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THE LEARNING OBJECTIVES a. In-person communications b. Reports and Emails c. Dealing with a difficult or challenging situation WHAT YOU’LL LEARN IN THIS.

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Presentation on theme: "THE LEARNING OBJECTIVES a. In-person communications b. Reports and Emails c. Dealing with a difficult or challenging situation WHAT YOU’LL LEARN IN THIS."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 THE LEARNING OBJECTIVES

3 a. In-person communications b. Reports and s c. Dealing with a difficult or challenging situation WHAT YOU’LL LEARN IN THIS COURSE

4 Have you ever experienced the dread of meeting a new employer? Do you worry about a meeting with your supervisor? Or, do you simply trust that your communications will be a positive one? There are many reasons why we engage in communications with an employer: IN A JOB INTERVIEW IN A JOB EVALUATION IN A MEETING IN-PERSON COMMUNICATIONS

5 Employers are looking for people who can do this: Communicate effectively both orally and in writing Make compelling presentations Communicate succinctly via Be professional on the phone Write a complex business plan Motivate a team to action THESE ARE THE SKILLS OF THE 21 ST CENTURY WORKPLACE WHAT EMPLOYERS ARE LOOKING FOR

6 Employers want people who can interact well with others Employers want people who can communicate well and appropriately Employers want people who can resolve conflicts Employers want people who can honor diversity in the workplace Employers want people who can communicate well with international investors INTERACTING WITH OTHERS

7 The fact is; to communicate well with an employer is the same as communicating well with your colleagues. IT’S ALL ABOUT COMMUNICATING WELL IN THE WORKPLACE. BE CONSIDERATE. Don’t dominate the conversation by talking only about yourself. STAY FOCUSED ON THE CONVERSATION. Doing something else while you are talking sends a message to the listener that you don’t think the conversation is worthy of your full attention. MAKE TIME TO LISTEN. No one likes to be rushed. Let your colleague or employer know you really are listening. STICK TO THE ISSUE AT HAND. If your employer or colleague needs to say something, then don’t try and divert the conversation to another topic. COMMUNICATE WELL IN THE WORKPLACE

8 TRY THE 5 SECOND RULE. Give yourself 5 seconds before your respond to someone. This gives you time to really consider your answer. REMEMBER WHO YOU’RE TALKING TO. Your employer deserves your respect. You may disagree on certain points, but you don’t argue with an employer. MANAGE YOUR EMOTIONS. Certain issues are hot topics for everyone. They push our “emotional buttons”. But, a conversation with an employer is no time to exhibit your anger or frustration. Keep these in check. COMMUNICATE WELL IN THE WORKPLACE - 2

9 Before you speak to your boss, write down all the topics you want to discuss and what you hope to communicate. Make sure you’re clear about what you want/need from your boss. Make “I” statements, such as “I need guidance” Be an active listener. Learn to really listen and understand what your boss says. If you missed or weren’t clear about a point, ask your boss to repeat or clarify it. Keep an open mind and be open to compromise. WHEN IT’S TIME TO TALK TO THE BOSS

10 Try to repeat and rephrase the points your boss makes during a conversation to show that you’re listening and understanding him or her. Avoid gossiping or spreading rumors to your boss. Be sure to give your boss praise and recognition when it’s due. If at all possible, talk to your boss before issues become heated and you become emotionally involved. Communicate regularly with your boss to develop and maintain a comfortable relationship. MORE ON SPEAKING TO YOUR BOSS

11 One of the ways to improve communications is to improve your relationship in general. Here are some practical tips: Put yourself in their place: Try to understand situations from their perspective Take the time to get to know them: Can you schedule an informal lunch or coffee break? Know when and how to communicate with them: If your boss prefers in- person chats, don’t replace them with s ALWAYS ask for feedback: This shows you wan to work hard and progress Offer to help with something valuable: Get on board with a charity drive, or take the initiative to start one. TIPS TO IMPROVE YOUR RELATIONSHIP TO YOUR BOSS

12 These may seem obvious but these are the characteristics any boss is seeking in their employees: AUTHENTICITY MUTUAL RESPECT HONESTY UNDER PROMISING & OVER DELIVERING LACK OF INVOLVEMENT IN OFFICE POLITICS OPEN LINES OF COMMUNICATION QUALITIES YOUR BOSS IS LOOKING FOR

13 This is too large a topic to be dealt with in full in this lesson, but here are some valuable tips. NEVER ARGUE WHEN YOU RECEIVE FEEDBACK FROM YOUR BOSS TAKE EVERYTHING YOUR BOSS SAYS INTO CONSIDERATION LET YOUR BOSS KNOW YOU APPRECIATE THE FEEDBACK COMMUNICATE WITH YOUR BOSS ABOUT A STRATEGY TO WORK ON ISSUES BROUGHT UP IN FEEDBACK OR AN EVALUATION TAKE THE TIME TO THANK YOUR BOSS IN PERSON AND IN WRITING LET YOUR BOSS KNOW YOU RESPECT THEIR OPINION COMMUNICATING ABOUT FEEDBACK AND EVALUATIONS

