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Narrativity, Education and Technology 1.What is Digital Literacy/Narrativity? –What is ‘literacy’ in the ‘Digital/Information Age’? –Why is Digital Literacy.

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Presentation on theme: "Narrativity, Education and Technology 1.What is Digital Literacy/Narrativity? –What is ‘literacy’ in the ‘Digital/Information Age’? –Why is Digital Literacy."— Presentation transcript:

1 Narrativity, Education and Technology 1.What is Digital Literacy/Narrativity? –What is ‘literacy’ in the ‘Digital/Information Age’? –Why is Digital Literacy important? –Components of Digital Literacy (Futurelab, UK) 2.A tale of two myths? The “Digital Native” and Digital Creativity 3.Technologies and tools to support and enhance Digital Literacy/Narrativity, across the curriculum

2 Digital Natives “Today’s students have not just changed incrementally from those of the past, nor simply changed their slang, clothes, body adornments, or styles, as has happened between generations previously. A really big discontinuity has taken place. One might even call it a “singularity” – an event which changes things so fundamentally that there is absolutely no going back. This so- called “singularity” is the arrival and rapid dissemination of digital technology in the last decades of the 20th century.” Prensky (2001)

3 Digital Natives “Today’s students – K through college – represent the first generations to grow up with this new technology. They have spent their entire lives surrounded by and using computers, videogames, digital music players, video cams, cell phones, and all the other toys and tools of the digital age. Today’s average college grads have spent less than 5,000 hours of their lives reading, but over 10,000 hours playing video games (not to mention 20,000 hours watching TV). Computer games, email, the Internet, cell phones and instant messaging are integral parts of their lives.” Prensky (2001)

4 Literacy and numeracy are much more than “reading, writing and arithmetic” “Traditionally we have thought about literacy as the skills of reading and writing; but today our understanding of literacy encompasses much more than that. Literacy includes the capacity to read, understand and critically appreciate various forms of communication including spoken language, printed text, broadcast media, and digital media. Throughout this document, when we refer to “literacy” we mean this broader understanding of the skill, including speaking and listening, as well as communication using not only traditional writing and print but also digital media. Literacy and Numeracy for Learning and Life (2011): http://www.education.ie/admin/servlet/blobservlet/lit_num_ strat.pdf http://www.education.ie/admin/servlet/blobservlet/lit_num_ strat.pdf

5 EU Kids Online: Enhancing Knowledge Regarding European Children's Use, Risk and Safety Online “centres on a cross-national survey of European children's experiences of the internet, focusing on uses, activities, risks and safety. It also maps parents' experiences, practices and concerns regarding their children's online risk and safety.” Report published on 22 nd September 2011, available online at: http://www2.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/EUKidsOnline/ Home.aspx http://www2.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/EUKidsOnline/ Home.aspx

6 Broadband usage EU Kids Online. (2011). EU Kids Online Final Report. Available online at: http://www2.lse.ac.uk/medi a@lse/research/EUKidsOn line/Home.aspx. Date last accessed: 28th September 2011. http://www2.lse.ac.uk/medi a@lse/research/EUKidsOn line/Home.aspx

7 ICT – a ‘benign addition’? Fool’s Gold: A Critical Look at Computers in Childhood (Cordes & Miller, 2000) – a refocusing on the ‘essentials of childhood (play, reading books and hands-on experiences of nature and the physical world)’ ‘Death of childhood thesis’ (Buckingham, 2000; Valentine and Holloway, 2001) (In Plowman, L. & Stephen, C. (2003) “A ‘benign addition’? A review of research on ICT and pre-school children.” Journal of Computer- Assisted Learning. 19 (2). (Special issue on Children and New Technologies), Blackwell Publishing: AUP, Aberdeen, pp. 149- 164.)

8 New technologies, new pedagogies “New technologies may lead to new concepts of play and learning in which ICT is much more than the ‘benign addition’ referred to by Cuban [2000], especially as new ways are found of conceptualising ICT so that the term does not simply denote standard computers. These shifts in thinking may lead to technologies that can encompass participation by practitioners, parents and children in different learning spaces and promote discovery, delight, curiosity, creativity, self-expression and pleasure in learning” (Plowman and Stephen, 2003: 160).

