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Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section.

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Presentation on theme: "Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section."— Presentation transcript:

1 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Harold Kerns Raised in New York city, Harold kerns earned a B.A and a law degree at Harvard, studied at Oxford university, worked as a partner in a Washington DC law firm, was the subject of a long –running Broadway play, and wrote a popular television movie-all despite the fact that he was born blind. His “i-A” classification by a local draft board, which doubted the severity of his handicap, brought about the 1969 Broadway hit play Butterflies Are Free by Leonard Gorse. Kerns once explained that he was merely the “prototype’ for the central character.” I gave the story its inspiration-the play’s plot is not my story; its spirits is. In 1972 Kerns wrote To Race the Wind, which was made into a CBS-TV movie in During his career as a lawyer, Kerns worked hard to expand legal protection for the handicapped and fought to secure their right to equal opportunity in the business world. He died in 1987 of a brain tumor.. Butterflies are Free

2 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Harold Kerns Butterflies Are Free It is a 1969 play by Leonard Gorse that was produced on Broadway at the Booth Theatre between 21 October 1969 and 2 July Gorse also wrote the screen adaptation for the 1972 film with Eileen Hackers, Goldie Hawn and Edward Albert.Loosely based on the life of Harold Kerns ( ), the play concerns a blind man named Don Baker (Albert), who lives in San Francisco where he meets a hippy girl named Jill (Hawn) and must deal with his controlling mother (Hackett). Butterflies are Free

3 Darkness at Noon Unit observer: n. (a) one who watches carefully e.g. she is a keen observer of nature. (b) One who pays attention to rules.etc. one who celebrates festivals, birthdays, anniversaries, etc? e.g. Americans are observers of Christmas Day observant adj. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

4 Darkness at Noon Unit narcissistic: obsessively and exclusively interested in one’s own self e.g. Women were believed to be more narcissistic than men. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

5 Darkness at Noon Unit to date : up to now e.g. To date migrant workers have been still looked down upon is spite of their contribution. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

6 Darkness at Noon Unit converse: vi.talk e.g. My teacher conversed with me about my future career adj.(idea, statement which is ) opposite ( to another) e.g. He always likes to put forward converse ideas in class. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

7 Darkness at Noon Unit enunciate: vt.&vi. (a) say or pronounce words clearly e.g. He enunciates his words clearly. (b) expresses a theory, etc clearly or definitely e.g. She enunciated her feminist theory in this book. enunciation n. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

8 Darkness at Noon Unit invariably: never changing constantly e.g. Our love to our motherland is invariably rooted in our hearts. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

9 Darkness at Noon Unit pick up: (a) take hold of and lift e.g. He picked up his hat on the table and left. (b) gain; acquire e.g. She picked up a livelihood by selling things from door to door (c) recover; regain e.g. You’ll soon pick up health when you get to the seaside. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

10 Darkness at Noon Unit dread: n. great fear and anxiety e.g. She lives in constant dread of poverty. vt.&vi. fear greatly e.g. I dread having to visit he dentist. dreadful adj. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

11 Darkness at Noon Unit retina: n. layer of membrane at the back of the eyeball, sensitive to light e.g. If one’s retina detaches, he or she’ll become blind at once. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

12 Darkness at Noon Unit detach: vt. (a)unfasten and take apart; separate e.g. He detached a link from a chain (b) Armed forces) send (a party of men, ships, etc) away from the main e.g. A number of men was detached to guard the right flank. detached adj. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

13 Darkness at Noon Unit inform somebody of something: give knowledge to e.g. Keep me informed of new developments in the field. Have you informed them of your intended departure? Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

14 Darkness at Noon Unit previously: adv. before e.g. We had know the power of nature previously previous adj. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

15 Darkness at Noon Unit respond: vt.&vi. (a) act in answer to e.g. when jack insulted Jill, she responded with a kick. (b). react to; be affected by e.g. the illness quickly responded to treatment Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

