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Samuel T. Busansky School Celebrates Juneteenth Amistad Exemplary Practice Committee Members: Mrs. Eldrean Attaway, PrincipalMr. George Joseph, Reading.

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Presentation on theme: "Samuel T. Busansky School Celebrates Juneteenth Amistad Exemplary Practice Committee Members: Mrs. Eldrean Attaway, PrincipalMr. George Joseph, Reading."— Presentation transcript:

1 Samuel T. Busansky School Celebrates Juneteenth Amistad Exemplary Practice Committee Members: Mrs. Eldrean Attaway, PrincipalMr. George Joseph, Reading Specialist Mrs. Cathy Wishart, Literacy CoachMrs. Kathy Hann, Reading Recovery Mrs. Dionne Collins, 4th Gr. TeacherMrs. Kristen Ludman, Special Ed. Teacher Mrs. Ruth McPherson, Teaching Assistant Technical Support: Mrs. Betty Milton, Technology Coordinator

2 Juneteenth Celebration Facts Did you know that the Emancipation Proclamation that ended slavery in the United States was signed in January 1863? Did you know that, even though the Civil War was officially over in April 1865, people enslaved in Texas did not know? Did you know that the people enslaved in Texas finally found out they were free on June 19, 1865? Did you know that African-Americans still commemorate June 19th by having Juneteenth Celebrations each year?

3 The Juneteenth Story The Emancipation Proclamation was signed on September 22, 1862 to become effective January 1, 1863, ending slavery in the United States. But many people were still enslaved long after this date. “Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865, the day Union General Gordon Granger and 2,000 federal troops arrived on Galveston Island to take possession of the state and enforce the emancipation of its slaves. Legend has it while standing on the balcony of Galveston’s Ashton Villa, Granger read the contents of ‘General Order No. 3’” (Wikipedia, “Juneteenth”). Of course, the enslaved people were elated. They began dancing in the streets to celebrate the news. The freed people soon learned that they were the last to learn of their freedom. In celebration of their new rights, the very next year African-Americans in Texas began celebrating Juneteenth (short for June 19) the very next year and have been celebrating this joyous news ever since. Source:

4 Busansky’s Celebration Students were given brief “biographies” of actual slaves who lived during the Civil War. Most of the information was accurate. Working in pairs, students read the “biographies” and talked about the life of their slave. Students then pretended to be the slave and wrote a thank you note to General Granger for delivering the news of their freedom. On the following slides, you will find some of the letters written by Busansky students. The letters are signed using the name of the slave being depicted.

5 Dear General Granger… My name is Clayton Holbert. I am an ex- slave. I would like to thank you because you set me free. Thank you because it was hard work on the plantation raising crops. I want you to know how grateful I am for you setting me free. You should be proud. From, Clayton Holbert

6 Dear General Granger… 6/5/08 Thank you General for all that you have done by freeing the slaves. If it weren’t for, you people would still be slaves. I spent most of my life time a slave. I am 79 or 80 years old. I belonged to master Bill. I lived on that plantation for many years. Every one is thankful for what you have done for the slaves. Sincerely, Emma

7 Dear General Granger… Thank you for freeing all of the slave. Thank you for writing about me. I hope you read this letter. You’re a good person. Thanks for giving everyone freedom. I’m glad to be free to make friends and have fun free. You’re my hero for saving all the slaves.

8 Dear General Granger… Thank you for telling me I was free. Why did the taskmaster tell Mose to whip people instead of doing it himself? Why did the taskmaster whip a fifteen year old boy? And why did the taskmaster hit a thirteen year old gal so hard she nearly died? Again thank you for telling me I was free. Thank you for what you’ve done for the slaves. Thank you a lot. Sincerely, Walter Calloway

9 Dear General Granger… My name is Isom Mosely. Thank you for letting us know that slaves were free. Thank you for letting us keep some of our land. I am very happy now. Thank you, Isom Mosely

10 Dear General Granger…

11 Hi my name is Walter Callaway. I have a brother and mother but, we were split up when I was sold to master John. In the time of slavery, I was not so happy. So I set off to find my siblings. I want to thank you for telling my master that the slaves are free, so thank you. Love, Walter Calloway

12 Dear General Granger… We thank you for freeing us. We are glad we are free. Maybe we can find my aunt. I really miss her. Thank you, General Granger. Love, Betty Crofter

