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South Dakota Common Core Literacy in the Content Areas South Dakota Common Core Literacy in the Content Areas Michele

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Presentation on theme: "South Dakota Common Core Literacy in the Content Areas South Dakota Common Core Literacy in the Content Areas Michele"— Presentation transcript:

1 South Dakota Common Core Literacy in the Content Areas South Dakota Common Core Literacy in the Content Areas Michele Davis @

2 Outcomes Integrate Common Core State Standards for Informational Literacy into content Work with strategies to enhance informational/content literacy

3 Agenda Begin 9 a.m. Lunch 11:45 to 1:00 Dismiss 4 p.m.

4 Norms  Listen with engagement  Honor each other’s thinking  Honor private think time  Everyone has a voice  Be respectful of all comments  Participation is expected  Limit side conversations  Take care of your needs  Turn cell phones off or to vibrate

5 Content Background Discuss with your elbow partner: What text sample did you bring? What is important about this content? What do you want students to know, understand, and do as a result of this text reading?

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8 What Does This Mean to ME? Building literacy skills builds student content knowledge Building literacy skills among students is the shared responsibility of all staff WE ARE ALL TEACHERS OF LITERACY!

9 4 Anchor Standards of Reading Key Ideas & Details Craft & Structure Integration of Knowledge & Ideas Range & Complexity

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11 http://sdccteachers.k12.sd.us/ Go to the LINK below:

12 LITERACY STANDARDS I USE LITERACY STANDARDS I DON’T USE On 2 STICKY NOTES  title one: LITERACY STANDARDS I USE title the other one: LITERACY STANDARDS I DON’T USE

13 20 -30 minutes— 1.Review as many of the disaggregated standards as possible. 2.Identify which standards you already incorporate into their content instruction. Write the number(s) of the standard on a STICKY NOTE. 3.Identify which ones are not included as much or at all. Write these on a STICKY NOTE as well. 4.Think about: Should they be included? How could they be included?

14 Common Core Literacy for All 1 Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction Close Reading 2 Reading, writing and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational Text-Dependent Questions 3 Regular practice with complex text and its academic language Text Structures

15 What is a Close Reading? Begin with the TEXT.

16 Webb Leveling & Your Lesson Webb Leveling & Your Lesson Share with an elbow partner: – Where are you currently at with this lesson? – Could you/should you bring in higher levels of thinking (Webb Levels)? – How could you differentiate the lesson?

17 What is a Close Reading?

18 Teaching Channel: https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/reading- like-a-historian-contextualization-complete-lesson https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/reading- like-a-historian-contextualization-complete-lesson 8:55—13:10 I do, We do, You do… Gradual Release of Responsibility Read/Reflect/Respond Text and Graphic Organizer

19 Engaging the Adolescent Learning, 1/2012 Why do our students need to converse with the text in new ways?

20 Close Reading We want students to be “text detectives” who gather evidence to support the conclusions they draw. –Catherine Thome

21 Close Reading Three Levels of Reading – On the lines – Between the lines – Beyond the lines Laying the Foundation  LITERAL  INFERENTIAL  EVALUATIVE

22 On the line: Where is the young man going? Between the lines: What might the red flag be used for? What does their sun burns suggest they do for a living? BEYOND the lines: What does the blue color suggest vs. the white…and how does it relate to where the 2 are looking?

23 Marking the Text-Technology Marking the Text-Technology

24 Marking the Text

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26 Reading with Your Pen

27 Reading for Meaning What you need to do: Identify a short piece of text (or visual, lab, table, graph, blog post, text excerpt, article) Generate a series of statements which you want students to support or refute. Introduce the topic and have students preview statements before reading. Have students record evidence for or against while they read. Have students discuss their evidence (in pairs or small groups). Integrate ideas into a large group discussion where you can provide additional clarifications. Extension: Written argument in support of their ideas. The Core Six: Essential Strategies for Achieving Excellence with the Common Core

28 Close Reading Leads to Writing Close Reading Leads to Writing 3 x 3 Writing Frame The Core Six: Essential Strategies for Achieving Excellence with the Common Core BEGINNING What are you trying to prove? MIDDLE What is your evidence? Prove it. END Close the writing. Make your case or restate the question. Magic THREE: Reasons, causes, purposes Elaborate on each reason or provide an example. Wrap it up. Harriet Tubman is a person to be admired, even today. One reason:  Brave Another reason:  Smart Finally:  Not selfish  Risked her life to free people from slavery  Helped create Underground Railroad  Sacrificed her own life to make sure her children and grandchildren would never be slaves Harriet Tubman saved many people from a life of slavery. She should be remembered for her courage.

