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Press Esc to exit programme at any time About this presentation The following programme has been developed by the JISC Regional Support Centre for south.

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Presentation on theme: "Press Esc to exit programme at any time About this presentation The following programme has been developed by the JISC Regional Support Centre for south."— Presentation transcript:

1 Press Esc to exit programme at any time About this presentation The following programme has been developed by the JISC Regional Support Centre for south & west Scotland as exemplar material for teaching practitioners. It is designed to demonstrate how Microsoft Office & web based resources can be exploited for teaching & learning purposes. For more details contact Joan Walker

2 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Travel & Tourism [ Int 2 ] Unit - British Isles Tourist Destinations [Int 2] - D43911 An Introduction - Let’s look at Scotland

3 Press Esc to exit programme at any time contents This learning experience is designed to enable learners to demonstrate the knowledge and skills required to provide tourist information on Scotland and makes significant use of web based resources Section 1Section 1- Current & Future Tourism Trends in Scotland Section 1 Section 2 Section 2 – The Regional Geography of Scotland Section 2 Section 3 Section 3 – Focussing on the Regions Section 3 Section 4 Section 4 – Check your knowledge Section 4

4 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Section 1 - Tourism in Scotland In Scotland during the year 2000, almost 21 million tourists took overnight trips and spent just under £4.5 billion. This supports around 8% of all employment. Within the UK, England is the main market but a large market comes from within Scotland itself. Key foreign markets are the United States of America, Germany and France. In this section you’ll explore current & future trends for tourism in Scotland. Click here for a worksheet and use the link provided to help you answer each question. You can print the worksheet off and return it to your tutor or complete an electronic version and it to your tutor when it’s complete. Remember to save your worksheet regularly.here

5 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Section 2- The regional geography of Scotland Can you identify all the regions on the map? Click to see how well you know the regional geography of Scotland Click here to see how well you know the regional geography of Scotlandhere Before moving on click on each region on the map to find out a bit more about each of them. Click for a summary sheet you can take notes on. Click here for a summary sheet you can take notes on.here Press Esc to exit programme at any time

6 Edinburgh, Lothian & the Borders Edinburgh, Scotland's historic capital city is enjoying a renaissance of its cultural and artistic heritage & is now home to the new Scottish Parliament - the first in nearly 300 years. Edinburgh's coast and countryside offer a beautiful backdrop to the towering grace of the capital. This is a historic setting, with castles, great houses and miles of glorious coastline. It's also the ancient home of the game of golf. You can find some of the great links and parkland courses of the world here. Stretching eastwards from Edinburgh in east central Scotland, East Lothian has a coastline that is washed to the north by the Firth of Forth and to the east by the North Sea. Bounded to the south by the Lammermuir Hills, its chief towns are Musselburgh, Haddington, Tranent, Dunbar, North Berwick and the resort of Gullane with its championship Muirfield golf course. Edinburgh & Lothians has an impressive events calendar including the annual Edinburgh International Arts Festival, the Edinburgh Easter Parade, the International Festival of the Sea, the Monet exhibition at the refurbished Royal Scottish Academy and the opening of the new Scottish Parliament building. click here to see the locations.here "(c) Gazetteer for Scotland, “ "Used with permission from the Gazetteer for Scotland at

7 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Aberdeen & Grampian Highlands Lying between the Grampian Mountains and the North Sea which washes its north and east coasts, rural Aberdeenshire is best known for its beef cattle, its coastal fishing villages and its many historic castles. Aberdeenshire is also home to major paper, food and drink, tourism and oil-related industries. It is watered by the Dee, Don, Ythan and Deveron Rivers and its chief towns are Fraserburgh, Banff, Inverurie, Stonehaven and Peterhead which is Europe's largest white-fish port. The City's coat of arms depicting three castles and its motto - 'Bon Accord' - are said to date from the time of King Robert the Bruce and the massacre of English troops in the neighbourhood. The motto was the watchword to initiate the campaign and the arms represent three castles that stood on three hills around which Aberdeen developed, namely Castle Hill, the Port or Windmill Hill (Gallowgate) and St. Catherine's Hill. Robert the Bruce granted his hunting lands on the forest of Stocket to the citizens of Aberdeen. These 'Freedom Lands' provided revenue that was eventually applied to creating the city's Common Good Fund – click here to see the locationshere "(c) Gazetteer for Scotland, “ "Used with permission from the Gazetteer for Scotland at

