Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Change Agency Leadership Patrick F. Bassett 202.746.5444

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Change Agency Leadership Patrick F. Bassett 202.746.5444"— Presentation transcript:

1 Change Agency Leadership Patrick F. Bassett

2 Management vs. Leadership Management vs. Leadership: What’s the Difference? Difference Forced To Choose, Most People Choose…? Why Do Most People Prefer Good Management Over Strong Leadership? What are the School’s Key Management & Leadership Opportunities & Challenges?Management & Leadership

3 Creating the Conditions for Success 1. Leading from the Middle Leading 2. Managing Difficult Conversations: High EQ needed.Difficult Conversations 3. Cultivating the First FollowersFirst Followers 4. Dan Pink on the “Science of Motivation.”“Science of Motivation.” 5. Dan & Chip Heath on Orchestrating Change: Switch: “How To Change Things When Change Is Hard”Switch 6. IDEO on Design.Design 7. Robert Kegan on Immunity to ChangeImmunity to Change 8. Pat Bassett on Seven Stages of the Change CycleSeven Stages of the Change Cycle Z-Decision-MakingZ-Decision-Making & Leadership Case StudiesCase Studies What are the essential questions regarding change in schools?essential questions

4 Creating a Movement Creating a Movement ~ Derek Sivers, Ted TalkTed Talk Of the first three dancing guys, how many are really good dancers?

5 Creating a MovementCreating a Movement – 4 Principles 1. A lone nut does something great... (PFB: Leaders don’t have to be talented, just a bit crazy.)talentedcrazy 2. …but no movement without the first follower. (PFB: You can’t care about the risk of looking crazy.) 3. Cultivate and celebrate the first follower… (PFB: Show the way, then honor the first followers: e.g., Joe Biden in catechism class) 4. …or have the courage to be the first follower. (PFB: Moral courage the 1 st virtue: Be the John Hancock to Thomas Jefferson or the Reverend Abernathy to Martin Luther King, Jr.) Return

6 See 11:00 – 13:07 Play What Motivates Adults?

7 Dan Pink’s Drive: The Surprising Truth about What Motivates Us  Extrinsic Motivators (carrot & stick) for Faculty? –Carrot (“pay for performance”); and –Stick (“probation and firing”). –How are these motivators going in school? –What are the equivalent extrinsic motivators for students?  Intrinsic Motivators for Faculty? –Autonomy –Mastery –Purpose –What are the equivalent intrinsic motivators for students? Where do we see these at work for kids?  Case Study: Name a school change agenda item we’re not making much progress on: How could we motivate a la Pink?

8 The Best Way To Pay “How Gen Y & Boomers Will Reshape Your Agenda” HBR Jul-Aug 2009 Boomers 1. High quality colleagues 2. Intellectually stimulating environment 3. Autonomy regarding work tasks 4. Flexible work arrangements 5. Access to new experiences/challenges 6. Giving back to world through work 7. Recognition from one’s employer What employees value “at least as much as compensation” Pink’s first principle, autonomy Pink’s second principle, mastery Pink’s third principle, purpose

9 The Best Way To Pay “How Gen Y & Boomers Will Reshape Your Agenda” HBR Jul-Aug 2009 Gen Y/Millenials 1. High quality colleagues 2. Flexible work arrangements 3. Prospects for advancement 4. Recognition from one’s employer 5. A steady rate of advancement/promotion 6. Access to new experiences/challenges What employees value “at least as much as compensation”

10 The Best Way To Pay “How Gen Y & Boomers Will Reshape Your Agenda” HBR Jul-Aug 2009 BoomersGen Y/Millenials 1. High quality colleagues 2. Intellectually stimulating environment 2. Flexible work arrangements 3. Autonomy regarding work tasks3. Prospects for advancement 4. Flexible work arrangements4. Recognition from one’s employer 5. Access to new experiences/challenges 5. A steady rate of advancement/promotion 6. Giving back to world through work 6. Access to new experiences/challenges 7. Recognition from one’s employer What employees value “at least as much as compensation”

11 Which motivator more aligned with organizational goals? Professional Development in Independent Schools:  “Here’s $2000 per year to spend as you like: go grow.”  “Here’s $2000 each, join or form an online PLC - professional learning community- on one of the following topics, and design your professional development program around that topic, reporting out to the faculty at the end of the year: 1.) differentiated instruction; 2.) brain-based learning; 3.) blended high-tech/high touch classroom environments; 4.) formative testing.” Return

12 The Rider vs. the Elephant 1. Direct the Rider (mind)  Find the bright spots  Script the first critical moves  Send a postcard of the destination 2. Motivate the Elephant (heart) (= Drive’s “Purpose”)  Find the feeling  Shrink the change: Limit the choices – cf. Sheena Ivenger & Jim Collin’s Great by ChoiceGreat by Choice  Teaching as relational vs. transactional –Questions of a 5-year old boy beginning school? –Is school hard? Will I be able to do it? Will you be here everyday?

