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Proposal Preparation 101 Grants for Lunch September 29, 2010.

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Presentation on theme: "Proposal Preparation 101 Grants for Lunch September 29, 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 Proposal Preparation 101 Grants for Lunch September 29, 2010

2 Who we are: UAF GIFT Center Jenny Flynn Associate VP, Foundation Development/GIFT Center (520) Kelly Holt Associate Director, Foundation Development/GIFT Center (520) Marie-Claire Sträng Assistant Director, Foundation Development/GIFT Center (520)

3 A little more about the GIFT Center Supported ~ 200 University projects and helped to raise more than $36,000,000. Projects range from adaptive athletics to basic science to social justice programs for kids. We offer workshops, a listserv, website, one-on- one fundraising consulting, and proposal support.website Extensive online info center. Center is located in suite 302 of the Swede Johnson Building, northwest corner of Speedway and Cherry.online info center

4 Executive summary exercise… GIFT Center magic…you are a program officer! The UA Media Center experienced a roof leak last summer. Eight thousand dollars would allow us to fix the flood damage and refurnish the studio. The work would be completed in the fall of YOUR JOB: 1. Table discussions. Are you intrigued to know more? Why or why not? 2. Group discussion. Thumb’s up or down?

5 Proposal Fairy RX* The UA Media Center experienced a roof leak last summer. Eight thousand dollars would allow us to fix the flood damage and refurnish the studio. The work would be completed in the fall of What’s wrong? How to fix? Where do the missing pieces come from? *See Good Friend Foundation Executive Summary Guidelines in your packet.

6 C. In advance, work through a logical, creative, and collaborative planning process. Pop Quiz! In an ideal world, how do you prepare for a proposal? A. Bang on the keyboard until you hit that elusive inspiration key. B. Freak out, then respond as well as you can to the funder’s questions a day before the proposal is due (or maybe into the wee hours of the night).

7 Proposals: Although necessity is sometimes the mother of invention, there is actually a better way.

8 Today we will: Explore program planning elements critical in successful grantseeking. Use the GIFT Center project concept form and associated tools as our guide, focusing on some tricky parts.  Take a bird’s eye view…the WHY? and addressing your community.  Plan for action…the HOW? through implementation steps, evaluation, and partnerships.  Move it forward…some WHO and WHAT steps related to sustainability, collaboration, and internal requirements.

9 Program Planning Element PCF CounterpartLOI/Proposal (see GIFT Center website) Overview What? Who? Why? 1.Title 2.*One Sentence Summary Introduction Executive Summary Community 3.Unit priorities 4.Broader community issue. Organizational information Need or problem statement Impact 5.*Who will benefit? 6.Problem/Need/Impact Statement Program description and throughout Implementation 7.Goals & Objectives 8.Action Plan 9.Needed resources 10.*Project budget Program description Goals & objectives Evaluation 11.*Evaluative tools Addressing all of the above. Program description Goals & objectives Impact Sustainability/Collaboration 12.*Collaborative partners (external & internal) 13.Funding prospects 14.Advisory board Program description Dissemination Sustainability Internal Vetting 15.Business manager 16.Unit/faculty information 17.Signature requirements Budget Organizational information Program planning and proposal parts alignment or, look to the left!

10 Project Concept Form—blank  It looks like this. Please take out your blank copy, filling in key sections as we go. Sections are numbered. Process mirrors expectations of private grantmakers.

11 Project Concept Form—KOHT  We have also provided a completed sample for an invented program, Know Our History Tucson, to help make the process concrete. Outreach model used ► easy for diverse audience to grasp quickly.

12 Bird’s eye view… The Project Concept Form—or any planning tool—can be completed in any order. Programs (and brains) differ. Some start with a program title (1). Good “big picture” exercise. For private grantmakers, titles should be strong, creative, short (<10 words), and convey what you do. Another good exercise: Try to capture the essence of your entire program in just one sentence (2). Who, What, Where, Why?

