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+ Quiz Four You will have 20 minutes to write a short essay response to this prompt. You may use your copy of Coraline and any notes that you took during.

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Presentation on theme: "+ Quiz Four You will have 20 minutes to write a short essay response to this prompt. You may use your copy of Coraline and any notes that you took during."— Presentation transcript:

1 + Quiz Four You will have 20 minutes to write a short essay response to this prompt. You may use your copy of Coraline and any notes that you took during the movie. I would suggest that you draw up a quick outline first and then write your response. Discuss the primary differences between Neil Gaiman’s novel Coraline and Henry Selick’s film version in terms of characters and plot.

2 + How comfortable would you be sharing Coraline with young readers? What could go wrong? What would be fun about it?

3 + What was Neil Gaiman thinking? What was his impetus for writing a book like Coraline? “More then ten years ago I started to write a children’s book. It was for my daughter, Holly, who was five years old. I wanted it to have a girl as a heroine, and I wanted it to be refreshingly creepy…. It was a story, I learned when people began to read it, that children experienced as an adventure, but which gave adults nightmares. It's the strangest book I've written, it took the longest time to write, and it's the book I'm proudest of.”

4 + The Gothic and Coraline Makin' up a song about Coraline She's a peach, she's a doll, she's a pal of mine She's as cute as a button In the eyes of everyone who ever laid their eyes on Coraline When she comes around exploring Mom and I will never, ever make it boring Our eyes will be on Coraline

5 + Definition of The Gothic The Gothic novel’s ” principal aim was to evoke chilling terror by exploiting mystery, cruelty, and a variety of horrors. The term ‘gothic’ has also been extended to denote a type of fiction which lacks the medieval setting but develops a brooding atmosphere of gloom or terror, represents events which are uncanny, or macabre, or melodramatically violent, and often deals with aberrant psychological states” (Abrams, A Glossary of Literary Terms ).

6 + Gothic Elements: Setting Old houses with trap doors, secret passage ways, strange sounds, mysterious doors. The macabre setting is meant to produce feelings of psychological dread.

7 + Gothic Elements: Atmosphere Everything in a gothic text is shrouded in mystery. Authors create a sense of the uncanny (things being off a little; a bit askew), of suspense, of intrigue, of creepiness.

8 + Gothic Elements: Female Characters in Distress The tradition of “the damsel in distress” permeates Gothic fiction; yet, Gaiman plays with this idea: his heroine is in distress, but she rescues herself.

9 + Gothic Elements: The Doppelgänger German word meaning “double goer,” referring to the supernatural presence of oneself. Often, the Doppelgänger brings with it associations of evil. Gothic literature will often dwell upon “a hidden or double reality beneath the surface of what at first appears to be a single narrative” (Sedgwick 12).

10 + Gothic Elements: The Supernatural Gothic literature focuses on the fact that as much as we may try to suppress the uncanny, the grotesque, or the strange, these things are truly a part of human existence, and we need to acknowledge this fact.

11 + Famous Precursors Horace Walpole's The Castle of Otranto: A Gothick Story (1764) Ann Radcliffe's The Mysteries of Udolpho (1794) Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (1818)

12 + Gothic Children’s Literature Scary, creepy, and ubiquitious

13 + Gothic Elements Not really the exception…more like the rule.

14 ModelSummary The Romantic ChildThe child “as superior to adults in some ways and as aligned with nature, beauty or spirituality.” The Sinful ChildThe child as inherently evil and in need of control and/or correction. The Working ChildThe child as competent and resilient. The Sacred ChildThe child as “precious and fragile” and in need of protection The Child as Radically OtherThe idea that childhood is a distinctive and separate time from childhood. The Developing ChildThe idea that childhood is on a continuum with adulthood. The Child as Miniature AdultThe child is just an adult in miniature, capable of possessing an adult view of the world. Looking for Clues in the Models of Childhood

15 + The Different Ending Wybie Lovat

16 + Homework #1 Due on Wednesday!


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