13 Dear General Granger… Thank you for telling us we were free. I am 79 years old. I do not remember anything that much. We have been hoping and praying for this day. I love being free. Thank you again. Your friend, Emma Crockett

14 Dear General Granger… My name is Lucinda Davis. I was a slave. I lived in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I was controlled by my mistress, Nancy. Thank you for freeing me from slavery. My life is much better than it was before. Now I can be free to work and play as I choose. Yours truly, Lucinda Davis

15 Dear General Granger… My name is Joseph Holmes. I would like to say thank you for Emancipation Proclamation because my master Miss Daisy makes my family and me work every day of the week. If one of the slaves was lazy, she would sell them to another owner. Since your soldier told us we were free we never had to work for anyone again unless they paid us for the work.. So thank you for your kindness General Granger. Sincerely yours, Joseph Holmes

16 Dear General Granger… Hi, my name is Isom Mosely. I thank you for telling us about the law that passed. We really enjoy our freedom here in the U.S.A. My family and I are really happy to have our freedom. My family and I like to having you in the U.S.A. Sincerely, Isom Mosely

17 Dear General Granger… Hi, this is Clayton Holbert and I just want to say thank you for all you have done. I just want to say thank you for our freedom because I did not like the condition we were in before. You’re such a kind, loving, and respectful person for actually setting me free from slavery. I’m so happy because I never knew someone like you would have so much love for our kind. Yours truly, Clayton Holbert

18 Dear General Granger… My name is Isom MoseIy. Thank you for Juneteenth. Now we are not slaves anymore. Now I can make some money. Now I can get a job and get paid. Now I can do what ever I want! Your friend, Isom

19 Dear General Granger… Thank you for freeing the U.S.A. We are glad we don’t have to be any ones slave. My name is Walter Calloway. Your Friend, Walter Calloway P.S how did you get so clever?

20 Dear General Granger… Thank you for our freedom. I am Walter Calloway. I am writing this because you made me free. If you did not give me that information I would still be suffering. I hated getting beaten by the master, John. He had a lot of slaves on his plantation. He was good enough to us, but if we did not suit him he would beat us bad. Thank you, Walter Calloway

21 Dear General Granger… My name is Walter Calloway. I am from Virginia. Thank you very much for freeing us for being a slave. We are glad that we are not a slave. Because you help us to be free. Thank you for freeing us very much. I am having a nice life. Walter Calloway

22 Dear General Granger… My name is Emma Crackett. I wish I could speak good English. Thank you for all you have done.

23 Dear General Granger… Thank you for setting us free. We really appreciate it. If you were still alive we would help you since you helped us. I can’t believe you set all of us free. You rock. How did you do it? You must be happy that you set us all free. Plus you went down in history.

24 Dear General Granger… My name is Lucinda Davis I live in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I don’t know where I was born. Nobody ever told me. But mammy and pappy came to Texas after the war. The man at the creek Indian helped me. My mistress, her name was Nancy. I was glad when the general found me. Thank you, Lucinda Davis

25 Dear General Granger… My name is Betty Cofer. Thank you for saving me from slavery. I felt excited that day. Now that I am free I will be able to get a paying job. I will also find a place to live. When I get paid I plan to buy new clothes. Thank you for freedom. Your friend, Betty Cofer

26 Dear General Granger… I am Lucinda Davis. I live in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I’m thanking you for freeing me from slavery. I belonged to a Creek Indian and I don’t know a lot of English. I don’t know where I was born. It would help if you can tell me where my mammy and pappy are PLEASE!!! Thank you for all your help. Please send me a letter back. Love, Lucinda Davis

27 Dear General Granger… Thank you for telling us we are free. I was 31 years old when you told us that we were free. My masters had wheat, cotton, tobacco, horses, cows, hogs, and sheep. Mammy Rachel stayed in the dyeing room (she used to dye the wool different colors). Thanks once again. Your friend, Tempe Herndon Durham

28 Dear General Granger… Thank you for setting us free. My name is Clayton Holbert and I want to thank you for setting us free. When you said you were setting us free,I was eighty-six years old. At the end of the Civil war I was working in the fields in the state of Texas. We grew corn, barley, and cotton. I give you all my thanks for setting us free and letting us live a real life. Sincerely, Clayton Holbert

29 Dear General Granger… I am Walter Calloway. I am sorry to bother you, but we just want to say THANK YOU. You helped us by fighting for us while things were tough. You never gave up - you kept going. Now you set us free. So thank you again for our freedom. Now I can get a job and get paid. Sincerely, Walter Calloway.