9 What is Digital Literacy? 1.How would you define digital literacy? What do you think are its core, distinct components, criteria, features? What kinds of technologies might be used? (4 minutes) 2.In your groups, discuss/critique the statement: “Children today are innately digitally competent.” (4 minutes) Futurelab, (December 2010). Digital Literacy Professional Development Resource. Available online at: http://www.futurelab.org.uk/sites/default/files/Digital_Literacy_Resource.pdf. Date last accessed: 26th September 2011. http://www.futurelab.org.uk/sites/default/files/Digital_Literacy_Resource.pdf

10 The Myth of the “Digital Native”? “1 Digital natives know it all. Only 36 per cent of 9-16-year-olds say it is very true that they know more about the internet than their parents. This myth obscures children’s needs to develop digital skills.” EU Kids Online. (2011). EU Kids Online Final Report. Available online at: http://www2.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/EUKidsOnline/Home.aspx. Date last accessed: 28th September 2011. http://www2.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/EUKidsOnline/Home.aspx

11 The Myth of Digital Creativity? “2 Everyone is creating their own content. The study showed that only one in five children had recently used a file- sharing site or created an avatar, half that number wrote a blog. Most children use the internet for ready- made content.” EU Kids Online. (2011). EU Kids Online Final Report. Available online at: http://www2.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/EUKidsOnline/Home.aspx. Date last accessed: 28th September 2011. http://www2.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/EUKidsOnline/Home.aspx

12 Futurelab. (2010). Digital literacy across the curriculum. Available online at: http://www.futurelab.org.uk/sites/default/files/Digital_Literacy_handbook_0.pdf. Date last accessed: 26th September 2011. http://www.futurelab.org.uk/sites/default/files/Digital_Literacy_handbook_0.pdf Components of Digital Literacy

13 Making Movies iMovie: www.apple.com/ilife/imoviewww.apple.com/ilife/imovie Windows Movie Maker: www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/movi emaker/default.mspx www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/movi emaker/default.mspx Animoto: www.animoto.comwww.animoto.com Photostory: www.microsoft.com/photostorywww.microsoft.com/photostory

14 Making Movies How might designing, producing and editing a movie, trailer, short film, instructional video support and enhance students’ understanding of your subject area/specialism? (3 minutes) How might it enhance their digital literacy? Which digital literacy components would it potentially enhance? (3 minutes) Futurelab, (December 2010). Digital Literacy Professional Development Resource. Available online at: http://www.futurelab.org.uk/sites/default/files/Digital_Literacy_Resource.pdf. Date last accessed: 26th September 2011. http://www.futurelab.org.uk/sites/default/files/Digital_Literacy_Resource.pdf

15 Animation - bringing learning to life Stop-frame animation, graphical animation Doink: www.doink.comwww.doink.com I Can Animate: http://www.kudlian.net/products/icananimate/ (Stop Motion and Timelapse)http://www.kudlian.net/products/icananimate/ Goanimate: http://goanimate.com/http://goanimate.com/ Pixton Animation/Comics: http://www.pixton.com/uk/create#videohttp://www.pixton.com/uk/create#video Comic Life: http://plasq.com/products/comiclifehttp://plasq.com/products/comiclife Potential of animation (Hall, Duignan & Long, 2011) –Engagement with subject area –Proxy for student enactment in class –Can bring concepts, principles, inanimate objects to life: anthropomorphism/zoomorphism –Creativity: design and post-production –Diverse pathways into learning –Accomplishment - building pupils’ confidence through storytelling

16 Digital Audio/Podcasting Audacity: www.audacity.sourceforge.netwww.audacity.sourceforge.net Radiowaves: www.radiowaves.co.ukwww.radiowaves.co.uk Jamendo: www.jamendo.com/enwww.jamendo.com/en The Freesound Project: www.freesound.orgwww.freesound.org GarageBand: http://www.apple.com/ilife/garageband/ http://www.apple.com/ilife/garageband/

17 FlashMob, LipDub Collaboration/participation Choreography/direction Recording/directing Dance, creativity, aesthetic movement Editing and post-production Multimedia Sharing

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19 Creative – originate, mix and re-mix media Potential to integrate disciplines, subject domains - Arts, Humanities, Science Computational logic – introduction to programming Constructionist, collaborative learning http://info.scratch.mit.edu/About_Scratch

