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Coaching Your Team to Success Ted Middelberg, Ed.D., MBA President, Systemic Leadership LLC.

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Presentation on theme: "Coaching Your Team to Success Ted Middelberg, Ed.D., MBA President, Systemic Leadership LLC."— Presentation transcript:

1 Coaching Your Team to Success Ted Middelberg, Ed.D., MBA President, Systemic Leadership LLC

2 Outcomes for our conversation Why coach team leaders Following a coaching process Two diagnostic frameworks Four team tools Six usable templates Practical application discussions Are you in the right conference session? GOAL: Increase in both your ability and motivation to use a coaching stance to build high performing teams.

3 Why coach team leaders? What the data showed Are you creating a team culture loaded for success? Ted Middelberg Dissertation

4 Why coach team leaders? Results are not generated equally What is your coaching ROI potential? Fortune 100 Company 2009 Research Bottom 30%Top 10% Turnover19%<10% Thinking about quitting45%<15% Customer satisfaction39%>70% Bottom-line resultsNegative5X better Commitment30%>85% Goes the extra mile15%>60%

5 Why coach team leaders? Benefits of a neutral, outside perspective Manager Holds a boss’s view of leadership Has deep insider knowledge Often has decision preferences or ideas Is embedded in the system Coach Is service-oriented Does not presume to know the real issues Does not know the answers; enter with curiosity Sees the system from “above” How will you enter the system?

6 Why coach team leaders? Outcomes defined using three criteria 1.Deliverable acceptable to client 2.Growth in team capability 3.Individual member learning What are your short-term and long-term criteria? J. Richard Hackman

7 Why coach team leaders? Because team leaders really matter! Leaders create the environment Business impact and ROI potential Coaches enter with unique advantages Coaches bring a long-term perspective

8 Following a coaching process: A classic coaching model OUTCOMES Agree on the results you want to achieve 1 INFORMATION Collect and analyze information 2 ACTIONS Create and implement an action plan 3 RESULTS Measure progress and clarify next steps 4 Lee Hecht Harrison

9 Leadership is always about change! Moving to a team-owned goal Staking a goalTaking stockPathways to success Is the goal theirs or yours? OUTCOMES

10 2. Create a guiding coalition 8. Institutionalize the new approach 7. Consolidate gains/produce more change 6. Generate short-term wins 5. Empower broad-based action 4. Communicate the change vision 3. Develop a vision and strategy 1. Establish a sense of urgency John Kotter What is your team’s business case for change? Leadership is always about change! From agreement to engagement OUTCOMES

11 Leadership coaching: Scope of work Team Name: Organization: Assignment Length: Contact Info: Start Date: Anticipated End Date: Manager / Sponsor / Title: Contact Info: Team’s Most Pressing Work Challenges: Overarching Coaching Focus: Key Team Performance Strengths/Behaviors (Leverage these as explore Action Steps) Key Team Areas / Behaviors for Development (Each of these becomes a goal on the following pages) Goal 1: Goal 2: Goal 3: How do you keep your team focused on outcomes? OUTCOMES

12 Following a coaching process: A classic coaching model OUTCOMES Agree on the results you want to achieve 1 INFORMATION Collect and analyze information 2 ACTIONS Create and implement an action plan 3 RESULTS Measure progress and clarify next steps 4 Lee Hecht Harrison

13 Gathering information: Predictable and systematic Personal Relationships Task Functions Storming Norming Performing Forming Bruce TuckmanPatrick Lencioni INFO

14 Predictable team challenges: Trust – Lencioni’s foundation Results: An unrelenting focus on specific objectives and clearly defined outcomes Accountability: The willingness of team members to call their peers on performance or behaviors that might hurt the team Commitment: Make clear and timely decisions and move forward with complete buy-in from every member of the team, even those who voted against the decision Conflict: Teams discuss and resolve issues more quickly and completely than others and emerge from heated debates with no residual feelings or collateral damage Trust: Confidence among teammates that their peers’ intentions are good, and that there is no reason to be protective or careful around the group INFO