13 Switch: How To Change Things When Change Is Hard ~Chip and Dan Heath 3. Shape the Path (path)  Tweak the environment  Build the habits  Rally the herd  Example: –Crystal Jones, TFA first-grade teacher in an inner city school in Atlanta where there was no kindergarten. “By the end of this school year, you are going to be third graders.” –Geoffrey Canada – “Harlem Children’s Zone” School: “If you child attends this school, he or she will go to college.”  Case Study: Name a school change agenda item we’re not making much progress on: How could we motivate a la the Heath brothers? Return

14 Robert Kegan’s Immunity to Change Well-Intentioned Goals: Case Study 1: Quitting Smoking Intentions and Actions: The Gap

15 Robert Kegan’s Immunity to Change Well-Intentioned Goals: Behaviors I Do/Don’t Do that Undermine Goal Quitting Smoking

16 Robert Kegan’s Immunity to Change Well-Intentioned Goals: Behaviors I Do/Don’t Do that Undermine Goal Quitting SmokingSneaking an occasional smoke Rewarding myself with a smoke.

17 Robert Kegan’s Immunity to Change Well- Intentioned Goals: Behaviors I Do/Don’t Do that Undermine Goal Invisible Competing Drivers Quitting Smoking Sneaking an occasional smoke Rewarding myself with a smoke.

18 Robert Kegan’s Immunity to Change Well-Intentioned Goals: Behaviors I Do/Don’t Do that Undermine Goal Invisible Competing Drivers Quitting SmokingSneaking an occasional smoke Smoking as pleasurable pastime Rewarding myself with a smoke. Smoking as anxiety reliever Smoking as oral fixation preferable to eating/weight gain Foot on gas……………………and on brake

19 Robert Kegan’s Immunity to Change Well- Intentioned Goals: Behaviors I Do/Don’t Do that Undermine Goal Invisible Competing Drivers Big, Untested Assumptions Behind Col 3 Drivers Quitting Smoking Sneaking an occasional smoke Smoking as pleasurable pastime Rewarding myself with a smoke. Smoking as anxiety reliever Smoking as oral fixation preferable to eating/weight gain

20 Robert Kegan’s Immunity to Change Well-Intentioned Goals: Behaviors I Do/Don’t Do that Undermine Goal Invisible Competing Drivers Big, Untested Assumptions Behind Col 3 Drivers Quitting SmokingSneaking an occasional smoke Smoking as pleasurable pastime I can’t find equally pleasurable alternatives Rewarding myself with a smoke. Smoking as anxiety reliever I might become someone who is not me Smoking preferable to eating/weight gain Change: Identify drivers and assumptions. Test the assumptions.

21 Robert Kegan’s Immunity to Change Well-Intentioned Goals: Case Study 2: Be an Innovator Lead the Change Agenda

22 Robert Kegan’s Immunity to Change Well-Intentioned Goals: Behaviors I Do/Don’t Do that Undermine Goal PFB Case Study 2: Be a Change Agent Lead the Change Agenda

23 Robert Kegan’s Immunity to Change Well-Intentioned Goals: Behaviors I Do/Don’t Do that Undermine Goal Case Study 2: Be a Change Agent Fail to align resources and incentives Lead the Change Agenda Make the case for the rider but not the elephant

24 Robert Kegan’s Immunity to Change Well-Intentioned Goals: Behaviors I Do/Don’t Do that Undermine Goal Invisible Competing Drivers Case Study 2: Be a Change Agent Fail to align resources and incentives Lead the Change Agenda Make the case for the rider but not the elephant

25 Robert Kegan’s Immunity to Change Well-Intentioned Goals: Behaviors I Do/Don’t Do that Undermine Goal Invisible Competing Drivers Be a Change AgentFail to align resources and incentives Keeping peace more important than effecting change Lead the Change Agenda Make the case for the rider but not the elephant Fear that you won’t have followers; that the change won’t work - seen as a failurechange won’t work

