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Domestic Violence Training for Managers/Directors This course is designed for PMC’s Management Team. It is intended to assist managers in recognizing signs.

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Presentation on theme: "Domestic Violence Training for Managers/Directors This course is designed for PMC’s Management Team. It is intended to assist managers in recognizing signs."— Presentation transcript:

1 Domestic Violence Training for Managers/Directors This course is designed for PMC’s Management Team. It is intended to assist managers in recognizing signs and symptoms of abuse that may be evident in care partners. It will also provide assistance in knowing where to go for help.

2 Menu Click any link below to jump to the selected topic What is Domestic Violence? Types of Domestic Abuse Warning Signs of Violence and AbuseSigns of Violence and Abuse Finding Help at PMC How Can I Help? Help and Resources Summary References

3 What is Domestic Violence? Florida law (FL statute ) defines domestic violence as:FL statute –Any violence committed by any family member against another family member living in the same home. Stalking is also considered domestic violence. –A family member means husband or wife, ex-husband or ex-wife, a relative or anyone living together as a family. It also means people who have a child together, whether or not they have ever lived together.

4 Myths of Domestic Violence Domestic violence only happens in poor families or minorities. Domestic violence is caused by alcohol or drug abuse. Domestic violence batterers are mentally ill. Domestic violence only happens to women. These are all untrue!!

5 Domestic Violence Facts 1 in 4 women will experience domestic violence in their lifetime. 85% of all victims are women, but men and children can also be victims of domestic violence. 25% of married women experience domestic violence on a regular basis.

6 Domestic Violence Facts Domestic violence occurs in families from all ethnic groups. It occurs in religious and non- religious families. Families from all income levels experience domestic violence.

7 Domestic Violence Affects the Whole Family In 60% of violent homes, children are also beaten. Children who grow up in violent homes are more likely to be abusive partners as adults. More children are served in battered women’s shelters than women.

8 Types of Domestic Abuse Physical abuse Emotional and psychological abuse—verbal abuse (yelling, name- calling, blaming, shaming), isolation, intimidation, and controlling behaviors Sexual abuse—forced sex, even by a spouse or intimate partner with whom you also have consensual sex, is an act of aggression and violence Economic or financial abuse—controlling finances, withholding money, making you account for every penny you spend

9 Cycle of Violence Abuse—aggressive, belittling, or violent behavior Guilt—abusive partner feels guilt, worried they may be caught for what they’ve done. Excuses—abuser does everything they can to regain control and keep the relationship Normal behavior – Your abuser does everything he can to regain control and keep you in the relationship. He may act as if nothing has happened, or he may turn on the charm. This peaceful honeymoon phase may give you hope that your abusive partner has really changed this time. Fantasy—abuser begins to fantasize about hurting again Set-up—abuser sets up a situation where they can justify abusing again Belmonte, Joelle. Domestic Violence and Abuse: Signs of Abuse and Abusive Relationships. Help Guide.org (www.helpguide.org) Web. 25 September 2009.www.helpguide.org

10 Warning Signs of Violence and Abuse People who are being abused may: Seem afraid or anxious to please their partner Check in often with their partner to report where they are and what they’re doing Receive frequent, harassing phone calls from their partner Talk about their partner’s temper, jealousy, or possessiveness Have frequent injuries, with the excuse of “accidents” Frequently miss work, school, or social occasions, without explanation Dress in clothing designed to hide bruises or scars (e.g. wearing long sleeves in the summer or sunglasses indoors) Have very low self-esteem, even if they used to be confident Show major personality changes (e.g. an outgoing woman becomes withdrawn) Be depressed, anxious, or suicidal Belmonte, Joelle. Domestic Violence and Abuse: Signs of Abuse and Abusive Relationships. Help Guide.org (www.helpguide.org) Web. 25 September 2009.www.helpguide.org

11 Is one of your care partners in an Abusive Relationship? Does this care partner: appear afraid of his/her partner much of the time? avoid certain topics out of fear of angering his/her partner? feel that he/she can’t do anything right for his/her partner? believe that he/she deserves to be hurt or mistreated? wonder if he/she is the one who is crazy? appear emotionally numb or helpless? Belmonte, Joelle. Domestic Violence and Abuse: Signs of Abuse and Abusive Relationships. Help Guide.org (www.helpguide.org) Web. 25 September 2009.www.helpguide.org

12 Is one of your care partners in an Abusive Relationship? Does your care partner complain that his/her partner behaves in the following ways: humiliates him/her, yells at him/her, criticizes him/her or puts him/her down? treats him/her so badly that he/she is embarrassed for his/her friends or family to see? ignores or puts down his/her opinions or accomplishments? blames him/her for their abusive behavior? has a bad and unpredictable temper? hurts or threatens to hurt or kill him/her? Belmonte, Joelle. Domestic Violence and Abuse: Signs of Abuse and Abusive Relationships. Help Guide.org (www.helpguide.org) Web. 25 September 2009.www.helpguide.org

13 Is one of your care partners in an Abusive Relationship? Does your care partner complain that his/her partner behaves in the following ways: threatens to take his/her children away or harm them? threatens to commit suicide if he/she leaves? destroys his/her belongings? acts excessively jealous and possessive? constantly checks up on him/her? controls where he/she goes or what he/she does? keeps him/her from seeing his/her friends or family? limits access to money, the phone, or the car?

