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Common Core ELA Foundational Skills Grade 2, Session 2 October 22, 2014 Presented by: Amanda H.K. Steiman, Ed.D

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Presentation on theme: "Common Core ELA Foundational Skills Grade 2, Session 2 October 22, 2014 Presented by: Amanda H.K. Steiman, Ed.D"— Presentation transcript:

1 Common Core ELA Foundational Skills Grade 2, Session 2 October 22, 2014 Presented by: Amanda H.K. Steiman, Ed.D

2 AGENDA Overview and Grade-Level Check In Phonological Awareness, Part 2 (beyond consonants, short and long vowel sounds) Phonics/Decoding, Part 2 – Special vowel and consonant sounds Multi-syllabic decoding – word analysis chart Syllable types (Part 1) Using the Word Analysis Chart Compound words and beyond Dictation and Spelling Teaching Tricky Words Grade-Level-Team Discussion and Commitments Closing and Evaluation Packet Page 1

3 Grade-Level Check-In 1.Review your notes or index card from Session 1 2.What did you try with your students in relation to the CCSS Foundational Skills? 3.How did it go? What suggestions do you have for your colleagues? 4.Discuss what you tried with your table. Jot notes from their suggestions. 5.If you have an unanswered question, concern, or particular strategy you would like modeled, please jot it on a post-it note and give to Danielle. Packet Page 2

4 Today’s Objectives You will leave with… A deeper knowledge of Gr. 2 standards for Common Core Foundational Skills Strategies for teaching special vowel sounds and consonant spellings A strategy for teaching students to decode multisyllabic words An awareness of how to use dictation for building spelling fluency Strategies for teaching “Tricky” and “Sight” Words A specific action plan before you return on Jan. 28 Memories of collaborative work with colleagues

5 Norms for Collaborative Learning Listen to understand Watch (share) airtime Be fully present (start and end on time; silence electronics) Honor all voices; invite different perspectives Be open to new ideas Return to large group when signaled

6 Teaching English Language Arts (SSSR): Focus of our Sessions StructuresStandardsStrategiesResources

7 Concepts of Print Phonemic Awareness Alphabetic Knowledge/Phonics Decoding & Word Structure Vocabulary Fluency/Automaticity Comprehension

8 f Print to Speech StoriesWord Letter vs. Word Parts of a Book Direction - ality Purpose of Print Form--case, size, font, color Rhyming Beginning Sounds: Same/ Different Beginning Sound Isolation Ending Sound Isolation Sound Blending Sound Manipulation Phoneme Segmentation Letter Names- Uppercase Consonant Sounds Short Vowel Sounds Alphabetic Principle Letter Names- Lowercase Long Vowel Sounds CVC Word s R&L Controlled Vowels Long Vowel Words Multisyllabic Words Consonant Blend Words Sight Words Vowel Diphthongs Digraphs, Trigraphs Affixes Accuracy Rate Expression & Intonation Text Vocabulary Academic Language Syntactical Structures Background Knowledge Text Structure Comprehension Strategies Monitor Question Clarify Confusion Be metacognitive Use text clues InferSummarize Verify Predictions Synthesize Visualize CCSS Foundational Skills CCSS Foundational Skills

9 RF.1.2- Phonological Awareness Standards (1 st grade standard)

10 Phonological and Phonemic Awareness What is it? Syllable Segmentation (clap, count) Rhyme (oral cloze) Beginning, middle, ending sounds (same/different) Beginning, middle, ending sound isolation Sound blending Sound segmenting Sound manipulation Sound substitution Phonological Awareness Phonemic Awareness

11 Building sound-spelling connections From Pinterest Packet Pages 3-4

12 Phonemic Awareness with Special Sounds Special Vowel SoundsConsonant Digraphs MoonCh – cheese, which BookSh- ship, fish House, brownTh- think, teeth (Voiceless) Paws, Faucet, salt, wallTh – the, bathe (voiced) Boy, coinWh – whistle ParkNg – ring CorkNk – sink Her, bird, turn, wordPh – photo Few, cube/zh/ - treasure Packet Page 5

13 With long and special vowels… Apples and Bananas I like to eat I like to eat, eat apples and bananas. I like to eat I like to eat, eat apples and bananas.

