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2105 Laurel Bush Road, Suite 200 Bel Air, Maryland 21015 (443) 640-1075 Geospatial Enterprise Architecture What does it mean to me?

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Presentation on theme: "2105 Laurel Bush Road, Suite 200 Bel Air, Maryland 21015 (443) 640-1075 Geospatial Enterprise Architecture What does it mean to me?"— Presentation transcript:

1 2105 Laurel Bush Road, Suite 200 Bel Air, Maryland (443) Geospatial Enterprise Architecture What does it mean to me? and Why you should care! Tim Haithcoat Missouri Spatial Data Information Service

2 Slide 2 -- April 25, 2006 Have you been asked? How would you unify, simplify, stream-line, or consolidate state geo-operations? What elements of your agencies or organizations use geospatial technologies and why? How much is being spent on geospatial? Are you duplicating capability and data? Where are the opportunities to leverage investments in the geospatial arena? How can you reduce costs in hardware, software, and data resource acquisition, management, and use? What standards for geospatial data development, accuracy, or technology acquisition are you using?

3 Slide 3 -- April 25, 2006 Have your peers recognized that... Geographic information is used in a growing number of business settings in and outside of government Geographic information and services are not addressed consistently within and between organizations Interoperability among providers and consumers of geographic data and services requires a common understanding of terminology and functional capability/capacity Development of common multi-jurisdictional approaches to the use of geographic information and services requires inclusion in a state’s Enterprise Architecture initiatives Individual agencies developing internal geospatial architectures without specific participation in multi-agency / enterprise efforts Location-based services and Service Oriented Architectures being built in state government require geospatial information

4 Slide 4 -- April 25, 2006 Have you desired... to promote consideration of location as a component of agency business activities and processes to support description and sharing of geospatial resources across organizations both horizontally and vertically to build geospatial considerations into all aspects of agency enterprise architecture development to adopt existing guidelines, standards, and policies established by FGDC, OGC, and ISO for development, management, and use of geospatial resources to measure performance in the use and management of geospatial resources to assess program development across government for geospatial aspects so as to leverage these shared requirements for greater gain to compare where your state is to others in terms of geospatial maturity

5 Slide 5 -- April 25, 2006 Goals of EA Provide a structured approach to business process assessment and re-engineering Classification of business processes, data concepts, standards, services (components and interfaces) for each organization Reference framework to store models that explain the services and data behind them Opportunity to improve efficiencies within an organization Identify potential for services and data re-use for multiple purposes

6 Slide 6 -- April 25, 2006 FEA Reference Models Business Reference Model (BRM) –define mission-critical lines of business, business processes, and functions Performance Reference Model (PRM) developed to define measures of business performance Technical Reference Model (TRM) –identifies and describes the technology (components, interfaces) used to achieve the BRM Service Reference Model (SRM) defines the types and instances of services required to support processes Data Reference Model (DRM) – defines the data/information concepts, structures, definitions, and values or enumerations required by the BRM in the context of the TRM

7 Slide 7 -- April 25, 2006 Geospatial Community of Practice Convened a workgroup of federal and non-federal participants to develop a Geospatial Profile of the FEA –Affiliated with the Architecture and Infrastructure Committee (AIC) of the Federal CIO Council –Ad-hoc Working Group of the FGDC –Membership includes major federal agencies, state and local members, professional organizations (NSGIC, NACO, NASCIO, GITA)

8 Slide 8 -- April 25, 2006 Requirements for Geospatial Profile in Enterprise Architecture Geographic information is used in a majority of business settings in and outside of government Geographic information and services are not addressed consistently within and between organizations Interoperability among providers and consumers of geographic data and services requires a common understanding of semantics and functional capabilities Development of common multi-jurisdictional / organizational approaches to the use of geographic information and services requires inclusion in Enterprise Architecture

9 Slide 9 -- April 25, 2006 FEA Geospatial Profile v1 Companion to Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA) Reference Models to recognize and promote the pervasive nature of geospatial capabilities in lines of business across government Audience: Agency chief architects and CIO staff in federal, state, or local government Objective: to develop consistent methodology to call-out geospatial elements of all aspects of government business Format: 60 page document with many resource annexes