13 One Sentence Exercise… Using your own program or idea as a model, or making up something fun, write ONE sentence on your blank Project Concept Form at (2) describing: ■ What you will do? ■ Where it will take place? ■ Who you will serve? ■ WHY—what difference will it make? EXAMPLE: Know Our History Tucson (KOHT) is an annual University-led program that brings middle school students, senior citizens, public school teachers, graduate students, and University faculty expertise and enthusiasm together in a distinctive oral history project, shared with the community through exhibits, that both preserves local history and sheds light on how it shapes our lives today.

14 Bird’s eye view…identifying your communities ■ Internal: Where do you fit within the University, your unit, and your unit’s fundraising priorities*? (3) ■ External: What issues are you addressing? Be sure to place your project within a field of related work. (Program officer: “Do your homework.”) (4) *Psst...A project is more likely to become a priority if you have a good plan and a start on partnerships. (More ahead at #12.)

15 Bird’s eye view… Who will benefit? (5) Be specific and creative. KOHT: middle school teachers, students, seniors, Tucson community. What is the problem and need for your program? (6) (Usually an easy section.) What impact (6.5) will you make on the community you identified? Now don’t get nervous, but I’m going to ask a very personal question…

16 Bird’s eye view… Consider, just how are you changing the world? (6.5) Seems big, but you’re doing it in specific ways: Impact Statement Example KOHT makes Tucson history come alive, increasing historical knowledge and understanding, linking generations in valuing and sharing the historical perspectives of our community’s elders, and shedding light on how history continues to shape our lives today.

17 Bird’s eye view…Impact BROAD Make a lot of baby turtles to increase the odds a few will reach the goal DEEP Make a few primates and give a lot of love so most reach the goal

18 Let’s play…Are you a turtle or a primate? Turtle/Broad Primate/Deep Your project (if applicable)? Know Our History Tucson? There are many other forms of impact, e.g., in research a big shift in thinking or technology. *See Describing Impact in Your Proposal in your packet

19 Getting more specific about your vision. Considering the critical resources, activities, and time that you will need. Creating a plan for measuring your progress and success. Planning for Action… a.k.a., HOW? Determining HOW will involve: IMPACT

20 Stating the objectives of your program. (7) Indicators Increased interest in history among middle school student participants. Nurtured pride and self-worth among local senior citizens. Objectives In the next program year, KOHT will:  Provide at least 200 middle school students and 100 senior citizens with oral history preservation experience.  75% of participating students will report greater interest in and enthusiasm for history, and knowledge of local history.  95% of seniors will report feeling they made a difference with their project participation. Implementation steps…who, what, where, and when? (8) Planning for Action… BIG picture to bite sized portions.

21 How will you identify necessary program adjustments? How will you know that or if you were successful? (10) Planning for Action… Two critical ingredients. What resources, human and otherwise, are needed for each step? (Hold that thought…) (9)

22 Planning for Action… What resources, human and otherwise, are needed for each step? What resources are already available? University, staff time, space, and partners (funding and community). Assign specific dollar amounts to your required resources. (11) BUDGETING!

23 Planning for Action… BUDGETING. Annual and BIG financial picture. Your unit business office is a great resource with budget planning. They are accustomed to thinking things through financially. Unit financial coordinator and can help you adhere with UA fiscal policies. There are budget templates in your packets and private grant budgeting tips on the GIFT Center website.

24 Planning for Action…E valuation. Creating a plan for measuring your progress and success. 1. How will you know your program is appropriately progressing? 2. How will you know you were successful? 3. How will you demonstrate impact? With funders and others. (Project planning gone wild.) When developing an evaluation plan, consider:

25 Planning for Action…E valuation. Just a few ideas and tools to consider:  Participant behavioral and attitudinal changes (pre- & post-testing, verbal or anecdotal feedback, opinion surveys)  Application of skill development (teachers, job skills/employment)  Long-term changes (improved academic performance, college enrollment) Impact, impact, impact. Do your evaluation results meaningfully address impact?

