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Courageous Conversations FACILITATED BY MALCOLM FIALHO – SENIOR DIVERSITY OFFICER.

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Presentation on theme: "Courageous Conversations FACILITATED BY MALCOLM FIALHO – SENIOR DIVERSITY OFFICER."— Presentation transcript:

1 Courageous Conversations FACILITATED BY MALCOLM FIALHO – SENIOR DIVERSITY OFFICER

2 The University of Western Australia A fish is the last one to know what water is Chinese Proverb

3 The University of Western Australia Key Drivers Global University – top 50 in 50 vision ‘Citizens of the Globe’

4 The University of Western Australia Rights and Responsibilities  Everyone has the right to work and study in environments marked by respect, dignity, safety, and free of discrimination, harassment, and bullying.  People work best in a setting marked by mutual respect, personal dignity, and support, which utilises one's skills and abilities, and encourages further learning.  We VALUE respect, diversity, inclusiveness, and fairness for all staff and students.

5 The University of Western Australia Diversity Wheel

6 The University of Western Australia Understanding Privilege  Privilege is defined as those conditions and circumstances enjoyed by a person because he/she is a member of the majority group in a society at any given point in time.  Majority group refers to the largest group, while a minority group is a group with fewer members represented in the social system.  For the purposes of a discussion about privilege, majority group also signifies the group that has historically held advantages in terms of power and economic resources.  In an Australian context, it refers to able-bodied men of Anglo- Christian, heterosexual background.

7 The University of Western Australia Unconscious Bias  Refers to stereotypes about groups of people that individuals forms outside their own consciousness  Replicates the social hierarchy and influences behaviour  Results in decisions and actions based on perceptions of people’s gender, race, class and other characteristics  Often completely incompatible with our values

8 The University of Western Australia How ‘Unconscious Bias’ Manifests at Work  Evaluations of resumes and job credentials  Letters of recommendation  Academic esteem  Auditions  Pay gaps  Distribution of mentoring, coaching, sponsorship  The construction of merit

9 The University of Western Australia

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15 Education – A gendered paradigm? Reproducing professional ‘habit’ ‘Soft’ competencies – feminine Lack of gender ‘competence’ Achieving life balance challenges

16 The University of Western Australia Continued…… Leaky ‘pipeline’ effect Imbalance of ‘A’ types, as opposed to ‘V’ types Issues of ‘image’ Research Vs Teaching

17 The University of Western Australia Themes of Heroic Leadership Sinclair, 2001  Heroism – rejecting weakness, valuing displays of courage  Physical toughness – exhibiting physical stamina and endurance, capacity for work, experience in working in difficult conditions  Emotional toughness – stoic, not showing weakness or doubt  Self-reliance – exhibiting strong drive, not dependent or vulnerable to others

18 The University of Western Australia Themes of Heroic Leadership continued… Corporate norms and practices can reinforce these values through:  Expectation of very long working hours  Rarely taking leave and often accumulating leave  Preparedness to sacrifice family and personal time as necessary for the job  Travel at short notice, life fits around work  An interest in sport and social rituals centred around sport celebrating masculine physical achievement

19 The University of Western Australia Rules of Individualism ‘No sissy stuff’: avoid all behaviours that suggest being weak, ‘not up to it’ ‘Be a big wheel’: success, status and superiority to command others ‘Be a sturdy oak’: reliability and dependability are defined as emotional stoicism ‘Give ‘em hell’: exude an aura of aggression, daring and risk-taking, go for it’

20 The University of Western Australia Gender Discrimination DOMINANT PARADIGMOTHER EXPERIENCES Group solidarityMarginalisation Affirming perceptionsExclusion Support NetworksNegative perceptions Exclusive clubLess opportunity to accrue ‘merit’ CamaraderieIsolation High profile tasks and special assignments Harassment (Sinclair)

21 The University of Western Australia Remains entrenched in Australian workplaces Under representation of women in workforce and leadership positions = serious economic and social implications Narrow definitions of ‘merit’, assessment; lack of workforce flexibility; chequered career paths; ‘construction’ of leadership; unfair emphasis on women’s looks/relationships/families; cultural ‘fit’ Unconscious Gender Bias – The Glass Ceiling

22 The University of Western Australia I’m not racist, but…..zero tolerance or zero acknowledgement? Unconscious Racial Bias & The Bamboo Ceiling Accent Skin colour Cultural Distance – ‘fit’ Low racial ‘consciousness’ and cultural competence Image & Brand (Innes, 2011)

23 The University of Western Australia Cultural Competence We go beyond protecting rights, and proactively developing core attributes to make you more effective and aware members of the student body, your workplace, and the community The development of personal, social and ethical awareness in an international context and the ability of UWA staff and students to communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in a range of contexts ‘a set of skills that allow individuals to increase their understanding of cultural differences within, among and between diverse cultural groups, marked by respect for such diversity

24 The University of Western Australia Cultural Competence….. continued ‘the ability to recognise and promote cultural diversity and incorporate it into professional practice, such that all social groups are treated with respect and in recognition of their different needs.’ Global citizens who are intellectually and emotionally comfortable with difference

25 The University of Western Australia Cultural Competence Assimilation: Invisibility and denial Tolerance: Lofty statements of intent Recognition: Operational response; ‘token’ Valuing and affirming: Consciousness

26 The University of Western Australia Race in Contemporary Australia Evolving, complex story Need to move from romantic multiculturalism (May, 2003) to revolutionary multiculturalism Invisibility and denial Indigenous issues, refugees & emerging communities (Muslim & African), International student violence, cyber racism (Innes, 2011)

