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Class slides for 3/16 & 3/17 “Ain’t So / Is Not”.

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Presentation on theme: "Class slides for 3/16 & 3/17 “Ain’t So / Is Not”."— Presentation transcript:

1 Class slides for 3/16 & 3/17 “Ain’t So / Is Not”

2 Halperin, Russell, Trzesniewski, Gross, and Dweck (2011) recently published an influential paper showing that inducing malleable beliefs about groups led to more positive attitudes toward out-groups. The more Israeli Jews and Palestinians believed that social groups in general had a fixed inherent nature, the more negatively they were disposed toward each other. Although the scientific evidence for the observed effect is unambiguous—for example, beliefs about group malleability were measured in some studies and manipulated in other studies, the authors used a nationwide sample (N = 500)— it remains unclear why the effect occurs. Building upon earlier work on lay theories about personality (Chiu, Hong, & Dweck, 1997), we hypothesized that the effect of beliefs about group malleability on attitudes toward out-groups is mediated by perceived threat. The purpose of the present paper is to replicate the Halperin et al. findings and to provide evidence for the idea that perceived threat is the generating mechanism for the effect. Simão, Claudia and Markus Brauer. “Beliefs about Group Malleability and Out-group Attitudes: The Mediating Role of Perceived Threat in Interactions with Out-group Members.” European Journal of Social Psychology 45.1 (February 2015):

3 Halperin, Russell, Trzesniewski, Gross, and Dweck (2011) recently published an influential paper showing that inducing malleable beliefs about groups led to more positive attitudes toward out-groups. The more Israeli Jews and Palestinians believed that social groups in general had a fixed inherent nature, the more negatively they were disposed toward each other. Although the scientific evidence for the observed effect is unambiguous—for example, beliefs about group malleability were measured in some studies and manipulated in other studies, the authors used a nationwide sample (N = 500)— it remains unclear why the effect occurs. Building upon earlier work on lay theories about personality (Chiu, Hong, & Dweck, 1997), we hypothesized that the effect of beliefs about group malleability on attitudes toward out-groups is mediated by perceived threat. The purpose of the present paper is to replicate the Halperin et al. findings and to provide evidence for the idea that perceived threat is the generating mechanism for the effect. Simão, Claudia and Markus Brauer. “Beliefs about Group Malleability and Out-group Attitudes: The Mediating Role of Perceived Threat in Interactions with Out-group Members.” European Journal of Social Psychology 45.1 (February 2015): clear on suggested repeat cause thought of

4 “We intend to calculate the average number of calories per day in mess hall meals.”

5 Exercise 1: Take a paragraph from this book and dress it down, rewriting it in informal colloquial language. Then rewrite the same paragraph again by dressing it up, making it much more formal. Then rewrite the paragraph one more time in a way that blends the two styles. Share your paragraphs with a classmate, and discuss which versions are most effective and why.

6 Text CONTEXT Writer Reader Subject The Rhetorical Situation

7 Walking tours Pounding the quad Marching back and forth across the middle of the barracks Dating the checkered lady

8 car automobile wheelsride VW bug beetle roller skate pregnant roller skate transportation

9 informalformal slang, colloquialformal genericspecific vagueprecise rude, vulgarpolite

10


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