10 Geospatial Security & Privacy Records Management Economic Development Education Community and Social Services Health Human Resources Financial Management Natural Resources Homeland Security Agencies Lines of Business Profiles

11 Slide April 25, 2006 Initiative History & Status, April 2006 Drafted a Charter for a Geospatial WG under the FGDC and CIO AIC, refined work plan Convened writing teams for the Introduction section, and to provide geospatial guidance for each of the relevant FEA Reference Models Posted Version 1.0 Draft of Geospatial Profile 10January2006 Plan evaluation pilot to interpret Profile in context of common event. Pilot focused on homeland security and emergency information exchange in facilities - how they are defined, structured, and shared - rolling out currently Developing Next Steps for revision of Profile version targeted for early-mid summer Integrating with OMB’s newly launched Geospatial Line of Business activities

12 Slide April 25, 2006 Geospatial Profile V1 Outline Executive Summary Introduction to the Geospatial Profile –Objectives –Audience –Document Structure Introduction to Geospatial Concepts –Cross-cutting nature of geospatial –Overview of Geospatial Capabilities –The NSDI Business Reference Model Data Reference Model Service Components Reference Model Technology Reference Model Performance Reference Model and Maturity Model –Appendix A: References –Appendix B: Glossary –Appendix C: FEA Overview –Appendix D: Use Case and Scenarios –Appendix E: Geospatial Activity for BRM –Appendix F: Geospatial Business Language –Appendix G: Geospatial Service Components –Appendix H: Geospatial Standards List –Appendix I: Acronym List

13 Slide April 25, Introduction Opportunities for use of geospatial information and services Overview of the Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA) Objectives Audience Policy context: –OMB Circulars, Executive Order, E-Gov Act 2002 Document organization

14 Slide April 25, 2006 Objectives to promote consideration of location as a component of agency business activities and processes to support description and sharing of geospatial resources across organizations to build geospatial considerations into all aspects of agency enterprise architecture development. to reinforce existing guidelines, standards, and policies established by OMB, FGDC, and ISO for development, management, and use of geospatial resources to measure performance in the use and management of geospatial resources.

15 Slide April 25, Geospatial Concepts Geospatial information examples Geospatial services discussion NSDI –The National Map and Framework data –Geospatial One-Stop and Clearinghouse network

16 Slide April 25, Performance RM Goals: –Help produce enhanced performance information to improve strategic and daily decision-making –Improve the alignment and better articulate the contribution of inputs to outputs, thereby creating a clear “line of sight” to desired results –Identify performance improvement opportunities that span traditional organizational structures and boundaries

17 Slide April 25, 2006 PRM “Line of Sight” Strategic Outcomes

18 Slide April 25, 2006 Possible Areas to Measure Performance Mission and Business Results : This includes the Measurement Categories of Services for Citizens, Support Delivery of Services, and Management of Government Resources. Citizens and citizen services Institutional effectiveness Public participation and accountability Supports improved decision making Supports NSDI Customer Results : This includes the Measurement Categories of Customer Benefit, Service Coverage, Timeliness and Responsiveness, Service Quality, and Service Accessibility. Ease of use measures Broad data-sharing capabilities Data availability and accessibility

19 Slide April 25, 2006 Possible Areas to Measure Performance Processes and Activities : This includes the Measurement Categories of Financial, Productivity and Efficiency, Cycle time and Timeliness, Quality, Security and Privacy, and Management and Innovation. Coordination and Streamlining Efficient use of taxpayer resources Minimal barriers to obtaining data Interagency / Intergovernmental Collaboration Technology : This includes the Measurement Categories of Financial, Quality, Efficiency, Information and Data, Reliability and Availability, and Effectiveness. Reuse, adaptation, and consolidation IT performance Standards adoption Supports NSDI Purchasing of geospatial components

20 Slide April 25, Business RM Four Business Areas, 39 official Lines of Business*, many subordinate business activities Geospatial characteristics of specific business activities are highlighted in Appendix D. * RFI for a Geospatial LoB recently released!!