16 Darkness at Noon Unit graphically: adv. by writing ordiagrams, (fig) vividly e.g. He illustrated his ideas graphically. graphic adj. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

17 Darkness at Noon Unit drive something home: make something completely clear e.g. He is the students’ favorite teacher, and one of his strong points is that he excels in driving His lecture home to his audience. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

18 Darkness at Noon Unit firm: adj. (a) solid hard e.g. His position is as firm as a rock. (b) Not easily changed or influenced e.g. She has a firm faith in the future of the world. (c) Of a person his body, its movements characteristics, etc) steady stable e.g. The baby is not very firm on its feet yet He gave me a firm glance. firmness n. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

19 Darkness at Noon Unit hospitalize: vt. send to hospital; admit into hospital e.g. He was hospitalized with lung cancer. hospitalization n. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

20 Darkness at Noon Unit orderly: adj. (a) well arranged; in good order; tidy e.g. She likes an orderly room (b) ell-behaved; obedient to discipline e.g. An orderly crowd was standing in the rain to pay tribute to the hero. orderliness n. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

21 Darkness at Noon Unit intone : vt. &vi.recite a prayer, psalm, etc in a singing tone, speak with a particular tone e.g. They are intoning a Christmas song in the church. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

22 Darkness at Noon Unit approximately: adv. about, nearly e.g. The area of my land is half an acre approximately. approximate adj. ; vt.& vi. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

23 Darkness at Noon Unit disposition: n. (a) arrangement; placing in order e.g. The disposition of furniture in his room is wonderful (b) Person’s natural qualities of mind and character e.g. He is a man with a cheerful disposition (c) inclination e.g. There was a general disposition the leave early (d) power of ordering and disposing e.g. Who has the disposition of this property? dispose vt.&vi. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

24 Darkness at Noon Unit desert: vt.&vi. (a) leave; go away from e.g. We sheltered from the storm in a deserted hut (b) leave without help or support, esp. in a wrong or cruel way e.g. He deserted his wife and children and went abroad (c) run away from; leave without authority or permission e.g. A solider that deserts his post in time of war is punished severely (d) fail e.g. His courage deserted him. desertion n. deserter n. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

25 Darkness at Noon Unit blurt out: tell something suddenly and often thoughtlessly e.g. she blurted out the secret of her boyfriend the other day at the family union Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

26 Darkness at Noon Unit misconception: n. misconceiving; instance of wrong understanding e.g. She has a misconception of love. misconceive vt. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

27 Darkness at Noon Unit ridiculous: adj.deserving to be laughed at; absurd e.g. You look ridiculous in those tight jeans. What a ridiculous idea! ridiculously adv. ridicule n.&vt. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

28 Darkness at Noon Unit turn down: (a) cause to fold down e.g. He turned down his coat collar and left in a hurry. (b) reduce by turning a wheel or tap e.g. He turned down the lamps to make romantic air the room. (c) refuse to consider an offer, a proposal e.g. He tried to join the army but was turned down because of poor health. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

29 Darkness at Noon Unit qualification: n. (a) act of qualifying, modifying of limiting; something which modifies, restricts of limits e.g. You can accept his statement without qualification. (b) training, test, etc that qualifies a person, degree, diploma, rewarded at the end of such training. e.g. She got a doctor’s qualifications after training. qualify vt.&vi Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

30 Darkness at Noon Unit frustration: n. defeat of disappointment e.g. She was embittered by numerous frustrations last year. frustrate vt. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

31 Darkness at Noon Unit exclusion: n. excluding or being excluded e.g. Every is allowed to vote to the exclusion of racism disillusionment n. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

32 Darkness at Noon Unit disillusion: n. set free from mistaken beliefs e.g. They had thought that the new colony would be a paradise, but them were soon disillusioned. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

33 Darkness at Noon Unit issue: vt.&vi. (a) come out; go out; flow out e.g. The blood was issuing from his wound. (b) Distribute for use or consumption e.g. They issued warm clothing to the poor people (c) publish books, etc; put stamps, banknotes, shares etc into circulation e.g. Her book was issued last year. n. (a). outgoing e.g. There was an issue blood from her nose. (b) Putting forth; sending out; publication e.g. I often buy new stamps on the day of issue. (c) question that arises for discussion e.g. They often argue political issues. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

