshadow her weak health C. show how childlike and immature her behaviors are D. contrast her fatal, startled reaction to Mr. Mallard’s entrance (NO PROOF) E. show how two-faced Louise can be

31 6. The description of Louise’s “fair, calm face” (line 25) serves to A. characterize her as clear thinking and optimistic of her future B. foreshadow her weak health C. show how childlike and immature her behaviors are D. contrast her fatal, startled reaction to Mr. Mallard’s entrance E. show how two-faced Louise can be

32 7. In lines the author suggests that A. Louise fears the uncertainty of her future as a widow B. the opportunity to begin anew is reinvigorating to Louise C. she hated her husband and looks forward to a new life D. the thought of a woman being independent at this time period is trivial E. she has been wanting this new freedom for some time now

33 7. In lines the author suggests that A. Louise fears the uncertainty of her future as a widow B. the opportunity to begin anew is reinvigorating to Louise C. she hated her husband and looks forward to a new life D. the thought of a woman being independent at this time period is trivial E. she has been wanting this new freedom for some time now

34 7. In lines the author suggests that A. Louise fears the uncertainty of her future as a widow B. the opportunity to begin anew is reinvigorating to Louise C. she hated her husband and looks forward to a new life D. the thought of a woman being independent at this time period is trivial E. she has been wanting this new freedom for some time now

35 7. In lines the author suggests that A. Louise fears the uncertainty of her future as a widow B. the opportunity to begin anew is reinvigorating to Louise C. she hated her husband and looks forward to a new life D. the thought of a woman being independent at this time period is trivial E. she has been wanting this new freedom for some time now

36 7. In lines the author suggests that A. Louise fears the uncertainty of her future as a widow B. the opportunity to begin anew is reinvigorating to Louise C. she hated her husband and looks forward to a new life D. the thought of a woman being independent at this time period is trivial E. she has been wanting this new freedom for some time now

37 8. In line 71 the author suggests that A. the doctors believe that Louise died of a broken heart B. what kills Louise is the realization that her dreams of a new life are now lost C. Louise truly loved her husband more than the thought of being free without him D. Louise had died from heart failure before her body collapsed down the stairs E. Brently Mallard had not been killed on the train

38 8. In line 71 the author suggests that A. the doctors believe that Louise died of a broken heart B. what kills Louise is the realization that her dreams of a new life are now lost C. Louise truly loved her husband more than the thought of being free without him D. Louise had died from heart failure before her body collapsed down the stairs E. Brently Mallard had not been killed on the train (FACT not an INFERENCE)

39 8. In line 71 the author suggests that A. the doctors believe that Louise died of a broken heart B. what kills Louise is the realization that her dreams of a new life are now lost C. Louise truly loved her husband more than the thought of being free without him D. Louise had died from heart failure before her body collapsed down the stairs E. Brently Mallard had not been killed on the train (FACT not an INFERENCE)

40 8. In line 71 the author suggests that A. the doctors believe that Louise died of a broken heart B. what kills Louise is the realization that her dreams of a new life are now lost C. Louise truly loved her husband more than the thought of being free without him D. Louise had died from heart failure before her body collapsed down the stairs E. Brently Mallard had not been killed on the train (FACT not an INFERENCE)

41 8. In line 71 the author suggests that A. the doctors believe that Louise died of a broken heart B. what kills Louise is the realization that her dreams of a new life are now lost C. Louise truly loved her husband more than the thought of being free without him D. Louise had died from heart failure before her body collapsed down the stairs E. Brently Mallard had not been killed on the train


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