15 How to build or rebuild trust: Know what its absence looks like Conceal their weaknesses and mistakes from one another Hesitate to ask for help or provide constructive criticism Hesitate to offer help outside their own areas of responsibilities Jump to conclusions about the intentions and aptitudes of others without attempting to clarify them Fail to recognize and tap into one anothers’ skills and experiences Waste time and energy managing their behaviors for effect Hold grudges Dread meetings and find reasons to avoid spending time together Does this create urgency for change in your team? INFO

16 How to build or rebuild trust: Invite leaders to change their behaviors Acting with integrity: Behaving in a consistent manner Demonstrating concern: Respecting the well-being of others Achieving results: Following through on business commitments Robert Bruce Shaw What new behaviors would help your leaders build trust? INFO

17 How to build or rebuild trust: Subordinate individual interests Francis Fukuyama “The ability of people to work together for common purposes … depends on the degree to which communities share norms and values and are able to subordinate individual interests to those of the large group.” “The group, moreover, has to adopt common norms as a whole before trust can become generalized among its members.” How does you team reinforce subordinating individual efforts? INFO

18 How to build or rebuild trust: Create and reinforce team norms How teams create norms: Imported by members Evolve gradually Created from group structure Reinforcing norms: Regular interactions Focus on member behavior Define group limits J. Richard Hackman What are the norms that your team has co-created? INFO

19 How to build or rebuild trust: Use facilitation to jump start change Build the business case for trust Clarify what behaviors are desired Establish team meeting ground rules supporting trust Identify the restraining forces or barriers to trust Make those barriers discussable Hold members accountable for their behaviors What did your mother teach you about rebuilding trust? Facilitation Literature, e.g., Roger Schwarz INFO

20 A diagnostic framework summary: Predictable team dysfunctions – Trust example 1.Know what the absence of trust looks like 2.Invite leaders to change their behaviors 3.Subordinate individual interests 4.Create and reinforce team norms 5.Use facilitation to jump-start change INFO

21 Two diagnostic frameworks: Predictable and systematic 21 Personal Relationships Task Functions Storming Norming Performing Forming TuckmanLencioni INFO

22 Stages of team development: Normalizing expectations and identifying barriers Personal relationships Task functions Storming Norming Performing Forming Interdependence Cohesion Conflict Dependent DataOrientingOrganizingProblem Solving INFO

23 Personal relationships Task functions Forming Dependent Orienting Stages of team development: Forming What gets accomplished: Establish rapport Develop basis for trust Learn expectations What we see: Superficial conversations Polite Little or no conflict INFO

24 Stages of team development: Storming What we see: Confrontations Frustration Confusion What gets accomplished: Resolutions of vying for position/influence Focus out of multiplicity of priorities Foundation for safety Clarifying culture Personal relationships Task functions Storming Conflict Organizing INFO

25 Stages of team development: Norming What we see: Goal-oriented behaviors Lots of ideas Active feedback What gets accomplished: Healthy conflict Goal/priority alignment Building momentum Effective communication Personal relationships Task functions Norming Cohesion Data INFO

26 Stages of team development: A fresh way of conceptualizing What we see: Task-oriented behaviors Free exchange of ideas Not taking it just personally Supportive What gets accomplished: The goal/task Developing as a group Individuals learning Personal relationships Task functions Performing Interdependence Problem solving INFO

27 A diagnostic framework: Predictable stages of team development 1.What we can expect to see 2.What gets accomplished 3.Where to look when something goes amiss 4.Normalizing the conversations Personal relationships Task functions Storming Norming Performing Forming INFO

28 Following a coaching process: A classic coaching model OUTCOMES Agree on the results you want to achieve 1 INFORMATION Collect and analyze information 2 ACTIONS Create and implement an action plan 3 RESULTS Measure progress and clarify next steps 4 Lee Hecht Harrison

29 Four team tools for taking action At the heart of many team challenges is the need to resolve priority differences among scarce resources. Tools for mastery include: 1.Functional sub-grouping 2.Decision fallback matrix 3.Strategic planning hybrid model 4.Force field analysis ACTIONS

30 Team tools: Functional sub-grouping The concept of joining on similarities Build cohesive positions Suspend judgment while listening to both sides Explore the similarities within the differences Yvonne Agazarian ACTIONS