20 Having fun with computer programming and games (Transition Unit for TY) http://www.ncca.ie/en/Curriculum_and_As sessment/Post- Primary_Education/Senior_Cycle/Transitio n_Year/Transition_Units/Having_fun_with_ computer_programming_and_games.pdfhttp://www.ncca.ie/en/Curriculum_and_As sessment/Post- Primary_Education/Senior_Cycle/Transitio n_Year/Transition_Units/Having_fun_with_ computer_programming_and_games.pdf

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23 Computer (Digital) Games and Mathematics “games may be more effective if they have intrinsic learning content, which: 1. Delivers learning material through the parts of the game that are the most fun to play, riding on the back of the flow experience produced by the game, and not interrupting or diminishing its impact. 2. Embodies learning material within the structure of the gaming world and the player’s interactions with it, providing an external representation of learning content that is explored through the core mechanics of the gameplay.” (Habgood at al, 2005)

24 ICT Curricula for Educators (EPICT) and Learners (Digital Cre8or) Digital Creator – create-share: http://www.digitalcre8or.ie/http://www.digitalcre8or.ie/ EPICT – European Pedagogical ICT Licence: www.epict.org www.epict.org

25 References/Resources Aardman Animation. Image of Wallace and Gromit. Available online at: http://www.aardman.com/aardman- characters/. Date last accessed: 26 th September 2011.http://www.aardman.com/aardman- characters/ Department of Education and Skills. (2011). Literacy and Numeracy for Learning and Life: The National Strategy to Improve Literacy and Numeracy among Children and Young People (2011-2020). Department of Education and Skills: Marlborough Street Dublin 1. Available online at: http://www.education.ie/admin/servlet/blobservlet/lit_num_strat.pdf?language=EN&igstat=true. Date last accessed: 20 th September 2011. http://www.education.ie/admin/servlet/blobservlet/lit_num_strat.pdf?language=EN&igstat=true EU Kids Online. (2011). EU Kids Online Final Report. Available online at: http://www2.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/EUKidsOnline/Home.aspx. Date last accessed: 28th September 2011. http://www2.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/EUKidsOnline/Home.aspx Futurelab. (December 2010). Digital Literacy Professional Development Resource. Available online at: http://www.futurelab.org.uk/sites/default/files/Digital_Literacy_Resource.pdf. Date last accessed: 26th September 2011. http://www.futurelab.org.uk/sites/default/files/Digital_Literacy_Resource.pdf Futurelab. (2010). Digital literacy across the curriculum. Available online at: http://www.futurelab.org.uk/sites/default/files/Digital_Literacy_handbook_0.pdf. Date last accessed: 26th September 2011. http://www.futurelab.org.uk/sites/default/files/Digital_Literacy_handbook_0.pdf Hall, T., Duignan, S., & Long, B.T. (2011). "Quality through Synergy: Technology-Enhanced Learning (Animation, Virtualisation and Multi-User Virtual Environments (MUVEs) in Higher Education“. In Hourigan, T., Murray, L., & Riordan, E. (eds.) Quality Issues in ICT Integration: Third Level Disciplines and Learning Contexts. Cambridge Scholars Publishing: Newcastle Upon Tyne, pp. 28-46. Habgood, M. P. J., Ainsworth, S. E., & Benford, S. (2005) “Endogenous fantasy and learning in digital games.” Simulation Gaming 2005 36: 483. DOI: 10.1177/1046878105282276. Available online at: http://sag.sagepub.com/content/36/4/483.full.pdf. Date last accessed: 26th September 2011. Habgood, M.P.J. Screenshot of Zombie Division: Sumo Digital. Available online at: http://gamelearning.co.uk/hiddenlevel/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/ZombieDivision.jpg. Date last accessed: 26th September 2011. http://gamelearning.co.uk/hiddenlevel/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/ZombieDivision.jpg Plowman, L. & Stephen, C. (2003) “A ‘benign addition’? A review of research on ICT and pre-school children.” Journal of Computer-Assisted Learning. 19 (2). (Special issue on Children and New Technologies), Blackwell Publishing: AUP, Aberdeen, pp. 149-164. Prensky, M. (2001). “Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants”. From On the Horizon (MCB University Press, Vol. 9 No. 5, October 2001). Available online at: http://www.marcprensky.com/writing/Prensky%20- %20Digital%20Natives,%20Digital%20Immigrants%20-%20Part1.pdf. Date last accessed: 25 th September 2011.http://www.marcprensky.com/writing/Prensky%20- %20Digital%20Natives,%20Digital%20Immigrants%20-%20Part1.pdf


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