26 Robert Kegan’s Immunity to Change Well- Intentioned Goals: Behaviors I Do/Don’t Do that Undermine Goal Invisible Competing Drivers Big, Untested Assumptions Behind Col 3 Drivers Be a Change Agent Fail to align resources and incentives Keeping peace more important than effecting change Lead the Change Agenda Make the case for the rider but not the elephant Fear that the change won’t work - seen as a failure; fear change agent punished

27 Robert Kegan’s Immunity to Change Well-Intentioned Goals: Behaviors I Do/Don’t Do that Undermine Goal Invisible Competing Drivers Big, Untested Assumptions Behind Col 3 Drivers Be a Change Agent Fail to align resources and incentives Keeping peace more important than effecting change No one wants change Lead the Change Agenda Make the case for the rider but not the elephant Fear that the change won’t work - seen as a failure; fear change agent punished Failure will be punished instead of trying being rewarded Return

28 Seven Stages of the Change Cycle Source: Center for Ethical Leadership (Bill Grace, Pat Hughes, & Pat Turner), Kellogg National Leadership Program Seminar, Snoqualine, WA, 7/10/97. Reference: William Bridges, Transitions; Kurt Lewin, Field Theory in Social Science; Virginia Satir, The Satir Model; George David, Compressed Experience Workplace Simulation; Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, On Death & Dying; Tom Peters, In Search of Excellence.  The research on change indicates that there are predictable stages individuals experience whenever a major change event appears. What are they?  Exercise:  Identify 2 major change events in your life  Indicate the stages you went through as the change occurred.  As a small group determine what stages you had in common despite differences in the change events you were thinking of.

29 The Seven Stages of the Change Cycle Source: Center for Ethical Leadership (Bill Grace, Pat Hughes, & Pat Turner), Kellogg National Leadership Program Seminar, Snoqualine, WA, 7/10/97. Reference: William Bridges, Transitions; Kurt Lewin, Field Theory in Social Science; Virginia Satir, The Satir Model; George David, Compressed Experience Workplace Simulation; Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, On Death & Dying; Tom Peters, In Search of Excellence. 1. Business as Usual: the routine; the frozen state; the status quo 2. External Threat: potential disaster; propitious change event; an ending; a “death in the family”; an unfreezing via the introduction of a foreign element; disequilibrium; dissatisfaction with the status quo. 3. Denial: refusal to read the Richter scale; anger and rage; chaos.

30 The Seven Stages of the Change Cycle 4. Mourning: confusion; depression. 5. Acceptance: letting go. 6.Renewal: creativity; the incubation state of new ideas and epiphanies; new beginnings; movement; vision of what “better” might look like; reintegration; first practical steps; practice of new routines. 7.New Structure: sustainable change; the new status quo; new “frozen” state of restored equilibrium; spiritual integration; internalization and transformation of self.

31 Overcoming Resistance to Change Conventional Wisdom: Raise the Volume…  Declare war, demonize the enemy, mobilize the public Problems with Raising the Volume in School Culture…  Skepticism: Teachers are intellectuals--declarations of imminent collapse are met with suspicion.  Good is the enemy of great: Jim Collins’ Good to Great. Absence of provoking crisis makes avoidance easy.

32 Overcoming Resistance to Change Problems with Raising the Volume in School Culture…  Success: Track record of independent schools the greatest impediment to change: We can’t declare war when schools are enjoying decades of peace and prosperity. So why advocate change???? Increasingly the public identifies high quality schools with innovativeness, and least identifies innovativeness with independent schools. The independent school model may not be financially sustainable in it current incarnation of skyrocketing tuitions. What’s best for kids needs to be reasserted as institutions almost always over time gravitate towards doing what’s best for adults.

33 Effecting Change Developing Followership for Change:  Coercive model works (“We’re about to close unless all faculty including department chairs teach five classes instead of four with kids in each class”)… …but it works at a high cost to morale.  Appeal to idealism works (“We have an opportunity to create a new model here and become pioneers”)… …but it works only if you have a highly committed “band of brothers” and strong, visionary, and inspirational leadership.

34 Effecting Change Developing Buy-in for Change:  Mutual benefit (“What’s in it for me?”) model works (“Beyond supporting this direction because ‘it’s the right thing to do,’ we are designing a new framework that is mutually beneficial to the school and its staff”)… …but it works only if you build in significant incentives.

35 Effecting Change Alternative to Conventional Wisdom (Raise the Volume)… Lower the Noise… By…  Talking about/Personalizing Change: Anticipating the Seven Stages  Betting on the Fastest Horses

36 Acknowledging Denial & Mourning All change begins not with a beginning but an ending. Example: Getting married = end of… being single unconditional love having your own bathroom (and towels) the sports car

37 Effecting Change Abstracting and Personalizing Change Faculty exercise: What are your own major change events? A move? Marriage? Admin job? Can we predict & prepare for stages?

