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The Saddest Noise, the Sweetest Noise. The saddest noise, the sweetest noise, The maddest noise that grows, -- The birds, they make it in the spring,

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Presentation on theme: "The Saddest Noise, the Sweetest Noise. The saddest noise, the sweetest noise, The maddest noise that grows, -- The birds, they make it in the spring,"— Presentation transcript:

1 The Saddest Noise, the Sweetest Noise

2 The saddest noise, the sweetest noise, The maddest noise that grows, -- The birds, they make it in the spring, At night's delicious close. Between the March and April line -- That magical frontier Beyond which summer hesitates, Almost too heavenly near. It makes us think of all the dead That sauntered with us here, By separation's sorcery Made cruelly more dear. It makes us think of what we had, And what we now deplore. We almost wish those siren throats Would go and sing no more. An ear can break a human heart As quickly as a spear, We wish the ear had not a heart So dangerously near

3 Analysis BLUE PEN: which technical features and meaning can you find?

4 Analysis BLACK PEN: Can you find: enjambment syntax - error or line of interest sibilance modality paradox tetrameter tetrimeter internal rhyme lexical chain

5 Analysis RED PEN: add the missing technical details and ideas.

6 The saddest noise, the sweetest noise, The maddest noise that grows, -- The birds, they make it in the spring, At night's delicious close.

7 The saddest noise, the sweetest noise, The maddest noise that grows, -- The birds, they make it in the spring, At night's delicious close. sibilance in line 1 sibilance draws our attention to the sound of the line and slows the pace

8 The saddest noise, the sweetest noise, The maddest noise that grows, -- The birds, they make it in the spring, At night's delicious close. sibilance in line 1 sibilance draws our attention to the sound of the line and slows the pace repetition of noise further draws our attention to sound

9 The saddest noise, the sweetest noise, The maddest noise that grows, -- The birds, they make it in the spring, At night's delicious close. sibilance in line 1 sibilance draws our attention to the sound of the line and slows the pace repetition of noise further draws our attention to sound full rhyme lines 2 & 4 draws attention to the increasing sound without yet stating what the noise is

10 The saddest noise, the sweetest noise, The maddest noise that grows, -- The birds, they make it in the spring, At night's delicious close. sibilance in line 1 sibilance draws our attention to the sound of the line and slows the pace repetition of noise further draws our attention to sound full rhyme lines 2 & 4 draws attention to the increasing sound without yet stating what the noise is Paradox how can something be both sad and sweet?

11 The saddest noise, the sweetest noise, The maddest noise that grows, -- The birds, they make it in the spring, At night's delicious close. sibilance in line 1 sibilance draws our attention to the sound of the line and slows the pace repetition of noise further draws our attention to sound full rhyme lines 2 & 4 draws attention to the increasing sound without yet stating what the noise is internal rhyme increases the sound devices in this opening stanza and draws attention to the opening paradox Paradox how can something be both sad and sweet?

12 The saddest noise, the sweetest noise, The maddest noise that grows, -- The birds, they make it in the spring, At night's delicious close. sibilance in line 1 sibilance draws our attention to the sound of the line and slows the pace repetition of noise further draws our attention to sound full rhyme lines 2 & 4 draws attention to the increasing sound without yet stating what the noise is internal rhyme increases the sound devices in this opening stanza and draws attention to the opening paradox Paradox how can something be both sad and sweet? allusion to lovers birds, spring and night all remind us of lovers

13 Between the March and April line -- That magical frontier Beyond which summer hesitates, Almost too heavenly near.

14 Between the March and April line -- That magical frontier Beyond which summer hesitates, Almost too heavenly near. lexical chain links the change of season with geographic or political borders; ‘between’ suggests a no-man’s-land

15 Between the March and April line -- That magical frontier Beyond which summer hesitates, Almost too heavenly near. lexical chain links the change of season with geographic or political borders; ‘between’ suggests a no-man’s-land personification summer is personified as someone just out of reach

16 Between the March and April line -- That magical frontier Beyond which summer hesitates, Almost too heavenly near. lexical chain links the change of season with geographic or political borders; ‘between’ suggests a no-man’s-land personification summer is personified as someone just out of reach syntax enjambment of 2 nd and 3 rd increases pace which is then slowed by comma after ‘hesitates’ causing the reader to hesitate at the end of the line 

17 Between the March and April line -- That magical frontier Beyond which summer hesitates, Almost too heavenly near. lexical chain links the change of season with geographic or political borders; ‘between’ suggests a no-man’s-land personification summer is personified as someone just out of reach syntax enjambment of 2 nd and 3 rd increases pace which is then slowed by comma after ‘hesitates’ causing the reader to hesitate at the end of the line  modality neutral and high modality of ‘almost’ and ‘too’ juxtaposed echoing the paradox of ‘saddest’ and ‘sweetest’ in stanza 1

18 It makes us think of all the dead That sauntered with us here, By separation's sorcery Made cruelly more dear.

19 It makes us think of all the dead That sauntered with us here, By separation's sorcery Made cruelly more dear. narrative voice use of 1 st person plural includes reader in the emotional experience of the poem

20 It makes us think of all the dead That sauntered with us here, By separation's sorcery Made cruelly more dear. narrative voice use of 1 st person plural includes reader in the emotional experience of the poem lexical chain ‘sorcery’ links with ‘magical’ of previous stanza

