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Unit II Kansas Arthropods Information. Introduction to Arthropods Insects and spiders belong to a larger Phylum Arthropoda, which means “jointed leg”.

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Presentation on theme: "Unit II Kansas Arthropods Information. Introduction to Arthropods Insects and spiders belong to a larger Phylum Arthropoda, which means “jointed leg”."— Presentation transcript:

1 Unit II Kansas Arthropods Information

2 Introduction to Arthropods Insects and spiders belong to a larger Phylum Arthropoda, which means “jointed leg”. Insects and spiders belong to a larger Phylum Arthropoda, which means “jointed leg”. Insects are characterized by having 6 legs with joints, and 3 body parts: head, thorax and abdomen. Most have either one or two sets of wings. Insects are characterized by having 6 legs with joints, and 3 body parts: head, thorax and abdomen. Most have either one or two sets of wings. Most insects go through various life stages, where they change in form and appearance. There are many variations, but these changes are called “metamorphosis”. Most insects go through various life stages, where they change in form and appearance. There are many variations, but these changes are called “metamorphosis”. Very few insects are harmful to humans or crops. Very few insects are harmful to humans or crops. Many insects are very beneficial, especially the ones that pollinate plants. Many insects are very beneficial, especially the ones that pollinate plants.

3 Arthropods, cont. Spiders are characterized by having 8 legs and 8 eyes. They have two body parts: cephalothorax and abdomen. Spiders are characterized by having 8 legs and 8 eyes. They have two body parts: cephalothorax and abdomen. Identification of most insects is very difficult. Some of the more showy insects, like most of the ones in this unit, are easy to learn the species. Learning which Order insects belong in is the first step to being able to find the species in field guides. Identification of most insects is very difficult. Some of the more showy insects, like most of the ones in this unit, are easy to learn the species. Learning which Order insects belong in is the first step to being able to find the species in field guides.

4 Monarch

5 Monarch Video of Ken Highfill’s class observing Monarch bunch at Baker Wetlands, in Lawrence, KS.

6 Monarch Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies Only migratory butterfly that has a migration similar to birds. Only migratory butterfly that has a migration similar to birds. When they breed, they lay eggs on milkweed plants, and the breeding adults live for about one month. When they breed, they lay eggs on milkweed plants, and the breeding adults live for about one month. About 4 generations are hatched in a summer, and the ones that hatch out in August and September are the ones that will fly to Mexico for the winter, and there they will congregate by the millions, and live for about 8 months. They are not in a breeding state. About 4 generations are hatched in a summer, and the ones that hatch out in August and September are the ones that will fly to Mexico for the winter, and there they will congregate by the millions, and live for about 8 months. They are not in a breeding state. As they fly back north, they breed and die. The next generations continues going farther north, breeding and dying, until the end of the summer and the migratory cycle continues. As they fly back north, they breed and die. The next generations continues going farther north, breeding and dying, until the end of the summer and the migratory cycle continues. Monarch Watch tags the monarchs with special stickers and records the data to keep track of migration. See www.monarchwatch.org for more information. Monarch Watch tags the monarchs with special stickers and records the data to keep track of migration. See www.monarchwatch.org for more information.www.monarchwatch.org

7 Monarch con’t. Monarch butterflies are poisonous (not venomous—you have to eat them to get sick). Monarch butterflies are poisonous (not venomous—you have to eat them to get sick). Their black and orange colors are a warning to would-be predators that they are poisonous. If a bird eats one, it gets sick and throws it up, its heart beats very fast and it remembers those colors and does not eat it again. Their black and orange colors are a warning to would-be predators that they are poisonous. If a bird eats one, it gets sick and throws it up, its heart beats very fast and it remembers those colors and does not eat it again. Monarch caterpillars live on the milkweed plants, which have a cardiac glycoside in the “milk” that is poisonous to most animals. The caterpillars can eat it and not get sick, and that is what makes them poisonous to other predators. Monarch caterpillars live on the milkweed plants, which have a cardiac glycoside in the “milk” that is poisonous to most animals. The caterpillars can eat it and not get sick, and that is what makes them poisonous to other predators.

8 Viceroy Note this black bar across the hind wing. The Monarch does not have this straight line.

9 Viceroy Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies NOT poisonous, but it mimics the monarch butterfly, which provides it protection from predators. NOT poisonous, but it mimics the monarch butterfly, which provides it protection from predators. Note the hind wing of the viceroy—the black cross vein forms a line across the hind wing. The monarch does not have this line. Note the hind wing of the viceroy—the black cross vein forms a line across the hind wing. The monarch does not have this line.