38 Change Agency: Bet on the Fast Horses  Main Impediment to Change: Consensus model of decision making. (“My biggest challenge is convincing my faculty members that they are not self-employed.”) ~Lou Salza  Coalition-building Model: Betting on the Fastest Horses: targeted buy-in via modeling. Ride the “tipping point” horses. (Malcolm Gladwell’s mavens, connectors, and salespeople).  Recruiting “the coalition of the willing.” Margaret Mead Dictum: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”

39 Case Studies  Our School’s Challenges & Opportunities Our School’s  Student and School Outcomes for the 21 st C: Demonstrations of Learning Demonstrations of Learning  Professionalizing the Profession Profession

40 Change Agency Case Study #1 Professionalizing the Profession

41 Strategic Issue: Professionalizing the Profession - Source: Katherine Boles, HGSE/NAIS Seminar, Nov CharacteristicNot a ProfessionA Profession Career PathEgalitarianism — no career ladder Recognition for achievement — clearly defined career path Professional RelationshipsIsolation — practice is a freelance craft Teaming — practices characterized by teamwork and collaboration Entry and TrainingPoor preparation — "anyone can do it" Rigor — High entry requirements: standards, skills, testing InductionLittle or no mentoringMentoring is the expectation & the norm Professional DevelopmentWeak or nonexistentIntegral to the career ResearchPractice unrelated to research Research informs practice AccountabilityOutcomes unrelated to promotion and salary Accountability across the board Power StructureLittle impact on institutional decisions Shared decision making

42 The End! “So what’s it gonna be, eh?” A Clockwork Orange

43 NAIS Strategic Planning: Breakout Groups (partnerships; school of future; sustainability, etc.) Why doesn’t anyone want to sit at the innovation table? Return

44 Design Thinking by IDEO (Fred Dust)  Know the threats to your value proposition. For Higher Ed? For independent schools? –Fred Dust: The moment Google starts hiring smart self- educated people who submit digital portfolios of what they can do instead of college transcripts of what they know, the higher ed value proposition is in jeopardy. –PFB: High Tech High. Denver & St. Louis Magnet SchoolsMagnet Schools  Question assumptions about your users. Look, don’t just ask, because you'll get misinformation: What kind of music do you listen to when alone in your car? Watch people in context. (IDEO design teams include psychologists and anthropologists.) –What assumptions do we make about our students? Colleagues? –How do we punish those who don’t conform to cultural norms?

45 Design Thinking by IDEO (Fred Dust)  Think people first, not business or technology first. –Segway vs. Zip cars & bikes  Expand your comparative set. For schools? –Grad schools. Military. Museums. Summer Camp.  Expand your Ecosystem. School 2.0. –New School in NYC & Lighthouse School in Nantucket (and all the Semester Schools). –Dartmouth quarter plan. Blended learning ½ time.  Build your own metrics. –PFB: Demonstrations of Learning & Digital portfolios. Return

46 RSAnimate’s 21 st C. EnlightenmentRSAnimate’s 21 st C. Enlightenment Play

47 Demonstrations of Learning : “What you do, not what you know, the ultimate test of education.” ~PFB Tweet 1. Conduct a fluent conversation in a foreign language about of piece of writing in that language. 2. Write a cogent and persuasive opinion piece on a matter of public importance. 3. Declaim with passion and from memory a passage that is meaningful, of one’s own or from the culture’s literature or history. 4. Demonstrate a commitment to creating a more sustainable and global future with means that are scalable 5. Invent a machine or program a robot capable of performing a difficult physical task.

48 Demonstrations of Learning 6. Exercise leadership in arena which you have passion and expertise. 7. Using statistics, assess if a statement by a public figure is demonstrably true. 8. Assess media coverage of a global event from various cultural/national perspectives. 9. Describe a breakthrough for a project-based team on which you participated in which you contributed to overcoming a human-created obstacle. 10. Produce or perform or interpret a work of art. Return

49 Tiananmen Square Return

50

51  James Madison arrived at the Philadelphia Convention in 1787 with no positional power but a big idea.  First Speaker: Instead of reforming the Articles of Confederation, abandon them.  Few except James Madison & Alexander Hamilton came thinking the Federalist Papers were right.  Everyone left proposing a new constitution. How? How Do You Lead without Positional Power?