14 Finding Help at PMC PMC has a Domestic Violence Response Team to assist care partners, yourself or a community member in accessing available resources. All meetings are confidential. Accessing assistance is as easy as placing one phone call. To talk to a member of PMC’s Domestic Violence Response Team, call: –Jerald Smith, Director of Pastoral Care, ext –Melanie Reynolds, Manager of People Development, ext –Roberta Chaildin, Manager of Human Resources, ext. 7742

15 Your Assistance is Needed Ensuring the safety of PMC’s care partner, his/her family and our PMC family is of greatest concern. Domestic violence (DV) resource materials are available in People Development and Communications and Service Excellence. Managers are requested to pick up DV brochures and place them in lounges and break rooms. Also pick up “Help for Victims of Domestic Violence” pocket cards to be placed in all bathrooms (staff and community).

16 Your Assistance is Needed Managers may be asked to remove the care partner from the work schedule for a short period of time to provide time for the care partner to find safety for themselves and their family. Managers may be asked to adjust a care partner’s normal work hours and schedule him/her at a time when his/her safety is more easily observed. Care partners will be asked to maintain frequent contact with his/her immediate supervisor, if time off is granted for this situation.

17 How Can I Help? Don't be afraid to let them know that you are concerned for their safety. Help them recognize the abuse. Tell them you see what is going on and that you want to help. Help them recognize that what is happening is not "normal" and that they deserve a healthy, non-violent relationship. Acknowledge that they are in a very difficult and scary situation. Let them know that the abuse is not their fault. Reassure them that they are not alone and that there is help and support out there.

18 How Can I Help? Be supportive. Listen. Remember that it may be difficult for them to talk about the abuse. Let them know that you are available to help whenever they may need it. What they need most is someone who will believe and listen to them. Be non-judgmental. Respect their decisions. There are many reasons why victims stay in abusive relationships. They may leave and return to the relationship many times. Do not criticize their decisions or try to guilt them. They will need your support even more during those times.

19 How Can I Help? Encourage them to participate in activities outside of the relationship with friends and family. If they end the relationship, continue to be supportive of them. Even though the relationship was abusive, they may still feel sad and lonely once it is over. They will need time to mourn the loss of the relationship and will especially need your support at that time. Help them develop a safety plan.

20 How Can I Help? Encourage them to talk to people who can provide help and guidance. Contact the DV Response Team here at PMC. Encourage them to contact a local domestic violence agency that provides counseling or support groups. Remember that you cannot "rescue" them. Although it is difficult to see someone you care about get hurt, ultimately the person getting hurt has to be the one to decide that they want to do something about it. It's important for you to support them and help them find a way to safety and peace.

21 How Can I Help? Keep your conversations confidential. Although it is tempting to elicit the help of other care partners, confidentiality is important. Many times the individual is embarrassed and does not want others to know. Avoid telling them to leave. They need to have a safety plan in place first. Leaving is the most dangerous time for a victim. Encourage them to seek assistance. They can start by contacting the DV Response Team at PMC.

22 Domestic Violence is a Cycle Remember that many victims who are abused will return to their abuser. DO NOT JUDGE THEM! Continue to provide support and be available to them, even if they go back. They need you even more.

23 Finding Help in the Community There are 3 shelters in Brevard County: The Salvation Army: Serene Harbor: Women’s Center: You can also reach them by calling 211 You can also have them call the Florida Domestic Violence Hotline at

24 Finding Help in the Community Brevard County may provide other services to domestic violence victims such as relocation assistance, legal aid, and protective orders.

25 National Resources for Domestic Violence National Domestic Violence Hotline – SAFE (7233) –www.ndvh.orgwww.ndvh.org

26 Speak Up If you suspect that someone you know is being abused, speak up! Expressing your concern will let the person know that you care and may even save their life. Talk to the person in private. Point out the things you’ve noticed that cause concern. Reassure them that you’re there to talk if/when they want to. Reassure them that you’ll keep these conversations private. Let them know that PMC has a Domestic Violence Response Team who is willing to confidentially meet with them. Remember, abusers are very good at controlling and manipulating their victims. Abused and battered women/men are depressed, drained, scared, ashamed, and confused. They need help to get out, yet they have often been isolated from their family and friends. By picking up on the warning signs and offering support, you can help them escape an abusive situation and begin healing. Belmonte, Joelle. Domestic Violence and Abuse: Signs of Abuse and Abusive Relationships. Help Guide.org (www.helpguide.org) Web. 25 September 2009.www.helpguide.org

27 Local Resources for Abusers Call 211 for local resources PMC care partners and their family members can call the Employee Assistance Program, Horizon at for confidential individual and family counseling for a variety of issues including anger management, stress and anxiety issues with family, stress from marital problems, separation or divorce, depression and difficult times in relationships. Call the Department of Children and Families “Certified Batterer Intervention Program” at

28 Survey Please click this link to complete a brief 3 question survey about the content of this Domestic Violence course (survey will open in a new window) Survey

29 Summary Domestic violence can happen to women, men, or children. PMC is committed to assisting care partners who have been abused. Care partners can find help by talking to you. Please make sure they know that they can come to you. Brevard County offers a range of support services as well

30 References Glenda Martin, Victim Advocate, Brevard County Sheriff’s Office Kanel, Kristi. A Guide to Crisis Intervention. Brooks/Cole _causes_effects.htmhttp://www.helpguide.org/mental/domestic_violence_abuse_types_signs _causes_effects.htm

31 Exit We hope this CBL course has been informative and helpful Click Take Test on the left side of the screen when you are ready to complete the requirements for this course Click Reports and then select Transcript to view your transcript Select Exit to close the Student Interface


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