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Trends in Women’s Philanthropy Dr. Debra Mesch Director, Women’s Philanthropy Institute Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University Procura 15 th Anniversary.

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Presentation on theme: "Trends in Women’s Philanthropy Dr. Debra Mesch Director, Women’s Philanthropy Institute Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University Procura 15 th Anniversary."— Presentation transcript:

1 Trends in Women’s Philanthropy Dr. Debra Mesch Director, Women’s Philanthropy Institute Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University Procura 15 th Anniversary Celebration October 25,

2 Women’s Philanthropy Institute at the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University Mission: to further understanding of women’s philanthropy through research, education, and knowledge dissemination Vision: to change the way people think about women and philanthropy  2

3 Changing Role of Women in American Society 3 Women’s philanthropy is shaped by women’s economic position and social roles Education – more schooling to prepare for work Income – women are earning more Structure of family and nature of marital status has changed Number of children has changed

4 RESEARCH MATTERS Gender matters in philanthropy. Men and women have different philanthropic interests different motivations and different philanthropic patterns 4

5 RESEARCH MATTERS Motivations Giving Generational differences Household decision-making 5

6 MOTIVATIONS DIFFER BETWEEN MEN AND WOMEN EMPATHYCARING Concerned feelings for those less fortunate Feeling protective towards others who are taken advantage of Feeling pity for others who are treated unfairly Willing to help others Assisting people in trouble Looking after others or being concerned about others 6

7 MOTIVATIONS – Empathy and Caring RESULTS Males scored significantly LOWER than women on both motives Males significantly LESS LIKELY than women to give to charity NOTE: Research controls for factors that affect philanthropic behavior such as income, race, education, geographic region, marital status, # of children in the family, religious affiliation, and other factors 7

8 WOMEN GIVE 2010 Likelihood of Giving In every income group, female-headed households are MORE LIKELY TO GIVE to charity than male-headed households. 8

9 WOMEN GIVE 2010 Amount Given In every income group except for one, women GIVE MORE than men. 9

10 WOMEN GIVE 2010 Likelihood of giving Female headed households are MORE LIKELY TO GIVE than men in comparable households except for the widow/widower category. 10

11 WOMEN GIVE 2010 Amount given Female headed households GIVE MORE than men in comparable households except for the widow/widower category. 11

12 WOMEN GIVE 2010 T he widow/widower result Both are likely to give Higher percentage than other single- household categories 4 widows to every widower over 55 in US 12

13 Generational differences Are there differences in motives for giving across gender and generation? Greatest – prior to 1924 Silent – Baby Boomers – Generation X – Millennials –

14 Generational Differences - RESULTS Women in all generations scored higher on principles of care ands empathic concerns than men in all generations. Women in all generations have similar motives for giving. Women’s motives differ from those of men. Boomer women are more likely to give and give more than all males. Boomer women give more than other women across generations except for silent generation women (born ). Millennial men are least likely to give to charity. 14

15 WHO DECIDES? Among U.S. households in which donating couples decide how much to give and to what causes, who is the primary decision maker? Husband Wife Both husband and wife The research contained in this section was taken from the Center on Philanthropy Panel Study data,

16 WHO DECIDES? Among U.S. households in which donating couples decide how much to give and to what causes, who is the primary decision maker? Husband 12% Wife 27% Both husband and wife 61% The research contained in this section was taken from the Center on Philanthropy Panel Study data,

17 When the husband decides… …does the wife still have influence? Yes, household giving increases with the wife’s church attendance, and is higher if she is a college graduate The research contained in this section was taken from the Center on Philanthropy Panel Study data,

18 When the wife decides… …does the husband still have influence? Yes, household giving increases with the husband’s church attendance, and is higher if he has more than four years of college education. The research contained in this section was taken from the Center on Philanthropy Panel Study data,

19 When both are involved… More is given than when only the wife is involved; The amount given is sensitive to the husband’s education level generally; The amount given is sensitive to the wife’s education only if she has more than four years of college. The research contained in this section was taken from the Center on Philanthropy Panel Study data,

20 Do Wives & Husbands Think Differently about Giving? The egalitarian: Wives tend to spread their giving across a greater number of charitable activities. The strategist: Men tend to respond more to strategic concerns, such as tax advantages. 20

21 Do Wives & Husbands Give to Different Causes? The nurturer: A household will give more to the needy if the wife decides. In some studies, more to health, education as well. The citizen: A household will give more to neighborhood and community causes if the husband decides. 21

22 Implications of Research How is the research applied to practice? DONORS More reflective From personal to broader picture Builds confidence FUNDRAISERS Understanding context for gender in philanthropy enables more focused approaches to donors YOUR THOUGHTS? 22

23 For More Information Women’s Philanthropy Institute 550 W. North Street, Suite 301 Indianapolis, IN  Women Worldwide Leading through Philanthropy – symposium March 10-11, 2011 Chicago, IL Women and Philanthropy – The Time is Now – self-paced online course 23


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