52 Sources of Power Sources of Positional Power:  Vested Authority: Power vis annointment  Situational Authority: Danger Sources of non-Positional Power  Informational/Expertise Power: What are the facts?  Interpersonal/Relational Power: High EQ trumps all.  Associative Power: Networking. Malcolm Gladwell’s “tipping point” leadership: maven, connector, salesperson. (Does management know who the opinion leaders are?) The Slavery Paradox of the Founding Fathers

53 Takeaways from Montpelier  Positional Power: Since it’s rooted in the “willingness of the governed” to accept the dicta of people in power or in coercion by force, outcomes often compromised.  Leaders in the Middle have real power: learn to develop it and cultivate it.  Leaders in the middle can and do change the world. Remember Margaret Meade’s observation: “Never underestimate the power of a handful of people to change the world. After all, it’s the only thing that ever does.” How Do You Lead without Positional Power? Return

54 Demonstrations of Learning : 1. Conduct a fluent conversation in a foreign language about of piece of writing in that language. (Stanford University requirement) 2. Write a cogent and persuasive opinion piece on a matter of public importance. 3. Declaim with passion and from memory a passage that is meaningful, of one’s own or from the culture’s literature or history. 4. Demonstrate a commitment to creating a more sustainable and global future with means that are scalable 5. Invent a machine or program a robot capable of performing a difficult physical task.

55 Demonstrations of Learning 6. Exercise leadership in arena which you have passion and expertise. 7. Using statistics, assess if a statement by a public figure is demonstrably true. 8. Assess media coverage of a global event from various cultural/national perspectives. (“Arab Spring” vs. 6 th grade US history unit on “causes of the revolution”) 9. Describe a breakthrough for a project-based team on which you participated in which you contributed to overcoming a human-created obstacle. 10. Produce or perform or stage or interpret a work of art. Return

56 Grant Wood’s Victorian Survival SmithsonianSmithsonian Podcast interpretation by Katy Waldman, Holton Arms SchoolKaty Waldman Return

57 The Five Cs Plus One  Character  Creativity  Communication  Collaboration  Critical Thinking  Cosmopolitanism – Cross Cultural Competency Cosmopolitanism

58 Ten (more) Trends for School Leaders to Ponder (see Top Ten Trends PPT for First Ten) 1. Boards Become Focused on the Strategic: Trendbook Disruptions in K-12 Sector Will Provide Challenges & Opportunities 3. Disruptions in Higher Ed Will Produce New Expectations 4. The Future of Mobile is the Future of Everything 5. Market Segmentation as the New Marketing Imperative 6. Cosmopolitanism Emerging as the “Sixth Competency” Schools of the Future 7. Hyper-Parenting and Under-Parenting Exerting a Heavy Toll on Kids 8. Beyond the 3 R’s of Recruitment, Reward, & Retention: Managing Talent a Priority 9. Design Thinking Migrating to Schools…and Ideas 10. Schools will be more Flexible, Accommodating, and Innovative

59 Are We Ready for the Big Shifts? (cf. MacArthur Foundation, 21 st. C. Learning)MacArthur Foundation The Big Shifts  Knowing…………….. Doing  Teacher-centered…… Student-centered  The Individual………. The Team  Consumption of Info….Construction of Meaning  Schools………………..Networks (online peers & experts)  Single Sourcing……… Crowd Sourcing  High Stakes Testing….. High Value Demonstration (robotics; oral video histories; vignettes; inventions; scholarship; etc. –all captured in a student’s digital portfolio)

60

61

62 Return

63 NAIS Film Vignettes Process : What are the facts in play? Decision-Making: IGE’s 4-way test - legal, front page, gut, role model. NAIS Case Study #1: Harsh Transitions in the Second Grade#1: (NAIS’s Take on the Issues)NAIS’s Take NAIS Case Study #2: Shock and Scandal#2 (NAIS’s Take on the Issues)NAIS’s Take NAIS Case Study #5: Clash of Styles of Leaders#5 (NAIS’s Take on the Issues)NAIS’s Take NAIS Case Study #9: Administrative Evaluations#9 (NAIS’s Take on the Issues)NAIS’s Take NAIS Case Study #11: Digging Deeper for the Campaign#11 (NAIS’s Take on the Issues)NAIS’s Take NAIS Case Study #13: Taking Charge…by a Trustee#13 (NAIS’s Take on the Issues)NAIS’s Take Download from:

64 NAIS Film Vignettes NAIS Case Study #15: Marriage of a Student#15 (NAIS’s Take on the Issues)NAIS’s Take NAIS Case Study #28: Peanuts Allergy#28 (NAIS’s Take on the Issues)NAIS’s Take NAIS Case Study #29: Anonymous Letter from the Faculty#29 (NAIS’s Take on the Issues)NAIS’s Take NAIS Case Study #30: Breaking the Rules…by the Adults#30 (NAIS’s Take on the Issues)NAIS’s Take NAIS Case Study #31: Admissions Package Deal#31 (NAIS’s Take on the Issues)NAIS’s Take Download from: Return

65 Are you prepared to face increasing competition for a decreasing number of students? “St. Louis Magnet Schools offer an EXCITING, TUITION FREE alternative for students of all ages and abilities.” Return

66 Cosmopolitanism & Global Cross-Cultural Competency

67 Cross-Cultural Intelligence (Source: Steven Jones, Consultant) One Traditional Norm Set Directness Ambition, aggressiveness, pride, initiative Independence Loyalty to job, institutions; volunteerism Strong presentation skills Seriousness Monochromic Timeliness One Multicultural Norm Set Respect, tact, diplomacy, avoid “losing face” Modesty Interdependence Loyalty to individuals, extended family Accents, body language Relaxed, playful Polychromic Whenever

68 “The Cultural Iceberg” ~Dr. Else Hamayan

69 TWO PHOTOS: Assignment: “Create the most aesthetically pleasing shot.” (Two Photos Source: Which was photographed by an American and which by an East Asian? Culture’s aphorisms: US “squeaky wheel” vs. Japan’s “nail” Same subject, different photographers: Which photo is more pleasing to you?

70 Cultural GPS (“There’s an App for that!”) iPhone App based on Geert Hofsted’s research on national cultures, helps the user “deal with the differences in thinking, feeling, and acting of people around the globe…” 98 countries 5 dimension model: Power Distance (PDI) Individualism (IDV) Masculinity (MAS) Uncertainty Avoidance (UAI) Long-Term Orientation (LTO)

71 Cultural GPS Power Distance : Level of acceptance of unequal distribution of power Low: little hierarchy, accessible superiors, belief in equity & justice, change by evolution. High: inequality accepted; hierarchy needed; inaccessible superiors; privileged power holders; change by revolution. Individualism: Level of self-reliance vs. collective reliance on clans and organizations Low: “we” orientation; relationships over tasks; duty to family, group, society; penalty involves loss of face, shame. High: “I” consciousness; private opinions valued; fulfill obligations to self; penalty involves loss of self- respect & guilt

72 Cultural GPS Masculinity: Femininity values of caring, quality of life, modesty, cooperation vs. masculinity values of achievement, success, heroism, assertiveness, competition, material reward for success. Low: quality of life, serving others, striving for consensus, small and slow valued, intuition, empathy High: performance, ambition, excelling, polarizing, work- orientation, big and fast valued, decisiveness, achievement. Uncertainty Avoidance: Extent to which ambiguity and uncertainty are threatening: seek to control or ride the wave Low: relaxed attitudes where practice more important than principle; hard work not a virtue per se, emotions not shown, dissent accepted, flexibility, fewer rules High: anxiety and stress high, work-driven, emotions accepted, conflict is threatening, need for agreement, laws, rules.

73 Cultural GPS Long-Term Orientation: Future-oriented perspective aligned with a society’s search for virtue vs. conventional, historical, or short-term point of view, normative thinking Low: conventional, seek stability & absolute truth, need quick results High: see many truths, pragmatic, change-adept, persevere

74 Cultural GPS: U.S. vs. Japan PFB… in Japan: Tsunami Headlines. Department Chair Selection …in China: Getting on the bus….

75 What Countries Like/Unlike US?

76 Cultural GPS: U.S. (GNP) vs. Bhutan (GNH) Return

77 Myers-Briggs Myers-Briggs Z+2 Model I/E (introvert/extrovert); S/N (sensing/intuition); T/F (thinking/feeling); J/P (judging/perceiving) Adapted from The Zig-Zag ™ Process for Problem Solving, developed by Gordon D. Lawrence, Center for Applications of Psychological Type, Inc., How do you make decisions? How do you process info? S (Sensing): What problem are we trying to solve? What are the facts, details, frequency? N (iNtuition): What are the patterns and theories for why this might be happening? How do we brainstorm solutions? T (Thinking): What are the criteria by which we should make this decision? What is the logical way to address the problem? The ethical dimensions? F (Feeling): What is the impact on people? How can we deliver this info in the best way to get results? See “slow thinking” process in the “Bassett Blog on the Horns of a Dilemma”Bassett Blog on the Horns of a Dilemma Return