21 Slide April 25, 2006 FEA Business Reference Model

22 Slide April 25, 2006 Approach to evaluating geospatial aspects of business activities: –Analyze business activity descriptions to determine possible roles for location based information in the execution of the business activity. –Determine the function of geospatial data, technology, and services in carrying out those activities. –Develop or refine a business statement that describes the role of geospatial data and technologies in support of the business activity. Questions template to identify geospatial capabilities with subject experts

23 Slide April 25, 2006 Recommended geospatial business functions Development of geospatial policies, standards, and guidance Implement geospatial services with common and documented interfaces Dissemination of geospatial data to external users

24 Slide April 25, Data Reference Model Promotes data sharing and discovery through three capabilities exposed for agency data resources: –Data context (taxonomies) –Data sharing (exchange schema and format) –Data description (metadata) Full reconciliation with the FEA DRM version 2.X is not included in this Profile

25 Slide April 25, 2006 Data context (taxonomies) Spatial contexts exist to reference location using addresses, coordinates, grid reference systems, and place names ISO includes a Topic Category system for thematic content classification

26 Slide April 25, 2006 Data sharing (exchange) Use of Framework Data Content standards for exchange (ANSI/INCITS) Use of standard formats and services for exchange (OGC GML, WFS) Use of geospatial data formats for exchange

27 Slide April 25, 2006 Data description (metadata) Reference to FGDC Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (CSDGM) in active use Recommends future use of ISO and its XML encoding (ISO TS 19139) for the format and transfer of geospatial metadata

28 Slide April 25, Service Component Reference Model Defined as a “baseline for categorizing and aligning federal business applications into common, reusable Service Components, … categorized into appropriate service domains and service types.” Appendix F includes a table of SRM extensions that highlight candidate geospatial service components within existing domains/types

29 Slide April 25, 2006 FEA Service domains and types

30 Slide April 25, Technology RM The Geospatial TRM is intended to support three principal uses in conjunction with standards profiles: –Ensuring interoperability among internal and external systems and users –Guiding the design of system and technical architectures, and –Providing the basis for assessing architectural compliance for technical solutions.

31 Slide April 25, 2006 Geospatial aspects of TRM In the context of the TRM organization, geospatial standards and specifications are identified to improve interoperability in enterprise solutions –ISO, W3C, OGC, OASIS, FGDC and other standards are referenced

32 Slide April 25, 2006 Appendices References Glossary and acronyms Use case and scenarios Geospatial activity examples Geospatial Business Language Geospatial Service Components Geospatial Standards List Geospatial Integration Maturity Model

33 Slide April 25, 2006 Business Questions Is the activity associated with a place or a location? Would the addition of a “where” component to the business activity enhance the business operation? Does the activity description contain any of the following key words? Address (physical), address (postal), area, bearing, bearings, city, community, compass, country, direction, distance, district, domicile, event, facility, geography, house, household, incident, latitude, locale, locality, locate, location, longitude, neighborhood, pinpoint, place, point, port, position, post, property, region, reservation, residence, river reach, route, scene, site, situation, space, spot, station, street, suburb, terrain, territory, topography, town, tract, venue, vicinity, village, watershed, where, whereabouts, zip code, zone –If yes, then further questions should be asked to determine the role of that keyword in the activity.

34 Slide April 25, 2006 Business Questions (cont) Does the place/position/location/address have or could it have an impact on the way that an activity is conducted? In other words, does the activity vary by place/position/location/address or do the characteristics of a place/position/location/address impact the activity? –If yes, then further questions should be asked to elicit more about how that activity varies spatially and what geospatial information and services may be relevant to the activity. Does the activity require the use of or could it benefit from having a map/aerial photograph/satellite image? Would a map/aerial photograph/satellite image be helpful in the conduct of the activity or increase the effectiveness of individuals or groups conducting the activity?

35 Slide April 25, 2006 Business Questions (cont) Does the activity require the use of a Global Positioning System (GPS) or other location determining technology? Would the use of GPS or other location determining technology be helpful in the conduct of the activity or increase the effectiveness of individuals or groups conducting the activity? Does the activity require knowing the location of any of the actors in the activity? Is the location of the actor(s) changing and is ongoing knowledge of the location(s) useful to the activity? Does an individual or group conducting the activity need to know their location? Does an individual or group managing the activity need to know the location of the individual or group conducting the activity?