34 Darkness at Noon Unit regulation: n. rule; order; authoritative direction e.g. Everyone should obey traffic regulations adj. as required by rules; correct. e.g. You should fill in the application forms of the regulation size. regulate vt. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

35 Darkness at Noon Unit mandate: n. order from a superior; command given with authority e.g. We got the mandate to launch an attack tonight. mandatory adj. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

36 Darkness at Noon Unit handicapped: adj. suffering from some disability e.g. We should donate more money for handicapped children. handicap n. &vt. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

37 Darkness at Noon Unit by and large: on the whole; taking everything into consideration e.g. We should carry out the plan by and large. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

38 Darkness at Noon Unit procedure: n. the regular order of doing things, esp. legal and political e.g. we should stop arguing about questions of procedure and get down to business. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

39 Darkness at Noon Unit be attached to: be bound to by love or affection e.g. She is deeply attached to her younger brother He is foolishly attached to old customs. attach vt.&vi. attachment n. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

40 Darkness at Noon Unit wander: vi. (a) go from place to place without any special purpose or destinations. e.g. They are wandering over the countryside. (b) leave the right path or direction e.g. We wandered for miles and miles in the mist. (c) be absent-minded e.g. his mind wandered back to his college days. wanderer n. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

41 Darkness at Noon Unit distinctly: adv.in a clear manner e.g. He pronounced the word distinctly. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

42 Darkness at Noon Unit plant: vt.&vi. (a) put plants, bushes, trees, etc in a garden, etc. e.g. She planted the garden with rose bushes last year. (b) cause an idea to take root in somebody’s mind e.g. The teacher planted patriotism in her students’ mind (c) take up a position or attitude e.g. He planted himself in front of the fire. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

43 Darkness at Noon Unit foreman: n. (a) workman in authority over others e.g. Her brother is the fore man of the workers. (b) chief member and spokesman in a jury e.g. The foreman will read the verdict in the afternoon. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

44 Darkness at Noon Unit come upon: (a) attack by surprise; strike e.g. Fear came upon us (b) come across e.g. I came upon a fiend of mine on the street the other day. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

45 Darkness at Noon Unit disabled: adj. unable to do something. e.g. we should show more care for the disabled ex- service men. disable vt. disablement n. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

46 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Questions Paragraph 1 Questions: (1)Why does the author use the word “observer” instead of “people”? What rhetorical device is employed here? (“Observer” means somebody who sees and notices. The author, according to the text, was an intelligent and capable man, but those “observers” simply ignored this fact owing to his blindness. They may well be called blind observers. The author uses ironic device to express his indignation at such people.) Sentence Highlights Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

47 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Paragraphs 1 Questions: (2) What does the word “narcissistic” allude to? (This word is derived from “narcissism”, which describes the character trait of self-love. In Greek mythology, Narcissus was a handsome Greek youth who rejected the desperate advances of the nymph Echo. As a punishment, he was doomed to fall in love with his own reflection in a pool of water. Unable to consummate his love, Narcissus pined away and changed into the flower that bears his name, the narcissus. In the text, the author implies that he has never been in love with the image he creates in the eye of others, because it is imposed upon him.) Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Questions Sentence Highlights

48 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Paragraphs 2 Questions: (1) In what way do people talk to the author? (They often talk to him in two ways: either converse with him at the top of their lungs, with careful enunciation of each word, or they whisper to each other, assuming that since his eyes do not work, his ears do not, either.) Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Questions Sentence Highlights

49 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Paragraphs 2 Questions: (2) Do you think that if the word “blind” uttered, the speaker’s retina will really detach? What is implied in the statement? (What the author assumes is certainly not true. If one is retina detaches, he will become blind at once. The mere utterance of the word itself can never cause such a heavy loss. There is no doubt that the author uses sarcasm to express his indignation.) Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Questions Sentence Highlights