8 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Argyll & Bute Situated on the heavily indented Atlantic seaboard of western Scotland, Argyll and Bute is a land of lochs, mountains and islands. Within its bounds lie the Cowal peninsula and the long peninsula known as the Mull of Kintyre, Lochs Awe, Fyne and Etive, and many of the inner isles of Scotland including Mull, Coll, Tiree, Islay, Jura, Colonsay, Gigha, Lismore and Bute. Its main settlements are Lochgilphead, Campbeltown, Oban, Dunoon, Inveraray, Arrochar, Helensburgh and Tobermory. Local industries include forestry, farming, fishing and fish farming. Tourism is of great importance and attractions include picturesque scenery, sizeable mountains, ancient castles and whisky distilleries. Numerous distilleries include those at Oban and Campbeltown, but it is on the island of Islay where its eight distilleries are particularly noted for the rich peaty qualities of their malts. The region includes a significant number of native Gaelic speakers, approaching 10% of the population. click here to see the locations.here "(c) Gazetteer for Scotland, “ "Used with permission from the Gazetteer for Scotland at

9 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Dumfries & Galloway The coast of Dumfries & Galloway consists of rocky headlands and sandy bays and is washed to the south by the Solway Firth and to the west by the North Channel which separates Scotland from Ireland. The rolling hills of the Southern Uplands are drained to the Solway Firth by the rivers Nith, Annan and Esk whose valleys form the three districts of Nithsdale, Annandale and Eskdale. Some 30% of Scotland's dairy cattle come from Dumfries and Galloway and textiles, engineering and food processing are important industries in towns such as Dumfries, Kirkcudbright, Wigtown, Newton Stewart, New Galloway, Moffat, Lockerbie, Annan, Castle Douglas, Dalbeattie and the ferry port of Stranraer. Bordered to the north and east by South Ayrshire, East Ayrshire, South Lanarkshire and the Scottish Borders, it comprises the former counties of Dumfries, Kirkcudbright and Wigton. Its administrative centre is Dumfries. click here to see the locations.here "(c) Gazetteer for Scotland, “ "Used with permission from the Gazetteer for Scotland at

10 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Fife, Angus & Stirling The 'Kingdom of Fife' in east central Scotland forms a peninsula jutting out into the North Sea with the Firth of Forth to the south and the Firth of Tay to the north. West Fife, between Dunfermline and Kirkcaldy, is the region's industrial and commercial heartland, while the picturesque old fishing villages of the East Neuk are popular with tourists. Its chief rivers are the River Eden and the River Leven which flow eastwards to the sea from sources to the north and south of the Lomond Hills. The ancient city of St Andrews at the eastern tip of Fife has the oldest university in Scotland (1412) and takes its name from Scotland's patron saint whose bones are said to have been brought here. From a town of the same name that lies on the River Forth not far from the historic battlefield of Bannockburn, Stirling in central Scotland stretches northwards into the Highlands as far as Loch Tay and the hills of Breadalbane. It includes Balquhidder and other lands to the east of Loch Lomond associated with Rob Roy who lies buried on the north shore of Loch Voil, and also the Trossachs, a picturesque district popularized in the poems and novels of Sir Walter Scott. Tourism, forestry, and farming are the chief sources of employment and the main towns are Stirling, Bridge of Allan, Dunblane, Doune, Callander, Aberfoyle, Killin and Crianlarich. click here to see the locations. "(c) Gazetteer for Scotland, “ "Used with permission from the Gazetteer for Scotland at

11 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Orkney & Shetland Orkney, the southernmost group of the Northern Isles, comprises some 70 islands of which 20 are inhabited; the largest island is known to Orcadians simply as 'The Mainland'. Ruled by the Norse until 1468, the islands' ancient history can be traced in their historic and prehistoric monuments which date back over 5,000 years. In addition to historic sites and a flourishing agricultural economy, Orkney's sea angling and seabird colonies attract many visitors. The northernmost islands of the British Isles, Shetland comprises over 100 islands of which 15 are inhabited. They were acquired by Scotland in 1468 as part of the marriage settlement between a Danish princess and the future King James III and every year the midwinter festival of Up Helly-Aa is a reminder of their Scandinavian past. After decades of decline the population of Shetland rose sharply in the 1970s and 1980s as a direct result of oil related activity in the North Sea, but apart from a dependence on oil, agriculture and fishing, its fiddle music and knitwear are known throughout the world. click here to see the locationshere "(c) Gazetteer for Scotland, “ "Used with permission from the Gazetteer for Scotland at

12 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Outer Hebrides The windswept Western Isles or Outer Hebrides comprise the 'long island' of Lewis and Harris and islands to the south including North Uist, South Uist and Barra. Here the topography is shaped by the underlying ancient Lewisian gneiss, much of which is covered with a thin layer of peat that is still used as a major source of fuel for the winter fire. Nearly half the islands' households live on croft land and farming, fishing, fish farming and the manufacture of Harris Tweed are the chief economic activities. Some 68% of its people speak the Gaelic language. The main towns and ferry ports are Stornoway, Tarbert, Leverburgh, Lochmaddy, Lochboisdale and Castlebay. click here to see the locationshere "(c) Gazetteer for Scotland, “ "Used with permission from the Gazetteer for Scotland at