14 With special vowels and consonant digraphs Stand up when you hear this sound, hear this sound, hear this sound… Stand up when you hear this sound, /ch/ /ch/ /ch/ /ch/ /ch/ /aw/ /aw//aw//aw//aw/ To the tune of: Mary had a little lamb

15 With special vowels and consonant digraphs--Picture Sorts 5+3=8 z /zh/

16 What sounds are difficult for your students? What activities can you do/do you do to help them hear and say the sounds? Special Vowel SoundsConsonant Digraphs MoonCh – cheese, which BookSh- ship, fish House, brownTh- think, teeth (Voiceless) Paws, Faucet, salt, wallTh – the, bathe (voiced) Boy, coinWh – whistle ParkNg – ring CorkNk – sink Her, bird, turn, wordPh – photo Few, cube/zh/ - treasure

17 Word Work Strategies At A Glance Last SessionToday’s Session 1. Phonemic Awareness5. Compound Words 2. Sound/Symbol Combinations 6. Syllabication 3. Word Blending7. Prefixes and Suffixes 4. Chaining8. Multisyllabic Decoding 9. Dictation/ Spelling Packet p. 6

18 Two Kinds of Word Sorts By SpellingBy Sound hair bear chair care Spare where pear very Moon book soon clue food screw stood goose foot Packet p. 7

19 Building Decoding Stamina

20 Multisyllabic Decoding, Part 1 un der pack ing space ship RF2.3 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words. 2.3c Decode regularly spelled two-syllable words with long vowels. 2.3d Decode words with common prefixes and suffixes.

21 The Multisyllabic Stool 1. Structural Analysis - Endings, Contractions, Possessives, Plurals, Compounds, Abbreviations 2. Morphemic Analysis—the meaning of the word parts. 3. Syllabication Patterns—knowing the common places where syllables divide helps me pronounce unfamiliar words. 4. Schwa—Schwa is the most common sound in English. Sounds like a short u—uh. Schwa appears in almost every multisyllabic word. Packet p. 8

22 TypeSyllable DescriptionExamples ClosedThese syllables end in a consonant. The vowel sound is generally short. rabbit, napkin OpenThese syllables end in a vowel. The vowel sound is generally long. tiger, pilot R- controlled When a vowel is followed by r, the letter affects the sound of the vowel. The vowel and the r appear in the same syllable. bird, turtle Vowel team Many vowel sounds are spelled with vowel digraphs such as ai, ay, ea, ee, oa, ow, oo, oi, oy, ou, ie, and ei. The vowel digraphs appear in the same syllable. boat, explain Vowel- silent e These generally represent long-vowel sounds.compete, decide Consonant -le Usually when -le appears at the end of a word and is preceded by a consonant, the consonant plus -le form the final syllable. table, little Packet p. 9

23 Teaching Syllable Generalizations 1. Closed syllables rabbit rab/bit rab*bit

24 Open or Closed ? Write cabin on the board, but do not read the word aloud or ask students to say the word at this time. Write ca | bin and cab | in underneath cabin. Explain that both of these are ways students might try chunking the letters into syllables. Tell students, “I am going to say a sentence using this word. I want you to listen carefully and then decide how to read and say this word.” Say “My family and I are going camping in the woods this weekend and we are going to stay in a.” Point to the syllables of the first word and model how to sound out each syllable as it is divided. Ca | bin is pronounced /kae/ /bin/, with the (long vowel) /ae/ sound. Now point to the syllables in the second word cab in and model sounding out the word as it is divided /kab/ /in/ with the /a/ sound. Ask students which pronunciation makes sense. (cab | in) Circle cab | in. Review the spelling patterns of the long /ae/ versus the short /a/ sound, i.e., ‘a’ is pronounced /ae/ at the end of the syllable and /a/ if there are consonants on either side. Unit 3 Lesson 4, p. 35 cabin ca / bincab / in

25 Experiencing the Word Analysis Chart inhospitable xx inablehospit inablehos pit hos pit inhospitable

26 Word Analysis Chart Print word Is it a compound word? Is there a prefix or suffix? Then bring down the rest. Divide into syllables (can leave a suffix intact). Read word fluently. Give brief definition.