50 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Paragraph 2 Questions: (3) Explain the sentence “Hi, Jane, we have got a 76 here” and point out the rhetorical device employed in it. (This sentence means that: We have got a disabled man here”. “76”is used here to refer to a handicapped person because of the regulations issued by the department of labor in The rhetorical device is metonymy. At the same time, it can be treated as euphemism as well.) Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Questions Sentence Highlights

51 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Paragraph 3-13 Questions: (1) What is the main idea of this part? (Because of his blindness, people think that he cannot talk, though they think that he can hear.) (2) What does “this point” refer to? (It refers to the sentence: on the other hand, others know that of course I can hear, but I believe that I cannot talk.) Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Questions Sentence Highlights

52 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Paragraph 3-13 Questions: (3) Please read the sentences in quotation marks, imitating the way the orderly and the elderly woman conversed with each other. (4) Do you think that the author’s complaint works? (No, it does not at all. The author became angry with them and told them that he did not need an interpreter. The orderly, ignoring his complaint and his ability, just mechanically interpreted what he said to the elderly woman. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Questions Sentence Highlights

53 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Paragraphs 14 Questions: (1) Point out the topic sentence of this paragraph. (the first sentence) (2) Although the author is qualifications included a cum laude degree from Harvard College, he was turned down by over forty law firms. What does this imply and what rhetorical device is employed? (A cum laude degree from Harvard College suggests that the author was best qualified to practice law, yet he was rejected time and again just because of his disability. It best exposes people’s prejudices against the disabled. Contrast is employed here.) Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Questions Sentence Highlights

54 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Paragraphs Questions: (1) Which is the word that indicates that the author’s narration of his disillusioning experiences comes to an end? (Fortunately) (2) Is the business community’s response to the regulations issued by the department of labor positive or negative? (Generally speaking, it is positive. Many are willing to offer the disabled equal employment opportunities.) Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Questions Sentence Highlights

55 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Paragraphs Questions: (3) What does the last sentence imply? (It implies that one should be judged according to his ability. Both dad and I played basketball badly, so the little friend asked:” which one is blind?” Similarly, if both a handicapped person and a non-handicapped person do their jobs equally well, the manager should judge them by the same standard.) Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Questions Sentence Highlights

56 Darkness at Noon Unit To date is has not been narcissistic. (Para. 1) Paraphrase: Up to now I have no fondness for the image I have created in the eye of others. 2. Very often people will converse with me at the top of their lungs, enunciating each word very carefully. (Para. 2) Paraphrase: Quite often people tend to talk with me at the top of their voices, pronouncing each word carefully and clearly. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Questions Sentence Highlights

57 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 3.I have concluded that the word “blind” is not used for one of two reasons: Either they fear that if the dread word is spoken, the ticket agent’s retina will immediately detach, or they are reluctant to inform me of my condition of which I may not have been previously aware. (Para. 2) Paraphrase: I have come to understand why the word “blind” is not used: Either they fear that if the terrible word is uttered, the ticket agent will immediately become blind, or they are not willing to let me know my condition about which I may not have hand the first idea. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Questions Sentence Highlights

58 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 4.This point was graphically driven home to me while we were in England. (Para.4) Paraphrase: This point was made completely clear to me during our stay in England. 5.This procedure continued for appomaximately five at which point even my saint-like disposition deserted me. (Para.1 2) Paraphrase: This whole set of questions, responses and repetitions lasted for about five minutes at which point I because very impatient in spite of my good temper. 6.By and large, the business community’s response to offering employment to the disabled has been enthusiastic. (Para. 15) Paraphrase: Generally speaking, companies and firms respond to the regulations of equal employment opportunities for the disabled in a positive way. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Questions Sentence Highlights

59 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Text Appreciation On a point by point basis and in a deductive method, the author of this narrative text exposes the social prejudices against the handicapped. He also expresses his indignation at those who are biased against the disabled to their ability and dignity. The language of the text is primarily characterized by a formal style, though some colloquial sentences are scattered here and there. Language Appreciation Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study