10 Hackberry Butterflies

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12 Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies. Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies. Caterpillars feed on hackberry leaves. Caterpillars feed on hackberry leaves. Butterflies fly from July to September. Butterflies fly from July to September. Often found in huge clouds around puddles of water near hackberry trees. Often found in huge clouds around puddles of water near hackberry trees.

13 Red Admiral

14 Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies. Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies. Not likely to be confused with any other butterfly. Not likely to be confused with any other butterfly. Can be found all across the U.S. in nearly any habitat. Very common. Can be found all across the U.S. in nearly any habitat. Very common.

15 Question Mark

16 This is the “question mark”. Question Mark

17 Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies. Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies. Belongs to a group of butterflies called Commas (also called anglewings), and named for the silvery comma shape on underneath of the hind wing. This species has a “break” in the shape that makes it look more like a question mark. Belongs to a group of butterflies called Commas (also called anglewings), and named for the silvery comma shape on underneath of the hind wing. This species has a “break” in the shape that makes it look more like a question mark. Wide ranging and fairly common in woodland openings. Wide ranging and fairly common in woodland openings. Elms and hackberries are among their host plants. Elms and hackberries are among their host plants.

18 Buckeye

19 Buckeye Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies. Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies. Common in southern regions but familiar across the U.S. Common in southern regions but familiar across the U.S. Favors open habitats. Favors open habitats. Named for large eyespots on the wings. Named for large eyespots on the wings.

20 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

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22 Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies. Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies. One of the most familiar eastern butterflies. One of the most familiar eastern butterflies. Common in forests, along streams and gardens. Common in forests, along streams and gardens. Called a swallowtail because of the two “tails” trailing off of the hindwings. Called a swallowtail because of the two “tails” trailing off of the hindwings.

23 Sulphurs

24 Sulphurs Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies. Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies. Sulphurs in are usually some shade of yellow, orange or white. Sulphurs in are usually some shade of yellow, orange or white. There are several species, and they are challenging to tell apart. There are several species, and they are challenging to tell apart. Perch with closed wings. Perch with closed wings. Often you can see two flying together, around each other going higher in the air—these are often males “fighting”. Often you can see two flying together, around each other going higher in the air—these are often males “fighting”.

25 Fall Webworms

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27 Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies. Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies. Makes large webs across host plant branches in the fall. Makes large webs across host plant branches in the fall. Host plants: walnuts, cottonwood, hickory, mulberry. Host plants: walnuts, cottonwood, hickory, mulberry.

28 Carpenter Ants

29 Order: Hymenoptera, the ants, wasps, and bees. Order: Hymenoptera, the ants, wasps, and bees. Lives in hollow trees and tree limbs. Lives in hollow trees and tree limbs. More likely found in woodland than urban areas. More likely found in woodland than urban areas.

30 Honey Bee

31 Order: Hymenoptera, the ants, wasps, and bees. Order: Hymenoptera, the ants, wasps, and bees. Imported from Europe. Imported from Europe. Well known as a mild-tempered bee. Well known as a mild-tempered bee. This is the bee common to bee keepers. This is the bee common to bee keepers.

32 Grass Spider

33 Order: Araneae, the spiders Order: Araneae, the spiders Common names are grass spider, wolf spider and funnel-web weaver. Common names are grass spider, wolf spider and funnel-web weaver. Makes a flat, dense web with a funnel off- center. Makes a flat, dense web with a funnel off- center. Webs located on ground or heavy brush. Webs located on ground or heavy brush. Typically have two dark bands on abdomen. Typically have two dark bands on abdomen.

34 Wheel Bug

35 Stink Glands

36 Wheel Bug Order: Hemiptera, the true bugs Order: Hemiptera, the true bugs Named for the cog-like wheel on thorax. Named for the cog-like wheel on thorax. Predacious and beneficial Predacious and beneficial Not aggressive towards people, but the bite is extremely painful. Not aggressive towards people, but the bite is extremely painful.

37 Snowberry Clearwing

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39 Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies. Order: Lepidoptera, the moths and butterflies. It is a bumble bee hawk moth that visits flowers in the daytime. It is a bumble bee hawk moth that visits flowers in the daytime. Named for clear section of wing without scales. Named for clear section of wing without scales.