27 Decoding phonetically-regular two- syllable words Use the Word Analysis Chart to practice teaching the following multi-syllable words that are part of the EngageNY/Amplify reading materials – driveway – training – explained – mistakes Remember: Choose just two words or spend 5 minutes per day to practice multi-syllabic words that students will encounter in text. Soon, students will begin to use the strategy on their own, and you can eventually minimize or eliminate this piece.

28 Dictation and Spelling L.2.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. c. Use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently occurring possessives. d. Generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words (e.g., cage  badge; boy  boil).

29 Dictation with Common Spelling Patterns 1.Basic Code – most common spellings – Sound by sound (hold up one finger per sound) – Students count the sounds and draw that number of lines – If a sound is represented by two letters, remind students of that code – It’s NOT a test – you can help students, but you want them to ask if they’re not sure (this helps students internalize the correct spelling, rather than writing an incorrect spelling repeatedly)

30 Example: Dictation with Words Unit 1, Lesson 30

31 Example: Dictation with Phrases/ Sentences Expand from individual words to phrases and sentences Every word in the phrase or sentence should either be phonetically regular or a tricky/sight word that has been previously taught Same rules of dictation apply

32 Independent Practice Look at the Pausing Point activities selected from Unit 2 Think about your students and their needs Select one activity to try out at your table Also, think about how you could adapt the activities to be done independently or in small groups (centers)

33 Teaching “Tricky” and “Sight” Words Tricky words—not completely phonetically regular (e.g., of, have, the, two, once, one, was) Sight words—may be phonetically regular using an Advanced Code (e.g., he, be, she, I), but should be taught before the Advanced Code has been learned

34 Teaching Tricky Words would could should These words are phonetically irregular – their vowel sound is the same as in “look”

35 Woulda, coulda, shoulda “I wish I could go to the beach,” whined Ann. “I would really like to go!” “If you want to go,” said Mom, “you should stop whining and finish your work. Then maybe we will have time to go.” “Okay,” said Ann. “If I could just play music while I work, it would be more fun!” “That should be okay,” said Mom. “I think Pam would like to go too. You should go ask her after you finish your work.” “Now if we could just stop for ice cream on the way, it would be a perfect day!” Ann said.

36 Woulda, coulda, shoulda “I wish I could go to the beach,” whined Ann. “I would really like to go!” “If you want to go,” said Mom, “you should stop whining and finish your work. Then maybe we will have time to go.” “Okay,” said Ann. “If I could just play music while I work, it would be more fun!” “That should be okay,” said Mom. “I think Pam would like to go too. You should go ask her after you finish your work.” “Now if we could just stop for ice cream on the way, it would be a perfect day!” Ann said.

37 Woulda, coulda, shoulda “I wish I could go to the beach,” whined Ann. “I would really like to go!” “If you want to go,” said Mom, “you should stop whining and finish your work. Then maybe we will have time to go.” “Okay,” said Ann. “If I could just play music while I work, it would be more fun!” “That should be okay,” said Mom. “I think Pam would like to go too. You should go ask her after you finish your work.” “Now if we could just stop for ice cream on the way, it would be a perfect day!” Ann said.

38 Woulda, coulda, shoulda “I wish I could go to the beach,” whined Ann. “I would really like to go!” “If you want to go,” said Mom, “you should stop whining and finish your work. Then maybe we will have time to go.” “Okay,” said Ann. “If I could just play music while I work, it would be more fun!” “That should be okay,” said Mom. “I think Pam would like to go too. You should go ask her after you finish your work.” “Now if we could just stop for ice cream on the way, it would be a perfect day!” Ann said.