31 Team tools: Functional sub-grouping application Take a topic with known differences of opinion. Describe the concept of exploring fully one side and then the other side. Invite someone to start and then to continue by asking, “Anyone else?” Do not allow differences to enter until the first group is well developed. Yvonne Agazarian ACTIONS

32 Team tools: Decision fallback matrix Commitment Time Advising Voting Consensus Telling Honor the time and priority challenges facing the team. Make trade-offs discussable up front. Developed at IBM ACTIONS

33 Team tools: Decision fallback matrix application Acknowledge your time realities and be prepared to “fall back” to the faster option. “We have until noon to reach a decision on this. While a consensus would be preferred, I may have to make this decision without that.” Developed at IBM Commitment Time Advising Voting Consensus Telling ACTIONS

34 Team tools: Strategic DDP hybrid The challenge facing the strategy executives at IBM: Introduce a wider range of alternatives, suspend judgment on any one answer, seek the hybrid or best of all world solution Build on potency of functional sub-grouping; drop being married to one solution idea. Clarify your perspectives (short-term and long-term) or either “my” silo … “my” plan Decision Dialogue Process ACTIONS

35 Team tools: Strategic DDP hybrid application Find the best elements within each viable alternative. Seek to meld these and thus create an outcome better than any of the original alternatives. Create multiple viable alternatives, resisting the pull to stop after the first one is on the table. The best elements of viable options Decision Dialogue Process ACTIONS

36 Team tools: Force field analysis There are plenty of forces that push us towards our goals, including our own drive and influence. The challenge is that in a system there are an equal and offsetting number of forces that restrain us from our goals. The efficient, long term path is to remove the restraining forces. GOAL: RESTRAINING FORCES DRIVING FORCES Kurt Lewin ACTIONS

37 Team tools: Force field analysis application Ask for the behaviors that help move the group towards the goal. Restate until these are behavioral. Ask for the behaviors that deter or retard the group from achieving the goal. Test: Are the driving forces sufficiently motivating? If not, seek additional driving forces. Test: What will this team do to eradicate these restraining forces? GOAL: RESTRAINING FORCES DRIVING FORCES ACTIONS

38 Summary: Four team tools for taking action Commitment Time GOAL: Which of these tools will you introduce to your leaders? Functional sub-grouping Strategic DDP hybrid Decision fallback matrix Force field analysis ACTIONS

39 Following a coaching process: A classic coaching model OUTCOMES Agree on the results you want to achieve 1 INFORMATION Collect and analyze information 2 ACTIONS Create and implement an action plan 3 RESULTS Measure progress and clarify next steps 4 Lee Hecht Harrison

40 Leadership coaching: Scope of work Team Name: Organization: Assignment Length: Contact Info: Start Date: Anticipated End Date: Manager / Sponsor / Title: Contact Info: Team’s Most Pressing Work Challenges: Overarching Coaching Focus: Key Team Performance Strengths/Behaviors (Leverage these as explore Action Steps) Key Team Areas / Behaviors for Development (Each of these becomes a goal on the following pages) Goal 1: Goal 2: Goal 3: How do you keep your team focused on outcomes? OUTCOMES

41 Leadership coaching: Motivation and desired differences GOAL #1 (From the key areas / Behaviors for development): Value of achieving this goalWhat would be different in six months Are these sufficiently motivating?Would others be able to see these? INFO

42 Leadership coaching: Driving and restraining forces GOAL #1 (From the key areas / Behaviors for development): Driving forcesRestraining forces Are these sufficient?What actions to overcome? INFO

43 Coaching skills that enable success: Have you achieved your goals? GOAL #1 (From the key areas / Behaviors for development): Action stepsProgress report What are behaviors are you changing?Where are you applying these changes? ACTIONS

44 Coaching skills that enable success Measurement by asking! 1. … provide relevant inputs and connect to your issues? 2. … follow a clear methodology or model? 3. … enable you to discuss important issues? 4. … hold you accountable for your commitments? 5. … stretch your comfort zone by asking challenging questions? 6. … establish an environment marked by trust and open communication? Survey question template using a five-point Likert scale plus space for comments. Did your coach: RESULTS