14 REPORTS & S

15 WRITING EFFECTIVE REPORTS One of the key skills in the workplace today is the ability to write effective, strong, and well- written reports. These are required in many different instances: SALES REPORTS MARKETING REPORTS MONTHLY REPORTS ANNUAL REPORTS PRESENTATIONS

16 HOW TO WRITE AN EFFECTIVE REPORT Know your topic well: Do all your background research before you begin Prepare a detailed outline: The report has to have a logical flow of ideas and narrative Move from one topic to another in a logical, cohesive style. Connect one paragraph to another. Always support your ideas with proper facts and statistics as necessary. DO NOT ADD FILLERS. The report should only be as long or short as necessary.

17 Here are the strategies you will want to use: WRITE DIRECT SENTENCES: USE STRONG VERBS USE THE ACTIVE RATHER THAN THE PASSIVE VOICE KEEP SENTENCES CORRECT AND SIMPLE BE SPECIFIC DISTINGUISH FACT FROM FICTION WRITING GREAT REPORTS

18 Determine its purpose. What should it accomplish? Write to your readers. Who is your audience? Proceed in an orderly manner. Research – Write – Summarize. Length matters. Cover your topic, then quit. Flow logically. Lead the reader from start to finish. Appearance matters. Make it visually appealing. Review and revise. *http://biggsuccess.com/bigg-articles/how-to-write-a-great-report/ 7 POINTS TO A GREAT REPORT*

19 Before you do anything else, clearly define what your report should accomplish. Are you writing this report to persuade or inform? Will it project into the future or review the past? If you were assigned this report, discuss its aim with the person who put you in charge. Don’t proceed until you fully understand why you’re doing what you’re doing because everything else flows from that. DETERMINE ITS PURPOSE

20 Don’t use words, including jargon, that they won’t understand. Provide supplemental information at the end of the report if it will help. Resist the temptation to tout your horn too loudly – your report should do that for you. Keep your audience at the top of your mind throughout the rest of this process. You’ll look your best by looking out for your readers. WRITE FOR YOUR READERS

21 Now that you know why you’re writing the report, and to whom you’re reporting, you can begin doing your research. Once you’ve gathered all the information you need, you’re ready to start writing. When you’ve finished writing everything else, you’re ready to write your executive summary – the last thing you write will likely be the first thing your audience reads. PROCEED LOGICALLY

22 Your report should be long enough to accomplish its purpose, but not a single word longer. Anticipate questions and objections and provide responses. Don’t feel the need to fill space. Don’t be redundant. Communicate effectively – end of story! It may sound silly, but some people forget this simple rule – your report should have an introduction, the body, and a conclusion. It should flow easily from point-to-point. Lead the reader through a logical progression of the topic from beginning to end. Your first point should naturally flow into the second and so on. LENGTH & FLOW

23 Your report should be visually appealing. Your readers should get a sense of what you’re saying just by scanning it. Be liberal in your use of headers and sub-headers. Use color if your budget permits. Present large amounts of data graphically – in a chart, a graph, a table, or some other illustration. Call out important points. Be creative, but make sure it doesn’t interfere with your message. APPEARANCE

24 This is perhaps the most crucial step, and one which many people avoid. Do not assume the work is done until you’ve reviewed the report thoroughly. Take the time to check your facts and statistics. Have a couple of colleagues or good writers read the report, especially if it’s an important one. Feedback can save a bad report, and create a great one. Always check your spelling and grammar. Look for repetitions – this is a common mistake in writing. REVIEW, REVIEW, REVIEW

25 Articles, blogs, tweets, posts, and even books are being written about s. The had a humble beginning, but has quickly transformed into one of the most important communication techniques today. So, what makes an effective ? WRITING EFFECTIVE S

26 Here are some wonderful tips from Mind Tools (www.mindtools.com)www.mindtools.com Don't over-communicate by . Make good use of subject lines. Keep messages clear and brief. Be polite. Check your tone. Proofread. WHAT MAKES A GREAT ?

27 T EXAMPLES OF GOOD AND BAD S SUBJECT: meetingTEXT: See ya tomorrow – k? M SUBJECT: Meeting – September 4 – Sales Review – 2 PM TEXT: Hello Allan: Here is a quick reminder of our meeting tomorrow to review the monthly sales stats. I look forward to seeing you then in Board Rm. 2. Thanks, Mike. Sales Manager It is not difficult to see which is the good and which is the less effective one. However, people actually write s just like these.