29 3-2-1 Visual Literacy 3-2-1 Visual Literacy Social Studies/History – Examine the picture or item On an index card or sticky note (or in a journal) – List 3 things you observe – List 2 things you can infer with supporting evidence – List 1 thing you want to explore further or know more about Conduct a group “share” How does this fit with content rich informational text? With using evidence to support statements?

30 Visual Literacy Social Studies/History Visual Literacy Social Studies/History 3 = Observe 2 = Infer 1= Explore

31 3-2-1 Visual Literacy 3-2-1 Visual Literacy Science, Technical Subjects Examine the picture or item (Science) On an index card or sticky note (or in a journal) – List 3 things you observe – List 2 things you can claim with supporting evidence and reasoning – List 1 thing you want to explore further to gather more evidence to prove your claim Conduct a group “share” How does this fit with content rich informational text? With using evidence to support statements?

32 Visual Literacy Science 3 = Observe 2 = Claim 1= Explore

33 3-2-1 Visual Literacy 3-2-1 Visual Literacy Art, Music Examine the picture or item On an index card or sticky note (or in a journal) – List 3 things you observe – List 2 things you can claim or infer with supporting evidence and reasoning – List 1 thing you want to explore further – Conduct a group “share” How does this fit with content rich informational text? With using evidence to support statements?

34 Visual Literacy Art 3 = Observe 2 = Claim or Infer 1= Explore

35 Back to Your TEXT Consider the text you brought with you today. What types of images might you use to provide a close reading that would engage your students with the content you are presenting. What constitutes a visual image? How would a close reading of a visual text cause your students to engage in high-level thinking?

36 Close Reading and CCSS Review the standards that you chose for your lesson. On the Advance Organizer, answer the question: – "Which close reading strategies apply to your lesson and chosen standards?" How will close reading improve student success in your content area?

37 Close Reading and CCSS Key Ideas and Details: 1.Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it: cite specific textual evidence… 2.Determine central ideas or themes and analyze their development; summarize key supporting details and ideas 3.Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact (Reading for Meaning—depending on teacher-created questions) In addition, depending upon the text, Craft and Structure: 4: Words and phrases shape meaning Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: 7: Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media 8: Delineate and evaluate the argument and claims

38 Close Reading and CCSS Key Ideas and Details: 1.Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it: cite specific textual evidence… 2.Determine central ideas or themes and analyze their development; summarize key supporting details and ideas 3.Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact (Reading for Meaning—depending on teacher-created questions) In addition, depending upon the text, Craft and Structure: 4: Words and phrases shape meaning Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: 7: Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media 8: Delineate and evaluate the argument and claims Trainer Note: These anchor standards are the history/social studies standards.

39 Common Core Literacy for All Common Core Literacy for All 1 Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction Close Reading 2 Reading, writing and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational Text-Dependent Questions 3 Regular practice with complex text and its academic language Text Structures

40 Text Dependent Questions What are they?

41 Text Dependent Questions Text Dependent Questions Questions that can only be answered by referring explicitly back to the text in front of them 80 to 90 percent of the Reading Standards in each grade require text dependent analysis Aligned curriculum materials should have a similar percentage of text dependent questions from achievethecore.org…….

42 Non -examples: For example, in a close analytic reading of Lincoln’s “Gettysburg Address,” the following would not be text dependent questions: Why did the North fight the civil war? Have you ever been to a funeral or gravesite? Lincoln says that the nation is dedicated to the proposition that “all men are created equal.” Why is equality an important value to promote? The overarching problem with these questions is that they require no familiarity at all with Lincoln’s speech in order to answer them.

43 Close Reading is Required Good text dependent questions will often linger over specific phrases and sentences to ensure careful comprehension of the text—they help students see something worthwhile that they would not have seen on a more cursory reading.

44 Depth of Knowledge (Webb)

45 Participant Examples Create one text dependent question for your text. At your table, select one question to write on chart paper and share with the large group. Identify the literacy standard to which your question is aligned. What level of Webb is your question?

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47 Higher Level Questions Higher Level Questions

48 What would be appropriate for your text? What would be appropriate for your text? Which tasks would be appropriate for the text you brought? Discuss with your elbow partner. Analyze paragraphs closely sometimes on a word by word basis. Investigate how word choice alters meaning. Probe each detail in a text and how these details build to a whole. Examine how shifts in the direction of an argument or explanation are achieved and the impact of those shifts. Question why authors choose to begin and end when they do. Note and assess patterns of writing and what they achieve. Consider what the text leaves uncertain or unstated.