78 “Essential Questions” To Ask about School Change?  Today: Where is your division or school today on a scale of 1 – 10 on the education philosophy spectrum?  1 = classical, traditional teacher-centered education (“the best of the past & present”)  10 = experimental, experiential, project-based, discovery-oriented, student-centered, high-tech + high touch (“the best of the 21 st C.”)  Tomorrow: Where do you want it to be?  1-5 is improvement model for “We’re right where we should be”  5-10 transformation model for “There’s work to do.” (Change required for either end of the spectrum.)  Appreciative Inquiry (AI): What are the advantages you have that can “grease the wheels” of change? What are the impediments to change in your school?

79 Essential Questions  Given the “brush-fire” reality & chaos of daily senior management in schools, how do you balance your obligations to manage vs. your opportunity to lead?  What are the Messages We Should Send about Change to Parents & Faculty?  Message to Parents: “We’re preparing children for their future, not your past.”  Message to Faculty: “Don’t bother with the ‘The colleges (or secondary schools) won’t like it’ excuse: The colleges (or secondary schools) will like it.” (Ask them.) Return

80 Small, Disciplined Experiments Choose to be Great by Choice Roald Amundsen vs. Robert Falcon Scott, in their efforts to lead their teams to be the first to the South Pole in October 1911 Adopt the discipline of “the 20 – mile march” Empirical creativity vs. intuition First “shoot bullets, not missiles” Return

81 Grant Wood’s Victorian Survival SmithsonianSmithsonian Podcast interpretation by Katy Waldman, Holton Arms SchoolKaty Waldman Demonstration of Learning Return

82 The End! Patrick F. Bassett

83 Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most by Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, and Sheila Heen How’s the project coming? Fine, thanks. You’re holding me up. You’re a jerk. I hate you. Levels: Stated vs. Implied. Business at hand vs. Threats to my image.

84 Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most by Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, and Sheila Heen. Can it wait? I’m busy Puzzle: Mishandled conversations create the very outcomes we dread. She doesn’t get what my work demands.. Fine. You think you’re only busy one? You don’t love me. The Spouse/Partner Version Return

85 Myers-Briggs Profiles  Extraverted (E) - Introverted (I)  Sensing (S) - Intuition (N)  Thinking (T) - Feeling (F)  Judging (J) - Perceiving (P) Our School Leaders: ENTJ = 3 ENFP = 2 ENFJ = 3 INFJ = 4 INTJ = 1

86 ENTJ ENTJ Description "I don't care to sit by the window on an airplane. If I can't control it, why look?“ Natural tendency to marshal and direct Bent to plan creatively and to make those plans reality ENTJs are often "larger than life" Salesmanship, story-telling facility TRADEMARK: -- "I'm really sorry you have to die." ENTJs are decisive. They see what needs to be done, and frequently assign roles to their fellows. ENTJs may by reflex become argumentative: the ENTJ is not one to be trifled with.

87 FAMOUS ENTJs Franklin D. Roosevelt Richard M. Nixon Lamar Alexander (US Senator) Jim Carrey (Ace Ventura: Pet Detective, The Mask) Rahm Emanuel, White House Chief of Staff Harrison Ford Steve Jobs Dave Letterman General Norman Schwarzkopf Margaret Thatcher

88 ENFP ENFP Description Both "idea"-people and "people"-people, who see everyone and everything as part of a cosmic whole. Outgoing and warm, and genuinely like people Often have strong, if sometimes surprising, values and viewpoints Use their social skills and contacts to persuade others gently (though enthusiastically) of the rightness of these views; this sometimes results in the ENFP neglecting their nearest and dearest while caught up their efforts to change the world. In the workplace, ENFPs interact in a positive and creative manner with both their co-workers and the public. Major asset in brainstorming sessions; follow-through on projects can be a problem, however. ENFPs do get distracted, especially if another interesting issue comes along.