28 Don’t use to replace in-person communications. Sometimes it’s more important to step out of your office and have a genuine conversation. Don’t use to resolve differences with a colleague or your boss. Schedule a proper in-person meeting to sit down and discuss the issues. Don’t use to express your concerns over important issues such as salary, employee evaluations, or your role and responsibilities. These are to be discussed in person. S IN THE WORKPLACE

29 Most of us spend a significant portion of our day reading and composing s. But the messages we send can be confusing to others. To write effective s, first ask yourself if you should be using at all. Sometimes, it might be better to pick up the phone. Make your s concise and to the point. Only send them to the people who really need to see them, and be clear about what you would like the recipient to do next. Remember that your s are a reflection of your professionalism and attention to detail. Try to imagine how others might interpret the tone of your message. Be polite, and always proofread what you have written before you click "send." MORE ABOUT S

30 CHALLENGES IN THE WORKPLACE

31 The workplace today has many pitfalls and challenges. Here are some of the most common areas of difficulty: MISCOMMUNICATION GOSSIP WORKPLACE HARASSMENT OR ABUSE LANGUAGE OR CULTURAL BARRIERS PERSONAL DIFFERENCES POOR INTERNAL COMMUNICATIONS PRIVACY ISSUES GENDER ISSUES ISSUES OF EQUALITY LAYOFFS & DOWNSIZING DEALING WITH A DIFFICULT SITUATION

32 To strengthen your operation, you need to learn how to effectively listen and communicate. THE KEY TO THE WORKPLACE

33 Resist the temptation to involve yourself in conflicts that do not directly involve you or your responsibilities Try to depersonalize conflicts. Instead of a "me versus you" mentality, visualize an "us versus the problem" scenario. Be open and listen to another's point of view and reflect back to the person as to what you think you heard. Limit your complaints to those directly involved in the workplace conflict. Consider a mediator if the problem gets out of control, or if the issue is too emotional to resolve in a mutual discussion. At this step, your supervisor should be involved. Take home point: It's not all about you - You may think it's a personal attack, but maybe your co-worker is just having a bad day. STRATEGIES FOR DEALING WITH WORKPLACE DIFFICULTIES

34 BE A DIPLOMAT: Always be diplomatic with others REVIVE THE ART OF CONVERSATION: Listen to others. Talk to them. Get to know your colleagues. RESPECT CULTURAL DIFFERENCES: It can be hard when we don’t understand someone’s belief system; take the time to learn – ask questions DEVELOP TRUST WITH OTHERS: This takes time and effort. Learn to trust others, and the trust will be offered in return. TAKE YOUR EMOTIONS OUT OF THE EQUATION: It’s not always about us, or how we feel. It’s important to promote professionalism. Instead of attacking someone, ask for feedback. Ask for clarification. TIPS FOR IMPROVED COMMUNICATIONS

35 My biggest challenges in workplace communications are: My strengths in workplace communications are: I have difficulty communicating this in the workplace: I can communicate this well in the workplace: LET’S GET INTERACTIVE

36 STATEMENTYESNO I am confident in my ability to handle different types of conversations I am confident in my ability to speak with my employer on any topic I am confident in my ability to be an active listener I am confident in my ability to speak professionally & appropriately I am confident in my ability to accept feedback from my employer I am confident in my ability to discuss challenging issues with my employer I am confident that I can keep my emotions out of my workplace communications CONVERSATION EXERCISE

37 STATEMENTYESNO I am confident in my ability to write appropriate s I am confident in my ability to keep my s professional I am confident in my ability to keep my s on topic I am confident in my ability to use s appropriate ly in the workplace I am confident in my ability to respond in a timely manner I am confident in my ability to use proper tone and keep them brief EXERCISE ON S

38 My main concerns about workplace s are: My main challenges with workplace s are: My strengths with workplace s are: I believe workplace s should be limited to: EXERCISE – 2

39 STATEMENTYESNO I am fully capable of creating well-written reports within the scope of my position I am fully confident in my ability to create well-written reports I am fully confident in my ability to prepare a report in a timely manner I am fully confident in my ability to present the findings of my reports in meetings I am fully confident in my ability to prepare a report without any assistance from my colleagues I am completely comfortable asking a colleague to assist me with a report EXERCISE ON REPORTS

40 The communication skills I value most in the workplace are: In my opinion, the following should not be discussed in the workplace: I would rather not deal with the following communication challenges: I take the following for granted regarding communications at work: I get most frustrated with the following communication issues at work: I try not to do the following in terms of my own communications: EXERCISE ON COMMUNICATION

41 THANK YOU FOR JOINING US END OF MODULE


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