13 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Perthshire The former counties of Perth and Kinross combine to form this largely rural region which straddles the boundary between the Highlands and Lowlands of Scotland. It stretches from the famous trout-fishing waters of Loch Leven in the south to the Grampian Mountains beyond Blair Atholl in the north, and from Loch Tay in the West to the Lomond Hills in the east. Watered by the Tay, Earn, Tummel, Garry and Isla rivers, its leading towns are Perth, Crieff, Coupar Angus, Blairgowrie, Auchterarder, Comrie, Aberfeldy, Pitlochry and Kinross. click here to see the locations.here "(c) Gazetteer for Scotland, “ "Used with permission from the Gazetteer for Scotland at

14 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Highland Ardnamurchan Point Inverness Durness The Cullin Hills Ullapool The Highland region stretches from Appin in the south to John o' Groats in the far north, encompassing the greater part of NW Scotland with its mountains, lochs and heavily indented Atlantic coastline as well as the island of Skye. The region is bisected by the Great Glen, a natural geological fault line within which lies Loch Ness and the Caledonian Canal. Its chief towns are Inverness, Fort William, Mallaig, Dingwall, Wick, Invergordon, and Dornoch – click here to see the locationshere "(c) Gazetteer for Scotland, “ "Used with permission from the Gazetteer for Scotland at

15 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Greater Glasgow & Ayrshire Situated astride the River Clyde in the west Central Lowlands, Glasgow is Scotland's largest city and the unitary authority with the largest population. Its cathedral, dedicated to St Mungo, was built in the 12th century, but the city owes much of its growth first to the 17th-18th century tobacco trade and later to shipbuilding during the colonial era. Much of Glasgow's heavy industry has been replaced by modern hi-tech and commercial business and the city now flourishes as a cultural centre with an annual festival of the arts. A coastal plain backed by hilly moorland makes up the landscape of Ayrshire which lies to the south of the River Clyde between Glasgow and the Firth of Clyde. Its population is largely concentrated in the coastal settlements of Greenock, Gourock, Port Glasgow, Inverkip and Wemyss Bay. Ferry terminals offer tourists quick access to the Highlands and its Clydeport container terminal and other dock facilities give local hi-tech and shipping businesses access to national and international markets. Stretching southwards from the Kilsyth Hills to the River Clyde, North Lanarkshire lies to the east of Glasgow and includes the towns of Airdrie, Coatbridge, Cumbernauld, Kilsyth, Motherwell, Shotts and Wishaw. It is situated at the industrial heart of Scotland and is linked to the rest of Europe via the Eurocentral freight village at Mossend. click here to see the locations.here "(c) Gazetteer for Scotland, “ "Used with permission from the Gazetteer for Scotland at

16 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Pick one of the regions in Scotland and carry out an investigation using these links Write a short report outlining useful tourist information. Use the following headings as a guide: Facts & figures getting around places of interest where to stay eating out click here if you need some help with report writing here Section 3 – focus on the regions Press Esc to exit programme at any time

17 Section 4 – test your knowledge This section contains a short multiple choice exercise to check that you have completed and understood this introductory section of the course – Looking at Scotland - click here to begin click here to begin click here to begin

18 Press Esc to exit programme at any time This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License. Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License

19 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Highland page 2 Ullapool Wick Thurso InvernessThe Cullins Skye Ardnamurchan point John O’Groats Fort William Dornoch Mallaig Dingwall Invergordon Durness Highland Region

20 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Aberdeen page 2 Aberdeen & Grampian Highlands Aberdeen Peterhead Banff Fraserburgh Glenfiddich Inverurie Stonehaven

21 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Edinburgh page 2 Edinburgh Musselburgh Dunbar North Berwick Berwick upon Tweed Gullane Galashields Peebles Edinburgh Lothian & the Borders

22 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Argyll & Bute page 2 Argyll & Bute Mull Mull of Kintyre Tiree Oban Islay Jura Lochgilphead Campbeltown Tobermory Colonsay Coll Inverary Bute

23 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Perthshire page 2 Perth, Angus & Dundee Aberfeldy Forfar Blairgowrie Pitlochry St Andrews Arbroath Montrose Dundee Perth Crieff Couper Angus Kinross

24 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Outer Hebrides page 2 Outer Hebrides Stornaway Barra South Uist North Uist Harris Isle of Lewis Benbecula Tarbert

25 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Orkney & Shetland page 2 Orkney & Shetland Shetland Orkney Kirkwall Lerwick Stromness

26 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Glasgow page 2 Greater Glasgow & Ayrshire Motherwell Glasgow Troon Prestwick Greenock KIlmarnock Ayr Arran East KilbrideLargs Girvan

27 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Fife page 2 Fife, Kinross & Stirling Dundee Kirkaldy Stirling Perth Glenrothes St Andrews Dunfermline Kinross

28 Press Esc to exit programme at any time Dumfries & Galloway page 2 Greater Glasgow & Ayrshire Newton StewartStranraer Moffat Castle Douglas WigtonKirkcudbright Annan Dumfries


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