30 Dear General Granger… I am from Tulsa, Oklahoma. I am glad that you finally told the slaves they were freed from slavery. It took 2.5 years for us to become free after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. I want to thank you for telling the slaves we were free because our masters would not tell us. Thank you, Lucinda Davis

31 Dear General Granger… I am Emma Crockett. I’m sending this letter to you because I want to thank you for spreading the news of freedom. But I want to tell you a little bit about my history of being a slave. After working in fields and in the master’s house, I’ve learned how to take care of my self. I still have scars from being whipped and being just being harmed for many years. And I almost starved to death but my husband Henry all ways gave a me a piece of bread. But when the word of freedom came out I was so happy I stopped breathing but I knew life would change for a fact.

32 Dear General Granger… Thank you for Emancipation Proclamation. Without it the slaves could not be free. Thank you for coming to Texas and telling us we are now free. Thanks again for telling us were free now. Were glad we are free.

33 Dear General Granger… My name is Clayton Holbert. My master owned a big plantation until you freed us. The plantation took about 100 slaves to run. I believe that you did the right thing. So thank you for our freedom and thanks for trying to make our world a better place. Sincerely, Clayton

34 Dear General Granger… I am Isom Mosely, and I was a slave until you freed me and others. Thank you for freeing the slaves including me,and now I am finally free.We are all very thankful that you have freed us. So thank you very much.I was a slave now I’m free!!! Yours Truly, Isom Mosely

35 Dear General Granger… My name is Clayton Holber. Thank you for saving me from working a lot. Maybe you can find my father and uncle. Who did you fight? You saved a lot of slaves! How did you get clever? Thank you for saving our people. Your Friend, Clayton Holber

36 Dear General Granger… Thank you for my freedom. I’m glad I don’t have to worry about getting beaten anymore, or worry about doing work. Maybe I can learn how to speak English better. The Creek Indian Agency helped me but not enough. I thank you for telling us. I appreciate it!

37 Dear General Granger… Thank you for freeing us. A little bit later, I was sent on to a plantation in Texas. It was so hot down there. We are so happy that we are not slave anymore. First I didn’t know I was a slave. Once again thank you for freeing us. Your friend, Lucinda

38 Dear General Granger… I am Joseph Holmes. I am one of the slaves you freed. Thank you for freeing us. If you didn’t come we would have suffered. I always wanted to be free. Now that you did that, I feel like my whole life has changed. Thanks to you I am free. Sincerely, Joseph Holmes

39 Dear General Granger… Thank you for telling us that we where free. We are glad that you let all of us be free because they treated us badly. We are glad that we are not someone’s slave again. » Your friend » Isom Mosely

40 Dear General Granger… Dear General Granger, Thank you General Granger for telling us we can finally stop being scared of getting beat. You have helped us stop sleeping on hard beds. You’ve stopped a lot of us from getting killed. Now we can eat as much as we want and live in a comfortable home. Now we don’t have to hide. We can be free. Thank you, Tempe

41 Dear General Granger… My name is Emma Crockett I want to take this time to tell you thank you for setting us free. I am 79 or 80 and I used to belong to Master Bill Hawkins and Miss Betty. I am married with five children. I don’t know much I never had a proper education. All I know is there was bad times and folks got whipped back then. All I know now is I can think up more tales and old songs. Thank you one more time for all your kindness in setting us free. God Bless, Emma Crockett

42 Dear General Granger… Thanks for what you did for us and you saved our lives from those bounty hunters and we are grateful. Sincerely yours, Isom Mosley

43 Dear General Granger… Thank you for letting me free and not letting me get whipped every day. I am so happy to be free. I want to learn how to read and write. Every day I am thankful I am alive because many of us were killed. I was one of the lucky ones. I felt bad when I saw them get killed. Thanks once again for setting me free. I feel much better now that I am not one of the slaves. I really appreciate it. From: Emma Crockett

44 Dear General Granger… My name is Tempe Herndon Durham. Thank you for freedom. I was a slave and now I’m free. I feel excited. I will get a job, a house, and some clothes. Then I will move out of the country and find a new husband. Thank you for the good news of freedom. Sincerely, Tempe Herndon Durham


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