49 Non-Examples and Examples 49 In “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” Dr. King discusses nonviolent protest. Discuss, in writing, a time when you wanted to fight against something that you felt was unfair. In “The Gettysburg Address” Lincoln says the nation is dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Why is equality an important value to promote? What can you infer from King’s letter about the letter that he received? “The Gettysburg Address” mentions the year 1776. According to Lincoln’s speech, why is this year significant to the events described in the speech? Not Text-DependentText-Dependent

50 50 How do astronauts adjust to being weightless in space? What are some disadvantages of weightlessness? What are some fun aspects of being weightless? Identify details from the article that show how a lack of gravity can affect the human body. How do the experiences of other people—such as those of the astronauts in this essay—help us to discover the world? Cite textual evidence to support your response. Is weightlessness as described in “Life Without Gravity” something you would like to experience? Why or why not? Not Text-DependentText-Dependent Non-Examples and Examples

51 Text-Dependent Questions Work time to create two additional questions related your text. Identify the Webb Level for each question. 51

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53  create two additional questions related to your text  Identify the Webb Level for each question.

54 Not all responses to text dependent questions need to be written. Discussion is a great way to encourage close reading and supporting evidence from the text.

55 Most Importantly! Begin with the TEXT.

56 Common Core Literacy for All Common Core Literacy for All 1 Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction Close Reading 2 Reading, writing and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational Text-Dependent Questions 3 Regular practice with complex text and its academic language Text Structures

57 What format is used in the text? – Compare/contrast – Cause/effect – Problem/solution – Describing – Sequencing http://goo.gl/cDYf0

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59 Social Studies - Comparison/Contrast Social Studies - Comparison/Contrast RH 6 Grades 6-8Grades 9-10Grades 11-12

60 Text Structures Think-Pair-Share – Informational text (1 debate article per person) – Graphic organizer (pro/con) – Use your debate article to complete your graphic organizer – Find a partner at your table and briefly discuss your findings. – With whole table group, develop a consensus about your topic.

61 Science – Cause & Effect RST Grades 9-10

62 Text Structures Think-Pair-Share Text Structures Think-Pair-Share Science & Technical Group – Informational text (select 1 of the 3 articles) – Graphic organizer (cause and effect) THINK: Use your article to complete your graphic organizer PAIR: Find a partner at your table and briefly discuss your findings. SHARE: With whole table group, develop a consensus about your topic.

63 Text Structures Table Talk Text Structures Table Talk Examine your sample text; discuss with an “elbow partner” – What kind of text structure does your text exhibit? – What other types of graphic organizers could you use?

64 Revisiting How does this information of SHARED LITERACY affect or change the existing lesson? Examine your own text. In light of what you’ve learned today: – Is it content rich? – Does it contain academic language? – Is it of appropriate complexity?

65 SD DOE Info Literacy Pinterest SD DOE Info Literacy Pinterest http://goo.gl/40FNR

66 Registration for GRADED Graduate Credit Registration will close 5 days from today. Participants who attend the face-to-face session can register for 1 graduate credit from the University of South Dakota.

67 Course Requirements Participation in face-to-face workshop is a pre- requisite for course registration. Implementation of lesson which incorporates CCSS literacy as well as content standards. Strategies and content from face-to-face session will be embedded in lesson. Participation in online components.

68 Implementation Teach lesson or lessons which incorporate at least one literacy standard and as many ideas from the face-to-face session as possible. Write a reflection of the lesson following the rubric.

69 The Blackboard Learning Platform will be utilized. Participants will be placed in groups of 5 people of similar content and grade assignment. Participants will post their reflection papers. Participants will read and provide feedback to the other 4 people in their group. Work for the course will be completed within six weeks of the face-to-face session. On line Component

70 Grades All requirements for the course must be completed by (6 weeks after face-to-face session). A letter grade will be submitted by the instructor. Total points: 50 (45-50=A, 40-44=B, 35-39=C) – Reflection Paper: 30 pts. – Response to other group members: 20 pts (5 pts. per post.)

71 Registration 71 Participants will complete registration and payment on line. There will be a link on the USD Continuing and Distance Education Website for students to fill in and submit electronically. The course will be listed “Literacy Integration for Content Teachers” at: http://www.usd.edu/continuing-and- distance-education/customized-and- professional-education.cfm

72 Registration Registration 72 Rapid City: Jan. 10 – March 11 Pierre: Jan. 18 – March 18 Rapid City: Jan. 23 – March 22 Pierre: Jan. 25 – March 25 Aberdeen: Jan. 29 – March 28 Sioux Falls: Jan. 29 – March 28 Mobridge: Jan. 30 – April 2 Watertown: Feb. 1 – April 2 Plankinton: Feb. 4 – April 4 Huron: Feb. 8 – April 8 Sioux Falls: Feb. 25 – April 25 Mobridge: Feb. 27 – April 26

73 73 Week 1: Plan lesson Week 2: Teach lesson Week 3: Write reflection paper and post to Blackboard Weeks 4 – 6: Read others’ reflection papers and respond

74 Thank you Thank you for a wonderful day as we discussed: Literacy in the Content Areas Michele Davis @


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