Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

F. Brown Wait time- Thinking Time children need time to think! Wait time was first introduced in the 1970’s by Mary Budd Rowe whose research showed the.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "F. Brown Wait time- Thinking Time children need time to think! Wait time was first introduced in the 1970’s by Mary Budd Rowe whose research showed the."— Presentation transcript:

1 F. Brown Wait time- Thinking Time children need time to think! Wait time was first introduced in the 1970’s by Mary Budd Rowe whose research showed the benefits of allowing silence in terms of quality and quantity of learner’s responses. With wait time-thinking time children’s answers were longer and had more correct responses, they decreased the number of “I don’t know responses” and more students participated in conversations. By allowing children think time you communicate that -thinking is important -it allows young thinkers to take information from others, teacher or child. - it allows time to process information, reflect on it and make connections to their own thinking.

2 F. Brown Wait Time- Think Time in Grade 5/6B 2010 First we looked at why we needed think time-wait time. We reviewed why substantive conversations were important in our classroom Next we decided what wait time would look like in our classroom and we made up our own class rules. Then we began to use this strategy all the time. There are no hands up in our classroom because we all know to wait and think first. Our conversations have become longer, less teacher directed and more children are joining in the conversations.

3 F. Brown Wait Time 5/6 B 2010 Wait time …. Gives us more time to think, which leads to better answers and using better vocabulary. Allows everyone time to think Gives us an opportunity to formulate an answer or idea. Gives us a chance to find multiple answers. Gives us more chance to have the ‘right’ answer. Gives us a chance to ‘take a risk’ Allows everyone to ‘have a go’ Fast thinkers always get picked- this way everyone has equal opportunity. Allows more people to a have a say. Allows us time to remember Allows us to learn from each other. Allows us time to correct our thinking.

4 F. Brown The next slides show you our class developed anchor charts about wait time.

5 F. Brown A good question should have many answers. This leads to good, substantive conversations. Good questions lead to good answers Questions should be descriptive. This allows for many answers. If we use open questions we have more options for answers. Take time to make up good questions and to answer them. Don’t forget the detail. ASK GOOD QUESTIONS

6 F. Brown Close your eyes. Don’t talk– THINK Allow time to come up with answers. Pause Hands down– no one is to answer straight away. ALLOW SILENCE

7 F. Brown LISTEN CAREFULLY Show you value other people’s opinions. Look at the person who is speaking to you. Make eye contact. If you don’t listen you can’t follow people’s conversations or instructions. It is rude, poor manners if you don’t listen. Don’t fidget. Don’t day dream STOP! Don’t talk over others. Listen and take in what is being said.

8 F. Brown CONVERSATION SKILLS Show you value other people’s opinions. Look at the person who is speaking to you. Make eye contact. If you don’t listen you can’t follow people’s conversations or instructions. It is rude, poor manners if you don’t listen. Don’t fidget. Don’t day dream STOP! Don’t talk over others. Listen and take in what is being said.


Download ppt "F. Brown Wait time- Thinking Time children need time to think! Wait time was first introduced in the 1970’s by Mary Budd Rowe whose research showed the."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google