26 Planning for Action…E valuation. Impact Statement Example KOHT makes Tucson history come alive, increasing historical knowledge and understanding, linking generations in valuing and sharing the historical perspectives of our community’s elders, and shedding light on how history continues to shape our lives today. ACTIVITY Using your own program or the KOHT impact statement sample, work with your neighbor and/or others at your table to identify: 1.What might you measure that will demonstrate program progress and impact? 2.What tools (or data) might you use? (Hint: Revisit sample KOHT objectives from earlier slide.)

27 Planning for Action… Evaluation. There are hundreds of tools and a variety of words that are used and available for developing an evaluation plan. One popular and often helpful tool is the logic model. There are two examples in your packets. I NPUTS O BJECTIVES O UTPUTS O UTCOMES D ELIVERABLES I MPACT S TRATEGY B ENEFIT

28 Planning for Action/Helpful Resources In your packet Project Concept Form Budget planning templates The Change Map and Logic Model templates On Campus Unit business office Unit development office Sponsored Projects Services Evaluation Research and Development (ERAD) Evaluation Research and Development On the web GIFT Center— Foundation Center— Pima County Public Library— Grants & Nonprofit Info Center JUST GRANTS! Arizona

29 Moving It Forward One of the most challenging proposal areas is the “dread sustainability question.” (12, 13, 14) It’s less dread when you think in terms of assets and partnerships, not just $$. The Dread Pirate Sustainability

30 Moving It Forward – Thinking Sustainability Are there internal and external community partners? Who is doing similar work? Who is a resource or expert that can and will move your work forward? (12) Existing funders and funding prospects. (13) Advisory boards. Both as expert guidance and as support for finding other resources. (14)

31 Moving It Forward – Asset Inventory Exercise An asset inventory is a brainstorming exercise to help you identify what you have and build from there toward sustainability. On a piece of paper, write down everything and everyone you can think of for your project: Human Assets & Resources—Who do you know? Physical Assets & Resources—What you do you have?

32 Moving it Forward – Asset Inventory Results Human Assets and Resources—what did you come up with? KOHT examples: Museum friends, history teachers, kids, parents, teachers, school administrators, senior program professionals, Pima Council on Aging, event sponsors, museum partners, history department members, media, local government officials Your examples: Physical Assets—what did you come up with? KOHT examples: exhibits, stories (recorded, text form), community reputation and expectation Your examples:

33 Moving It Forward – Internal Policies Required as part of an institution our size. Business offices as a valuable resource. (15) Unit specific requirements…priorities, routing, buy-in. (3, 16, 17) The GIFT Center. Project Concept Form signature requirement helps ensure all of the above.

34 But it IS critically helpful and necessary for: Answering the “WHY?” and avoiding $ chasing. Offering internal stakeholders and external partners a clear and compelling case. Demonstrating your creativity and thoughtfulness. Navigating through difficult proposal sections. With proper planning, the proposal writes itself.* Program Planning – It Ain’t Sexy! *More or less.

35 Moving It Forward – Now You’re Ready Program Planning Element PCF CounterpartLOI/Proposal Overview What? Who? Why? 1.Title 2.*One Sentence Summary Introduction Executive Summary Community 3.Unit priorities 4.Broader community issue. Organizational information Need or problem statement Impact 5.*Who will benefit? 6.Problem/Need Statement Program description and throughout Implementation 7.Goals & Objectives 8.*Action Plan 9.Needed resources 10.*Project budget Program description Goals & objectives Evaluation 11.*Evaluative tools Addressing all of the above. Program description Goals & objectives Impact Sustainability/Collaboration 12.Collaborative partners (external & internal) 13.*Funding prospects 14.Advisory board Program description Dissemination Sustainability Internal Vetting 15.Business manager 16.Unit/faculty information 17.Signature requirements Budget Organizational information

36 Contact the GIFT Center at Passing the proposal fairy wand over your planning efforts…


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