40 Bush Cicada

41 Order: Homoptera, the aphids, leafhoppers, and cicadas Order: Homoptera, the aphids, leafhoppers, and cicadas Incorrectly referred to as locusts (locusts are grasshoppers) Incorrectly referred to as locusts (locusts are grasshoppers) Many species, and adults can be ½ inch long to 2 ½ inches long. Many species, and adults can be ½ inch long to 2 ½ inches long. Their sounds, especially in July and August, are familiar to nearly everyone. Their sounds, especially in July and August, are familiar to nearly everyone. Females can cause damage to some trees, as they lay eggs in the twigs. When the eggs hatch, the nymphs fall to the ground and develop in the soil. They feed on the roots of the host plant. When the emerge, they molt into adults, and their empty skins are common sights for most people. Females can cause damage to some trees, as they lay eggs in the twigs. When the eggs hatch, the nymphs fall to the ground and develop in the soil. They feed on the roots of the host plant. When the emerge, they molt into adults, and their empty skins are common sights for most people. Some species occur every year, while the periodical cicada is also called the 17-year cicada and occurs every 17 years. It last occurred in May, 1998. Some species occur every year, while the periodical cicada is also called the 17-year cicada and occurs every 17 years. It last occurred in May, 1998.

42 Black Widow

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44 Order: Araneae, the spiders Order: Araneae, the spiders A relatively shy spider that typically seeks nesting sites under stones and embankments. A relatively shy spider that typically seeks nesting sites under stones and embankments. Shiny, black spider up to 3/8 inches in length with a red spots above and a red hourglass shape on the underside of their abdomen. Shiny, black spider up to 3/8 inches in length with a red spots above and a red hourglass shape on the underside of their abdomen. Neurotoxic venom causes severe abdominal cramps, pain, nausea, sweating, and trembling. Neurotoxic venom causes severe abdominal cramps, pain, nausea, sweating, and trembling. Rarely causes death except in very small children or the elderly. Rarely causes death except in very small children or the elderly.

45 Garden Spider

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47 Order: Araneae, the spiders Order: Araneae, the spiders Several species of the Argiope genus. Several species of the Argiope genus. Very common in Kansas, especially in late summer and fall. They die in the fall after reproducing. Very common in Kansas, especially in late summer and fall. They die in the fall after reproducing. Quite large and beautifully marked with black, yellow and silvery-white. Quite large and beautifully marked with black, yellow and silvery-white. Webs have a thick, zig-zag line of webbing woven in. Possibly as a way for birds to see the web and not fly though it. Webs have a thick, zig-zag line of webbing woven in. Possibly as a way for birds to see the web and not fly though it. It is fun to catch bugs and toss them into the web and watch the spider attack and wrap them in silk. It is fun to catch bugs and toss them into the web and watch the spider attack and wrap them in silk.

48 Spittlebug

49 Spittlebug Order: Homoptera, the aphids, leafhoppers, and cicadas Order: Homoptera, the aphids, leafhoppers, and cicadas Also called froghoppers or spittle insects. Also called froghoppers or spittle insects. The nymphal stages (pre-adult) life in masses of white froth on the leaves or stems of plants during May and June. The nymphal stages (pre-adult) life in masses of white froth on the leaves or stems of plants during May and June. They make this froth by sucking the juices out of the stem and churning it up into what looks like spit. They make this froth by sucking the juices out of the stem and churning it up into what looks like spit.

50 Praying Mantis

51 Order: Mantodea, the mantises Order: Mantodea, the mantises Medium to large, green or brownish, slender insects with front legs adapted for catching and holding prey. Medium to large, green or brownish, slender insects with front legs adapted for catching and holding prey. Head moves around on a neck. Head moves around on a neck. They feed on other insects and spiders, although once in a great while the large ones might catch a hummingbird. They feed on other insects and spiders, although once in a great while the large ones might catch a hummingbird. They are very beneficial insects, harmless to humans, and should not be destroyed. They are very beneficial insects, harmless to humans, and should not be destroyed.

52 Brown Recluse

53 Order: Araneae, the spiders Order: Araneae, the spiders Also referred to as the “fiddle-back” or “violin” spider. Also referred to as the “fiddle-back” or “violin” spider. One of two Kansas spiders (the other is the very shy and uncommon black widow) that is dangerous to humans. One of two Kansas spiders (the other is the very shy and uncommon black widow) that is dangerous to humans. It’s venom can impose a very serious injury, although not deadly. The bite may ulcerate and require removal of tissue by a doctor. It’s venom can impose a very serious injury, although not deadly. The bite may ulcerate and require removal of tissue by a doctor. Common in outbuildings, under boards and boxes, found in little-used closets, attics and garages, where it is dry and warm. Common in outbuildings, under boards and boxes, found in little-used closets, attics and garages, where it is dry and warm.