89 FAMOUS ENFPs Franz Joseph Haydn Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain) Will Rogers Buster Keaton Theodor "Dr." Seuss Geisel (The Cat in the Hat) Paul Harvey Elizabeth Montgomery (Bewitched) Bill Cosby (Ghost Dad) Dave Thomas, owner of Wendy's hamburger chain Lewis Grizzard, newspaper columnist

90 ENFJ ENFJ Description ENFJs are the benevolent 'pedagogues' of humanity. They have tremendous charisma Power to manipulate others with their phenomenal interpersonal skills and unique salesmanship. But it's usually not meant as manipulation -- ENFJs generally believe in their dreams, and see themselves as helpers and enablers, which they usually are. ENFJs are global learners. They see the big picture. Focus is expansive. Some can juggle an amazing number of responsibilities or projects simultaneously. Many ENFJs have tremendous entrepreneurial ability. ENFJs are, by definition, Js, with whom we associate organization and decisiveness TRADEMARK: "The first shall be last"

91 FAMOUS ENFJs David, King of Israel Abraham Lincoln Ronald Reagan Barack Obama Abraham Maslow, psychologist and proponent of self-actualization Ross Perot Sean Connery Elizabeth Dole Francois Mitterand Diane Sawyer (Good Morning America) Michael Jordan, NBA basketball player Johnny Depp (Pirates of the Caribbean) Oprah Winfrey

92 INFJ INFJ Description Complexity of character and the unusual range and depth of their talents. Strongly humanitarian in outlook, INFJs tend to be idealists Generally "doers" as well as dreamers. INFJs are deeply concerned about their relations with individuals as well as the state of humanity at large. Alternation between detachment and involvement in the lives of the people around them may give the clearest insights of all the types into the motivations of others, for good and for evil. Strong writing skills and personal charisma make INFJs generally well-suited to the "inspirational" professions such as teaching "There's something rotten in Denmark." Accurately suspicious about others' motives, and not easily led. These are the people that you can rarely fool any of the time.

93 FAMOUS INFJs Nathan, prophet of Israel Aristophanes Chaucer Goethe Robert Burns, Scottish poet James Earl "Jimmy" Carter Nathaniel Hawthorne Mother Teresa of Calcutta Martin Luther King, Jr., civil rights leader, martyr James Reston, newspaper reporter Carol Moseley-Braun (D-IL) Nelson Mandela

94 INTJ INTJ Description Project an aura of "definiteness" and self-confidence Perfectionists, with endless capacity for improving upon anything An unusual independence of mind, freeing the INTJ from the constraints of authority, convention, or sentiment for its own sake Systems Builders" because they combine imagination and reliability INTJs have also been known to take it upon themselves to implement critical decisions without consulting their supervisors or co-workers.. INTJs can rise to management positions as they learn to simulate some degree of surface conformism in order to mask their inherent unconventionality. Tend to have little patience and less understanding of such things as small talk as they are usually extremely private people, and can often be naturally impassive

95 FAMOUS INTJs Susan B. Anthony Augustus Caesar (Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus) Jane Austen (Pride and Prejudice) William F. Buckley, Jr. Katie Couric Rudy Giuliani, former New York City mayor Hannibal, Carthaginian military leader Charles Everett Koop C. S. Lewis (The Chronicles of Narnia) Martina Navratilova Michelle Obama General Colin Powell, former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, US Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson John F. Kennedy Woodrow Wilson Return

96 Our School’s Key Management and Leadership Opportunities & Challenges  To build the new team as a high-functioning team  To build confidence among the constituencies in the school and its leadership (faculty/staff; students; parents; board; alumni)  To manage the disruptive elements of change in leadership in school operations and of innovation in programming  To learn leadership/team strategies & rubrics to make good, data-driven decisions  To create rubrics for measuring our effectiveness (Balanced Scorecard: i.) financial; ii.) customer satisfaction; iii.) operational efficiencies; iv) innovation/staff growth)

97 Our School’s Key Management and Leadership Opportunities & Challenges  To navigate and understand the culture: school; sector; country; locale  To adopt a growth (vs. fixed) mindset individually and as a team  To learn how to amplify leadership’s impact  To adopt a posture and approach to the daily crises of schools: who is involved; who is informed; who makes the decision; attitude toward team dissent; how is it communicated; etc.  Audit, review and assessment of policies & procedures & risk management.

98 Our School’s Key Management and Leadership Opportunities & Challenges  Communications strategy in general, internal and external. Clarity on path regarding operations and program. Validating existing norms. Articulating what won’t change. Identifying and affirming core values.  Determine the new story of the school, moving forward? Identify our core pedagogy and philosophy. End goal of Nido education? How do we define ourselves? Once done, how do we backward design curriculum?  Develop a new facilities master plan.  Disagreements/Management with the Board occupies too much of the leadership teams’ time and energy – micromanaging an issue. Transparency & lack of information, distrust a cause? Return


Download ppt "Change Agency Leadership Patrick F. Bassett 202.746.5444"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google