27 The University of Western Australia Romantic Multiculturalism? Indigenous Australian life expectancy is 16-20 years less than non – Indigenous Australians Universities Australia Group of 8 senior structure have no CALD or Indigenous representation Whitest Parliament in the Western World Lack of access and full participation in both employment and education – Indigenous people, emerging communities, refugees Visible diversity is ‘invisible’ i.e. UWA Executive, Deans, Head of School/School Managers

28 The University of Western Australia Three Critical Factors Head (Cognitive) Heart (Experiential) Hands (Behavioural)

29 The University of Western Australia Condition 1: Keep the spotlight on Race Racial identity - Corner, culture and colour Racism – Individual & Systemic Prejudice + Power = Racism Equality and Equity

30 The University of Western Australia Condition 2: Connecting through your story ‘ Internal’ look – your unique race story ‘To what degree, and how, does race impact my life?’

31 The University of Western Australia Condition 3: Make complexity your friend! Individual and collective race ‘stories’ Critical analysis – how has my cultural background and race experience shaped me? Validating multiple viewpoints – ‘lens’

32 The University of Western Australia Common basis for miscommunication Way of Life

33 The University of Western Australia Common basis for miscommunication Contacts

34 The University of Western Australia Common basis for miscommunication What is punctuality?

35 The University of Western Australia Common basis for miscommunication How we deal with anger

36 The University of Western Australia Common basis for miscommunication How we queue

37 The University of Western Australia Common basis for miscommunication How we handle problems

38 The University of Western Australia Common basis for miscommunication How we see the boss

39 The University of Western Australia Condition 4: Understanding ‘White’ Privilege ‘…White privilege is like an invisible weightless knapsack of special provisions, maps, passports, code books, visas, clothes, tools and blank checks. As far as I can tell, my African American co-workers, friends, and acquaintance with whom I come into daily or frequent contact in this particular time, place and line of work cannot count on most of these conditions.’ (Peggy McIntosh, 1988)

40 The University of Western Australia Condition 4: Understanding ‘whiteness ’ Innovate prism to understand race and power All white people benefit from racial privilege, albeit unequally White ‘system’, not skin colour per se Sharing unearned benefits of a racially based system of wealth and privilege

41 The University of Western Australia ‘Whiteness’ and Higher Education ‘…(the) majority of students, faculty and administrators are oblivious not only to what it means to be White, but to the extend to which their Whiteness dominates the campus culture, making it uncomfortable for many people of colour...’ White privilege should be identified and examined – the solution is not ‘necessarily eliminating privileges or courtesies afforded Whites, but rather, expanding them to all human beings’. Rodriguez, 2004; Delgado, 2004

42 The University of Western Australia Heterosexual privilege/heteronormativity and sexuality discrimination Heterosexual people: will not hear comments such as “that heterosexual looking one over there” can hold hands with their partner without being stared at or have rude comments made to them do not have to be frightened about being beaten up because they are straight will not have to fear rejection from their friends or workmates if they talk about their partner will not become adept at the use of third person impersonal pronouns will not be in a position of having to lie about their lives to avoid ridicule would not consider their sexuality a reason for not getting a job or promotion

43 The University of Western Australia Unconscious Bias – The Pink Ceiling DON’T ASSUME THAT: everyone is either ‘homosexual’ or ‘heterosexual’. Instead, know that there is a continuum of attraction and affiliation. sexuality is the most important feature of a gay/lesbian/bisexual person’s identity. Instead, understand that sexuality is one facet of their relationship. all GLBTI people use the same language to describe themselves. Instead, recognise that the words and language commonly used (lesbian, gay, queer, dyke, homosexual) mean different things to different people and often make important political statements. GLBTI people are experts on the subject. GLBTI people are attracted to you. Instead, realize that they may or may not be attracted to you and use the opportunity to assess your own comfort levels towards sexuality. GLBTI people want ‘special rights’ or ‘special consideration’. GLBTI people believe the same things, want the same things or need the same things.

44 The University of Western Australia Ally Network aims to: Provide a visible network of identified ALLIES to the GLBTI (gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, intersex) community Create a safe, inclusive, and affirming environment Build a support and advocacy network Develop further awareness and visibility of GLBTI staff and students and their issues Forge cultural change at a local level www.equity.uwa.edu.au/about_equity_and_diversity_at_uwa/a lly_networkwww.equity.uwa.edu.au/about_equity_and_diversity_at_uwa/a lly_network

45 The University of Western Australia Inclusive Leadership Personal openness, approachability, emotional intelligence, maturity, empathy encouraging empathy, self-disclosure, psychological safety, collective identity and shared goals in staff – inclusive, open environment A high level of gender and ‘cultural’ competence Learning from mistakes and discomfort Having courageous conversations – capacity building Supported by an overarching workplace culture of inclusivity practice

46 The University of Western Australia Leaders and Cohesive Teams Create an environment that is optimal for people’s learning and working together …. … where different perspectives are the end game Deloitte Analyse accurately the impact that various people have on processes and outcomes Balance processes and outcomes (inclusiveness as a process) Be an agent for systemic and cultural change and for the development of all Leadership in Action, Centre for Creative Leadership

47 The University of Western Australia The Diversity Agenda: Your Role Identity: Who am I? What am I what worth? Inclusion: Do I leave my identity in the car park? Performance/Achievement: How is merit defined in this workplace? Cultural Competence: How comfortable am I around diversity? Social Justice: Have I examined my position on a range of social issues?


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