39 Woulda, coulda, shoulda “I wish I could go to the beach,” whined Ann. “I would really like to go!” “If you want to go,” said Mom, “you should stop whining and finish your work. Then maybe we will have time to go.” “Okay,” said Ann. “If I could just play music while I work, it would be more fun!” “That should be okay,” said Mom. “I think Pam would like to go too. You should go ask her after you finish your work.” “Now if we could just stop for ice cream on the way, it would be a perfect day!” Ann said.

40 Woulda, coulda, shoulda “I wish I could go to the beach,” whined Ann. “I would really like to go!” “If you want to go,” said Mom, “you should stop whining and finish your work. Then maybe we will have time to go.” “Okay,” said Ann. “If I could just play music while I work, it would be more fun!” “That should be okay,” said Mom. “I think Pam would like to go too. You should go ask her after you finish your work.” “Now if we could just stop for ice cream on the way, it would be a perfect day!” Ann said.

41 Woulda, coulda, shoulda “I wish I could go to the beach,” whined Ann. “I would really like to go!” “If you want to go,” said Mom, “you should stop whining and finish your work. Then maybe we will have time to go.” “Okay,” said Ann. “If I could just play music while I work, it would be more fun!” “That should be okay,” said Mom. “I think Pam would like to go too. You should go ask her after you finish your work.” “Now if we could just stop for ice cream on the way, it would be a perfect day!” Ann said.

42 Woulda, coulda, shoulda “I wish I could go to the beach,” whined Ann. “I would really like to go!” “If you want to go,” said Mom, “you should stop whining and finish your work. Then maybe we will have time to go.” “Okay,” said Ann. “If I could just play music while I work, it would be more fun!” “That should be okay,” said Mom. “I think Pam would like to go too. You should go ask her after you finish your work.” “Now if we could just stop for ice cream on the way, it would be a perfect day!” Ann said.

43 Woulda, coulda, shoulda “I wish I could go to the beach,” whined Ann. “I would really like to go!” “If you want to go,” said Mom, “you should stop whining and finish your work. Then maybe we will have time to go.” “Okay,” said Ann. “If I could just play music while I work, it would be more fun!” “That should be okay,” said Mom. “I think Pam would like to go too. You should go ask her after you finish your work.” “Now if we could just stop for ice cream on the way, it would be a perfect day!” Ann said.

44 Woulda, coulda, shoulda “I wish I could go to the beach,” whined Ann. “I would really like to go!” “If you want to go,” said Mom, “you should stop whining and finish your work. Then maybe we will have time to go.” “Okay,” said Ann. “If I could just play music while I work, it would be more fun!” “That should be okay,” said Mom. “I think Pam would like to go too. You should go ask her after you finish your work.” “Now if we could just stop for ice cream on the way, it would be a perfect day!” Ann said.

45 Woulda, coulda, shoulda “I wish I could go to the beach,” whined Ann. “I would really like to go!” “If you want to go,” said Mom, “you should stop whining and finish your work. Then maybe we will have time to go.” “Okay,” said Ann. “If I could just play music while I work, it would be more fun!” “That should be okay,” said Mom. “I think Pam would like to go too. You should go ask her after you finish your work.” “Now if we could just stop for ice cream on the way, it would be a perfect day!” Ann said.

46 Grade-Level-Team Work We have practiced Phonemic Awareness skills, Multisyllabic Decoding skills and Tricky Word skills. Review your packet. Share with people at your table: “One thing that stood out to me today was ______ because ______.” Discuss with your table: What is one skill or strategy I can commit to teaching or using before I return on January 20th? Packet Page 23

47 A specific action plan before you return in October 1.What will you try before Jan. 20th? 2.What will you bring back to share with the group? 3.What support would you like from the District ELA Coach? 4.Write your name and School Name on the other side of the index card. I will ______ before Jan. 20th. I will bring back ______. I would like help with ______. On back: Name and School

48 Closure Please leave your index card on the table Please complete the individual Evaluation Form and leave on the table (include any questions or topics you would like addressed in future sessions). Thank you for coming. See you on Jan. 28th! Happy Holidays (all of them)! Packet Page 24


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