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The International Space Station TO This 1998-2003 All Pictures and text from NASA sources, unless otherwise noted.

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Presentation on theme: "The International Space Station TO This 1998-2003 All Pictures and text from NASA sources, unless otherwise noted."— Presentation transcript:

1 The International Space Station TO This All Pictures and text from NASA sources, unless otherwise noted

2 Zarya plus Unity = the beginning of the International Space Station, December, 1998 ( November 1998)

3 Endeavour Delivers Unity Node to International Space Station STS-88, December 4-12, The 13th flight of the Space Shuttle Endeavour, began the largest international cooperative space venture in history as it attached together in orbit the first two modules of the International Space Station. STS-88 was the first human International Space Station assembly flight.

4 Shuttle Crew Supplies and Outfits New Space Station (May 27-June 3, 1999) Space Shuttle Discovery and the STS-96 crew visited the new International Space Station for six days of docked activities. This flight represented the first shuttle docking to the fledgling space outpost. The first major task for the shuttle astronauts was preparing for, then performing, a spacewalk to outfit the Zarya and Unity Modules and the mating adapter to which they are attached. Afterwards, the crew focused on transferring nearly 1,360 kilograms (3,000 pounds) of equipment from the shuttle to the ISS for use by future station crews.

5 STS-101 Outfits International Space Station Space Shuttle Atlantis spent nearly 10 days in space in May 2000, six of which (May 19-26) were spent docked with the International Space Station. While docked with the space station, the crew refurbished and replaced components in both the Zarya and Unity Modules.

6 Zvezda, the fifth flight, docked with the station on July 25, 2000 at 8:45 p.m. EDT (July 26 at 00:45 GMT), and became the third major component of the station.

7 STS-106 Readies Station for Occupancy Space Shuttle Atlantis spent nearly 12 days in orbit during September 2000, seven of which were spent docked with the International Space Station. While in orbit, the STS-106 crew successfully prepared the International Space Station for the arrival of the first permanent crew. The STS-106 crewmembers -- acting as plumbers, movers, installers and electricians -- installed batteries, power converters, a toilet and a treadmill on the outpost. They also delivered more than 2,993 kilograms (6,600 pounds) of supplies.

8 100th Space Shuttle Flight STS-92 took its place in history Oct. 11, 2000, when Space Shuttle Discovery launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Fla., to begin the 100th flight of the space shuttle program. During STS-92, the crew delivered and installed the Z1 Truss and Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 to the International Space Station. Z1 Truss

9 STS-97 Delivers Giant Solar Arrays to International Space Station (Nov. 30-Dec. 11, 2000) During its 11-day mission, the crew of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-97 saw the International Space Station spread its wings -- giant solar arrays that quintupled the station's electrical power

10 STS-98 Delivers Destiny Lab to International Space Station (Feb. 7-20, 2001) Space Shuttle Atlantis spent almost 13 days in orbit, with seven of those days docked to the International Space Station.

11 STS-102 Swaps International Space Station Crews (March 8-21, 2001) Space Shuttle Discovery spent almost 13 days in orbit, with nearly nine of those days docked to the International Space Station. While at the orbital outpost, the STS-102 crew attached the Leonardo Multi- Purpose Logistics Module, transferred supplies and equipment to the station, and completed two space walks.

12 STS-100 Delivers Canadarm2 to International Space Station (April 21- May 1, 2001) Endeavour and its crew spent almost 12 days on orbit, eight of which were spent in joint operations with the International Space Station crew. Endeavour’s crew delivered and installed a new robotic arm and helped to transfer equipment and supplies between vehicles.

13 STS-104 Delivers Quest to International Space Station (July 12-24, 2001) Space Shuttle Atlantis spent 13 days in orbit, eight of those days docked with the International Space Station. While at the orbital outpost, the STS-104 crew delivered the Quest Airlock and installed it on the station's Unity Node.

14 Quest airlock in place on Unity Node

15 STS-105 Swaps International Space Station Crews Space Shuttle Discovery spent 12 days in orbit (Aug , 2001), with eight of those days docked to the International Space Station. Discovery delivered the Expedition Three crew -- Commander Frank Culbertson, Pilot Vladimir Dezhurov and Flight Engineer Mikhail Tyurin -- for its extended stay aboard the space station. It returned to Earth with Expedition Two crewmembers Commander Yury Usachev and Flight Engineers Jim Voss and Susan Helms who had spent about five months living on the station.

16 ISS expansion continued with the arrival of the Russian Docking Component on Sept. 16, The docking Compartment is called Pirs, which is the Russian word for pier.

17 STS-108 Swaps International Space Station Crews December 5-17, 2001 STS-108 was the 12th shuttle flight to visit the International Space Station and the first since the installation of the Russian airlock called Pirs on the station. Endeavour delivered the Expedition Four crew -- Commander Yury Onufrienko and Flight Engineers Carl Walz and Dan Bursch -- to the orbital outpost. The Expedition Three crew -- Commander Frank Culbertson, Pilot Vladimir Dezhurov and Flight Engineer Mikhail Tyurin -- returned to Earth on Endeavour.

18 STS110-E-5174 (11 April 2002) -- - Backdropped by the blackness of space and Earth’s horizon, the S0 (S-Zero) Truss is moved from the Space Shuttle Atlantis’ cargo bay. Astronauts Ellen Ochoa, STS-110 mission specialist, and Daniel W. Bursch, Expedition Four flight engineer, used the International Space Station’s (ISS) Canadarm2 to lift the S0 Truss out of the orbiter’s payload bay and install it onto the temporary claw fixture on the Destiny laboratory. STS-110 Delivers Framework for Station Expansion April 8-17, 2002 Space Shuttle Atlantis lifted off at 3:44 p.m. CDT (2044 GMT) April 8, 2002 on a mission to install the 43-foot-long S0 (S-Zero) Truss -- the backbone for future station expansion -- to the International Space Station.

19 Endeavour Delivers Expedition Five Crew The International Space Station received a new crew and a new platform for its robotic arm when STS-111 visited in June STS-111, which was the 14th shuttle mission to visit the orbital outpost, launched June 5 and landed June 19.

20 Outward expansion of the station occurred during STS-112, which is also known as ISS Assembly Flight 9A, with the delivery the S1 Truss. The S1 was attached to the starboard side of the S0 Truss. Launch Date: Oct. 7, 2002

21 STS-113 Delivers New Crew, Truss Segment to Station During a 14-day mission in November and December 2002, Space Shuttle Endeavour and its crew extended the International Space Station's backbone and exchanged the Expedition Five and Six crews.

22 Expedition 7 The seventh crew of the International Space Station lifted off in a Soyuz from the Russian Space Agency's Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on April 25, 2003, at 10:54 p.m. CDT. The Soyuz docked on April 28, 2003 and took over command of the ISS. The Soyuz returned the Expedition Six crew to Earth on 5/3/03 after having been in space for over five months. The Expedition Six crewmembers' stay in space was extended by almost two months in response to the Space Shuttle Columbia accident on Feb. 1. “The same Creator who names the stars also knows the names of the seven souls we mourn today. The crew of the shuttle Columbia did not return safely to Earth; yet we can pray that all are safely home.” George W. Bush

23 NASA Drawing


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