45 Coaching evidence-based outcomes: Survey question template 1.Coaching is intended to provide objective, third-party input to frame/reframe issues. What new ways of seeing the issues would you point to as evidence of this? 2.Coaching is intended to help the coachee change behaviors. What behavioral changes would others (boss, peers or direct reports) point to as evidence of this? 3.Coaching is intended to foster improved performance. What data would you point to that demonstrates improved performance? 4.Coaching is intended to help the executive articulate and then achieve specific goals. What evidence would you provide that demonstrates achievement of key coaching goals? 5.Coaching is intended to provide value to the organization. What is the “return” portion of ROI that you would attribute to this coaching? 6. Coaching is intended to embed support for on-going change. What steps have been taken to ensure your ongoing success? RESULTS

46 Outcomes for our conversation Why coach team leaders Following a coaching process Two diagnostic frameworks Four team tools Six usable templates Practical application discussions GOAL: Increase in both your ability and motivation to use a coaching stance to build high performing teams.

47 Plus- Delta on this session RESTRAINING FORCES DRIVING FORCES GOAL: Increase in both your ability and motivation to use a coaching stance to build high performing teams. RESULTS

48 T ed Middelberg, Ed.D., MBA President, Systemic Leadership LLC In 1992, Ted followed his passion for developing leaders and moved from a career as a financial executive to being a doctorate student in leadership at UT. Ted is the founder of Systemic Leadership LLC, a consulting firm specializing in helping executives and teams to increase their leadership effectiveness, guiding organizations to implement and run mentoring programs, and coaching leaders to enhance their executive presence. He also serves as an executive coach and consultant for Lee Hecht Harrison, addressing leadership development needs within large, multi-national corporations. Prior to starting his own business, Ted was an organizational development consultant at IBM and coordinated leadership development for AMD. Middelberg earned his undergraduate degree from Brown University, his MBA at The Ohio State University, and his Ed.D. at The University of Texas - Austin. His dissertation explored the behaviors leaders use to maximize team performance. He teaches leadership topics as an adjunct faculty member for the Masters of Science in Organizational Leadership and Ethics program at St. Edward’s University. Ted is currently serving as the VP of Career Development for the Austin Human Resource Management Association (AHRMA). Earlier, he served on the board of the Council on At-Risk Youth, of Austin’s ASTD chapter and as President of the Austin Chapter of the Financial Executive Institute. Ted is a member of many professional organizations.

49 Appendix A: 15 +1 Conflict management skills Traditional leadership tools (5) Group-dynamics-based techniques (5) Attitude-based commitments (5) Leader as fallback resource (1)

50 Appendix A on conflict management skills: Five traditional leadership tools 1.Conflict management style –Withdraw, artificial harmony, aggressively disagree, collaborate 2.Active listening –Open-ended questions, paraphrase, demonstrate full presence 3.Goal alignment –Rich overlap of WIIFM, team and organizational objectives 4.Collaborative problem solving –Neutral setting, purpose clarification, active listening, respectful exchanges, join alternative exploration, seek best solution for both 5.Root cause or underlying issue analysis –Explore more than the presenting or surface-level issue, use quality literature techniques.

51 Appendix A on conflict management skills: Five group-dynamics-based techniques 1.NTIJP: Not taking it just personally 2.Use sub-groups to explore similarities and differences 3.Keep an observer-self present and active 4.Converse to minimize defensiveness 5.Participate at multiple levels in the system

52 Appendix A on conflict management skills: Five attitude-based commitments 1.Demonstrate the courage to be authentic and vulnerable 2.Sit with your discomfort 3.Take the risk of making your thinking transparent 4.Establish and live shared values and norms 5.Hold each other accountable

53 Appendix A on conflict management skills: Leader as the fallback resource Context: the conflict becomes too personal and so the parties involved are brought together by the leader. Questions: –What is the problem as you perceive it? –What does the other person do that contributes the problem? –What do you want or need from the other person? –What do you do that contributes to the problem? –What first step can you take to resolve the problem? Process –Diagnosis – clarify differences and recognize areas of common understanding –Initiation – bring the disagreement to the surface –Listening – hear both the factual and the emotional aspects of what is being said –Problem solving – traditional approaches work.

54 Questions? This presentation is available for download at www.tgslc.org/tgconference.


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