60 Darkness at Noon Unit Darkness at Noon (Title) Note the symbolic and metonymic meaning of the title. It is common sense that noontime should be broad daytime, so this estrangement of common sense aims to produce a special effect on the reader. The reader can infer different layers of meaning from it; for the author, it is darkness all the time no matter when; for the observer, he is blind to the author’s outstanding achievement and ability owing to his prejudice against the disabled. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Text Appreciation Language Appreciation

61 Darkness at Noon Unit The opening sentences in paragraphs These three opening sentences, with simple yet forceful language, outlining the whole text in an ascending order, expose the illogical foolishness of those who are biased against the disabled, and convey the author’s indignation at such practice. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Text Appreciation Language Appreciation

62 Darkness at Noon Unit A waiter or waitress will ask Kit if “ he would like a drink” to which I respond that” indeed he would” Note the cynical tone of the sentence. 4.The attempt to find employment, the continuous frustration of being told that it was impossible for a blind person to practice law, the rejection letters, not based on my lack of ability but rather on my disability, will always remain one of the most disallowing experiences of my life. Note the effect of the listing of the things the author has experienced. It emphasizes the frequent frustrations the author has met in his life. Also note the assonance device employed (between “ability” and “disability”. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Text Appreciation Language Appreciation

63 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Activity 1 Pair works Have the students work in pairs and ask each if they would like to have a disabled student in their dormitory and why? Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Activity 5

64 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Role-play. Two executives (a man and a woman) are trying to an ideal person for a new job in their company. The best two candidates have very similar qualifications for the job but one has a physical disability. The two company directors have different views on why the job should be given to one or the other and discuss their possible views. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Activity 5

65 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Oral activity: Language Support In an interview, interviews tend to ask questions, while interviews are expected to answer their questions. The following lowing questions may be asked in an interview to evaluate an applicant: Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Activity 5

66 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 (1) Communication and coordination ability What community activities have you ever got involved in? have you ever been an organizer? In organizing or attending such activities, what were your gains, and what were your losses? In retrospect, what should have been done to improve such activities? (2) Academic achievements Have you got a good ranking in your class/grade? What are your favorite subjects? Why? In what way can you apply your major to your applied job? Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Activity 5

67 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 (3) Career path development What kind career path have you designed for yourself? What preparations have you made so far for your career? (4) Strengths and weaknesses Would you please recommend to us your strengths? What are the areas you believe you should get improved in the future? Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Activity 5

68 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Oral activity: II on p.212 Information support In defending and challenging the idea on people with disabilities, the following information may be of some use: USA president Franklin Roosevelt (impaired movement as the result of polio) Classical composer Ludwig van Beethoven (deaf in later years) Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Activity 5

69 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Oral activity: II on p.212 King Richard III of England (childhood sickness allowed bones to malformed resulting in severe curvature of the back and extremely uneven legs) Civil rights activist Helen Keller (deaf and blind) Stephen Hawking (has motor neuron disease and uses a wheelchair and speech synthesizer) Christopher Reeve (USA actor famous for portraying Superman who became quadriplegic after a horse-riding accident) Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Activity 5

70 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Oral activity: II on p.212 Vocabulary support List of physical disabilities (1) Mobility impairment Clubfoot Paralysis Amputation Parkinson’s disease Cerebral palsy Arthritis Stroke (2) Visual impairment Blindness Low vision Color blindness Cataract (4) Hearing impairment Deafness tinnitus Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Activity 5

71 Darkness at Noon Unit 13 Report and discussion Step1: Divide the students into of four or five, then have each group report on one famous handicapped person in class. Step2: Have the students work in their group and discuss the problems that the disabled are faced with in China today and offer possible solutions to them. Section One: Cultural Information Section Three: Text Understanding Section Four: Text Appreciation Section Five: Activities Section Two: Word Study Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Activity 5


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