54 Scorpion

55 Scorpion

56 Scorpion Order: Scorpiones, the scorpions Order: Scorpiones, the scorpions Lives under stones on sunny hillsides. Lives under stones on sunny hillsides. Hunts insects at night and stings with their tail. Hunts insects at night and stings with their tail. Sting is similar to that of a bee. Sting is similar to that of a bee.

57 Dung Beetle

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59 Order: Coleoptera, the beetles. Order: Coleoptera, the beetles. A type of Scarab beetle. A type of Scarab beetle. Helps with the decomposition of animal manure and adds nutrients to the soil. Helps with the decomposition of animal manure and adds nutrients to the soil. Consumes large amounts of dung. Consumes large amounts of dung.

60 Common Skimmer

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62 Order: Odonata, the dragonflies and damselflies. Order: Odonata, the dragonflies and damselflies. One of the most common and best known dragonflies in Kansas. One of the most common and best known dragonflies in Kansas. Found over ponds and meadows. Found over ponds and meadows.

63 Green Darner

64 Order: Odonata, the dragonflies and damselflies. Order: Odonata, the dragonflies and damselflies. One of the largest dragonflies in Kansas. One of the largest dragonflies in Kansas. Flies low at dusk to catch insects near ponds. Flies low at dusk to catch insects near ponds.

65 Eastern Pondhawk

66 Order: Odonata, the dragonflies and damselflies. Order: Odonata, the dragonflies and damselflies. Lives over quiet waters, likes mats of duckweed and floating plants. Lives over quiet waters, likes mats of duckweed and floating plants. One of the most ferocious dragonflies: attacks all kinds of prey including each other. One of the most ferocious dragonflies: attacks all kinds of prey including each other.

67 Paper Nest Wasp

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69 Order: Hymenoptera, the ants, bees, and wasps. Order: Hymenoptera, the ants, bees, and wasps. Valuable insects that eat large number of caterpillars. Valuable insects that eat large number of caterpillars.

70 Obscure Bird Grasshopper

71 Order: Orthoptera, the grasshoppers and katydids. Order: Orthoptera, the grasshoppers and katydids. Light yellow line down its back. Light yellow line down its back. Hind legs have bright yellow spikes. Hind legs have bright yellow spikes.

72 Daddylonglegs

73 Daddylonglegs Order: Opiliones, the harvestmen. Order: Opiliones, the harvestmen. Especially common in fall. Especially common in fall. Feeds on dead insects and sometimes wet dog food. Feeds on dead insects and sometimes wet dog food. Very easy to identify. Very easy to identify. Also called harvestmen. Also called harvestmen. Harmless—has a lot of venom, but teeth are too small to penetrate human skin. Harmless—has a lot of venom, but teeth are too small to penetrate human skin.

74 Lone Star Tick Lone-star tick, easily identified by white spot on back.

75 Ticks (various species) Order: Acari, the mites and ticks Order: Acari, the mites and ticks Family: Ixodidae Family: Ixodidae Several species of ticks in Kansas: Several species of ticks in Kansas: Lone star tick, has white spot in center of back Lone star tick, has white spot in center of back Gulf coast tick, looks similar to Dog tick, with pale netting mark behind head. Gulf coast tick, looks similar to Dog tick, with pale netting mark behind head. American Dog tick, large tick with U-shape behind head. American Dog tick, large tick with U-shape behind head. Black-legged tick, the one in Kansas that is often the transmitter of Lyme Disease. Not a deer tick, but people call it that because it is similar. Black-legged tick, the one in Kansas that is often the transmitter of Lyme Disease. Not a deer tick, but people call it that because it is similar.

76 References Insects in Kansas, by Kansas Department of Agriculture, Nov. 2000 Insects in Kansas, by Kansas Department of Agriculture, Nov. 2000 Kaufman Focus Guide to Butterflies of North America, by Jim P. Brock and Kenn Kaufman Kaufman Focus Guide to Butterflies of North America, by Jim P. Brock and Kenn Kaufman Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America, by Eric R. Eaton. Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America, by Eric R. Eaton. Dragonflies through Binoculars, by Sidney W. Dunkle, 2000 Dragonflies through Binoculars, by Sidney W. Dunkle, 2000


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