36 Slide April 25, 2006 Geospatial Business Language The Geospatial Business Language is comprised of five basic types of terms: 1.Application: A computer program with a user interface or computer program component that employs geospatial data and technology; a geospatial business process or sub- process that is implemented as a software program or program component. 2.Data: A geospatial information class, type or property. 3.Function: A geo-processing capability or user tool; a geospatial service component. 4.Process: A general series of business activities that employs geospatial data and technology. 5.Technology: An application of science that generates, displays, manages or otherwise processes geospatial data.

37 Slide April 25, 2006 Geospatial Integration Maturity Model At any given time, various organizations will be in different phases of integrating geospatial technologies, services, and data into their business and mainstream IT operations. The degree to which this incorporation has occurred can be measured through an integration maturity model. Comprised of eight (8) measurement categories assessed across six (6) levels of maturity (range 0-5) Influenced by NSGIC Model for Coordination of Geographic Information Technology, NASCIO EA Maturity Model, and OMB PART

38 Slide April 25, 2006 GIMM Measurement Categories Coordination—The level of organized coordination, collaboration, and leadership. Governance, Management, & Planning—The degree to which plans and strategies for geospatial components exist. Policies & Compliance—The existence and use of compliance–based processes for assessing consistency of integration, adoption, and service implementation. Enterprise Integration—The degree to which the geospatial aspects of business data are planned for, integrated, leveraged, and used to guide investments and initiatives. Data Acquisition, Documentation, & Maintenance—The stage of implementation of geospatial data lifecycle processes. Data Access & Distribution—The degree to which an organization maintains and improves users ability to search for, discover, and access geospatial data. Standards & Best Practices—The degree to which an organization adopts and complies with geospatial technology and process standards. Training & Skills Development—The level at which the organization is aware, understands, and communicates the potential utility and application of geospatial technologies.

39 Slide April 25, 2006 GIMM Levels Level 0 - No program Level 1 - Informal program Level 2 - Repeatable program Level 3 - Well defined program Level 4 - Managed program Level 5 - Continuously improving and vital program

40 Slide April 25, 2006 GIMM Category Coordination Level 0 - No geospatial coordination mechanisms; Geospatial IT activities pursued on a project-by-project basis. Level 1 - Project-based coordination by independent groups with common geospatial IT and data needs; Vested leader emerges for project duration Level 2 - Broad based coordination by organization with common geospatial IT and data needs; Volunteer coordinator leads organization to goal; No predictable pattern or frequency of coordination; dependent on availability of lead Level 3 - Unofficial Single Department Coordination; Key individuals act as coordinators with management approval; Level of facilitation and coordination depend on tenure of key persons and organizational leadership Level 4 - Official Coordination through a Geospatial Information Officer (GIO); Enterprise coordination to the extent granted by authorizing mandate Level 5 - Official Coordination through a Geospatial Information Officer (GIO); System is in place to ensure that established policies, guidelines and standards are followed, reviewed, and updated

41 Slide April 25, 2006 Next Steps Working on revised outline and content for Version 2.0 to be completed later in 2006 based on comments received through AIC/FEA PMO – Focus on Business Managers and relevance to that constituency group Conduct pilot project in two phases: –Interpretation of Profile by IT/business staff in several organizations new to the document –Implementation pilot of identified capabilities of common re- use potential among agencies

42 Slide April 25, 2006 Pilot of Geospatial EA Principles Pilot activity is proposed to interpret and deploy resources following the Geospatial Profile to support specific mission requirements using multiple-agency data and services –Interpret Profile in context of a common emergency management scenario with local, state, and federal players –Build on existing capabilities and commitments –Establish maintainable/sustainable capability –Provide comment back to Profile and FEA processes Planning sessions held in Jan-April 2006, probably to include federal agencies, North Carolina and other states, as well as local governments

43 Slide April 25, 2006


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