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Literary Genres An Overview. Based on our target population of our students, we chose the overview as the pre-instructional strategy most likely to be.

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Presentation on theme: "Literary Genres An Overview. Based on our target population of our students, we chose the overview as the pre-instructional strategy most likely to be."— Presentation transcript:

1 Literary Genres An Overview

2 Based on our target population of our students, we chose the overview as the pre-instructional strategy most likely to be successful. This overview presentation was designed to be: 1. Fully Interactive. 2. Used online – able to be accessed in small groups/individually – even at home for review. 3. Clear in rationale to students of why they need to know information. 4. Printed out also as packet so students have reference hard-copies (varied methods of delivery are employed in consideration of the 45% student population who require resource support, differentiation, repetition, and accommodation). In addition, online activities were included, using the web support and assessment software, Quia.com Please Note:

3 Welcome To This Unit! Literary Genres A. Click on any box to get started – B. Make sure to explore all pages C. Click on “Home” to return to this page Why Do I Need to Study This Unit? What Are the Literary Genre Categories? Parts of a Plot Plan Study Terms For Test Page Online Review Games & Tutorials

4 1. Overview of Unit (What you are doing now) 2. Introduction and Review of Literary Genres Presentation (Terms, parts of plot lines, & characteristics of 6 genre classifications) 3. Break-out session – small group hand-out/discussion/games 4. Small group tour of library and genre scavenger hunt 5. Small group writing of short story, then post on wiki 6. Based on feedback, group will make revisions, and re-post 7. Individual report of a book selected from one of the 6 literary genre categories 8. Review games and tutorials – (in small groups in class and on your own at home) 9. Unit Test 10. Self-Reflection, Give Feedback/Take survey on Unit/Wrap-up Welcome to Our Literary Genres Unit – What We’ll Be Doing HOME (Click here to return to main page) (Depending on time, we may carry some of the activities over into the next unit)

5 Often called “Who dun its?” Usually includes witnesses, suspects, and detective Red Herrings - Misleading clues used to keep readers guessing in a Mystery Sir Arthur Conan Doyle – Considered the Father of Mystery Genre, and author of the Famous Sherlock Holmes Series 6 Main Categories of Literary Genres HOME MYSTERY FANTASY ROMANCE HORROR ADVENTURE SCIENCE FICTION HISTORICAL FICTION Fantasy - Supposes that magic and mythical or supernatural creatures do exist Romance - Stories about people seeking companionship and love, often plot line ends in marriage, often dramatic and colorful covers showing a man and woman embracing. Historical Fiction - Based on real characters and events, with added fictitious details, characters, and/or events. Not like a History Book, but characters do behave and react in realistic ways. Books which are meant to fill the reader with fearful anticipation or dread. Stephen King - One of the most popular writers of all time of the Horror Genre Adventure - Type of realistic fiction – stories packed with action and drama – usually involving physical danger and a hero. Science Fiction - Genre which explores the question “What If? Common themes are aliens, the future, space and time travel. Star Trek Series good example. Fantasy genre closely related in characteristics to Science Fiction. Jules Verne - The father of Science Fiction, he wrote many stories in which inventions described are now possible – he was a scientific and technological visionary.

6 Literary Genres Why Do I Need to Study This Unit? HOME (Click here to return to main page) Here are some ways you will be able to use what you learn:  When selecting and identifying books in a library  For writing book reports and reviews  To improve your overall writing and research skills – useful in college or at a job  Will help you better answer certain questions in required standards tests – so you will not have to later make up work/re-take the tests  You’ll strengthen teamwork skills – helpful in sports, activities, and later on the job  You can more easily and confidently talk about books and even movie plot lines

7 Parts of a Plot Plan #1 - Exposition (Beginning) #3 - Rising Action CC #2 - Conflict #5 - Falling Action #4 - Climax (Height of Action) #6 - Resolution (End of Story) Click here to return to main page)

8 Games for Review Use these to help you study... HOME (Click here to return to main page) Play these games in small groups in class and also on your own at home – before your unit test:  The 6 parts of a Plot Plan in order  Columns Game - Match literary genre terms with descriptions  Games to Review for Test - Part 1  Part 2 - Literary Genres Unit Review Games

9 Definition of literary genre - French for “kind of book/writing” Mysteries - Often called “Who dun its?” Usually includes witnesses, suspects, and detective Fantasy - Supposes that magic and mythical or supernatural creatures do exist Historical Fiction - Based on real characters and events, with fictitious details or characters and events added. Not like a History Book, but characters behave in realistic ways Science Fiction - Genre which explores the question “What If? Common themes aliens, the future, space and time travel Star Trek Series good example of this genre. Romance - Stories about people seeking companionship and love, often plot line ends in marriage, usually dramatic and colorful covers showing a man and woman Adventure - Type of realistic fiction – stories packed with action and drama – usually involving physical danger and a hero Horror - Books which are meant to fill the reader with fearful anticipation or dread Stephen King - One of the most popular writers of all time of the Horror Genre Dialogue - Words spoken by characters in a story Novel - Fictional Narrative in Prose Hook - Something in the story which grabs and keeps the reader’s attention – considered a literary device Plot Plan - A way to arrange the sequence of events in a story. There are five parts to a plot line Exposition - the beginning or telling of a story in a plot plan Rising Action - In a plot plan, after conflict and building to the climax of the story Conflict - A point in the plot plan of divergent forces or choices Climax - part of plot plan that is at the height of action Falling Action - After the climax events in a plot line leading to the end or resolution Resolution - The ending of a plot plan where the story concludes Science Fiction and Fantasy - Two Genres closely related in characteristics Red Herrings - Misleading clues used to keep readers guessing in a Mystery The word “Genre” - Can be associated with both fiction/non-fiction Jules Verne - The father of Science Fiction, Wrote many stories in which inventions described are now scientifically possible – he today is considered a scientific and technological visionary. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle – Considered the Father of Mystery Genre, Author of the Famous Sherlock Holmes Series Setting - Location and time where and when story takes place Script – A version of a book adapted for a movie or play Study These Terms and Definitions: HOME (Click here to return to main page)


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