21 It makes us think of all the dead That sauntered with us here, By separation's sorcery Made cruelly more dear. narrative voice use of 1 st person plural includes reader in the emotional experience of the poem lexical chain ‘sorcery’ links with ‘magical’ of previous stanza tetrameter/tetrimeter final only scans if ‘cruelly’ is pronounced with 3 syllables dragging the word out and drawing attention to it

22 narrative voice use of 1 st person plural includes reader in the emotional experience of the poem lexical chain ‘sorcery’ links with ‘magical’ of previous stanza tetrameter/tetrimeter final only scans if ‘cruelly’ is pronounced with 3 syllables dragging the word out and drawing attention to it sibilance creates hissing, playing with sound and complementing the harshness of the image It makes us think of all the dead That sauntered with us here, By separation's sorcery Made cruelly more dear.

23 It makes us think of what we had, And what we now deplore. We almost wish those siren throats Would go and sing no more.

24 It makes us think of what we had, And what we now deplore. We almost wish those siren throats Would go and sing no more. narrative voice use of 1 st person plural continues to include reader in the emotional experience of the poem

25 It makes us think of what we had, And what we now deplore. We almost wish those siren throats Would go and sing no more. narrative voice use of 1 st person plural continues to include reader in the emotional experience of the poem alliteration of ‘w’ increases pace by gliding from one word to the next and further emphasises the plural 1 st person voice

26 It makes us think of what we had, And what we now deplore. We almost wish those siren throats Would go and sing no more. narrative voice use of 1 st person plural continues to include reader in the emotional experience of the poem alliteration of ‘w’ increases pace by gliding from one word to the next and further emphasises the plural 1 st person voice pronoun repeated emphasising the depth of sorrow and pain

27 It makes us think of what we had, And what we now deplore. We almost wish those siren throats Would go and sing no more. narrative voice use of 1 st person plural continues to include reader in the emotional experience of the poem modality high modality of ‘deplore’ reveals strength of emotion alliteration of ‘w’ increases pace by gliding from one word to the next and further emphasises the plural 1 st person voice pronoun repeated emphasising the depth of sorrow and pain

28 It makes us think of what we had, And what we now deplore. We almost wish those siren throats Would go and sing no more. narrative voice use of 1 st person plural continues to include reader in the emotional experience of the poem alliteration of ‘w’ increases pace by gliding from one word to the next and further emphasises the plural 1 st person voice allusion Greek sirens who lured sailers to their deaths modality high modality of ‘deplore’ reveals strength of emotion pronoun repeated emphasising the depth of sorrow and pain

29 An ear can break a human heart As quickly as a spear, We wish the ear had not a heart So dangerously near.

30 An ear can break a human heart As quickly as a spear, We wish the ear had not a heart So dangerously near. paradox how can an ear break a heart? links to ‘saddest sound’ ‘sweetest sound’ of opening line = “I love you”

31 An ear can break a human heart As quickly as a spear, We wish the ear had not a heart So dangerously near. kinaesthetic imagery ‘breaking’ sudden and violent yet echoes cliché of broken heart paradox how can an ear break a heart? links to ‘saddest sound’ ‘sweetest sound’ of opening line = “I love you”

32 kinaesthetic imagery ‘breaking’ sudden and violent yet echoes cliché of broken heart paradox how can an ear break a heart? links to ‘saddest sound’ ‘sweetest sound’ of opening line = “I love you” alliteration breathiness of aspirated ‘h’ suggestive of sobbing? An ear can break a human heart As quickly as a spear, We wish the ear had not a heart So dangerously near.

33 kinaesthetic imagery ‘breaking’ sudden and violent yet echoes cliché of broken heart paradox how can an ear break a heart? links to ‘saddest sound’ ‘sweetest sound’ of opening line = “I love you” alliteration breathiness of aspirated ‘h’ suggestive of sobbing? An ear can break a human heart As quickly as a spear, We wish the ear had not a heart So dangerously near. modality full rhyme and repetition of ‘heart’ in final stanza brings sound of poem to closure

34 kinaesthetic imagery ‘breaking’ sudden and violent yet echoes cliché of broken heart paradox how can an ear break a heart? links to ‘saddest sound’ ‘sweetest sound’ of opening line = “I love you” alliteration breathiness of aspirated ‘h’ suggestive of sobbing? enjambment rushes us on to ‘quickly’ and ‘dangerously’ An ear can break a human heart As quickly as a spear, We wish the ear had not a heart So dangerously near.  modality full rhyme and repetition of ‘heart’ in final stanza brings sound of poem to closure

35 kinaesthetic imagery ‘breaking’ sudden and violent yet echoes cliché of broken heart modality full rhyme and repetition of ‘heart’ in final stanza brings sound of poem to closure paradox how can an ear break a heart? links to ‘saddest sound’ ‘sweetest sound’ of opening line = “I love you” alliteration breathiness of aspirated ‘h’ suggestive of sobbing? enjambment rushes us on to ‘quickly’ and ‘dangerously’ An ear can break a human heart As quickly as a spear, We wish the ear had not a heart So dangerously near.  simile speed, violence and aggression of spear


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