Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Bullies and Violence in Education Presented by: Cliff, Megan, Shawn, and Sarah ED 210-02.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Bullies and Violence in Education Presented by: Cliff, Megan, Shawn, and Sarah ED 210-02."— Presentation transcript:

1

2

3 Bullies and Violence in Education Presented by: Cliff, Megan, Shawn, and Sarah ED

4 Violent Schools – Safe Schools 1978 Office of Educational Research and Improvement Report to Congress. Office of Educational Research and Improvement Report to Congress. Initiated surveys to gauge violence in U.S. schools. Initiated surveys to gauge violence in U.S. schools. NSSC trying to determine causal factors since 1978 to present. NSSC trying to determine causal factors since 1978 to present.

5 Gun Free Schools Act 1994 All 50 states reported that from , they expelled a total of nearly 8000 students for bringing a firearm to school. All 50 states reported that from , they expelled a total of nearly 8000 students for bringing a firearm to school. 57 percent were in high school. 57 percent were in high school. 33 percent were in junior high. 33 percent were in junior high. 10 percent were in elementary school. 10 percent were in elementary school.

6 62 percent of the expulsions reported 62 percent of the expulsions reported were for bringing a handgun to school were for bringing a handgun to school 7 percent of the expulsions were for 7 percent of the expulsions were for bringing a rifle or shotgun to school bringing a rifle or shotgun to school 31 percent were for some other type of 31 percent were for some other type of firearm, such as BOMBS, HAND- firearm, such as BOMBS, HAND- GRENADES, or starter pistols. GRENADES, or starter pistols.

7 A Report to the United States Attorney General on Current and Future Rates of Juvenile Offending 1996 Trends in Juvenile Violence:

8 From 1985 to 1994, the rate of murder From 1985 to 1994, the rate of murder committed by teen-agers: committed by teen-agers: Increased 172% Increased 172% Rose sharply for both black and white male Rose sharply for both black and white male teenagers, but not for females. teenagers, but not for females. Guns, especially handguns, played a major Guns, especially handguns, played a major role in the surge of juvenile murder. Since role in the surge of juvenile murder. Since 1984, the number of juveniles killing with a 1984, the number of juveniles killing with a gun has quadrupled. gun has quadrupled.

9 Most significant finding of the Most significant finding of the report report Even if the PER-CAPITA RATE of teen homicide REMAINS THE SAME, the number of 14- to 17-year-olds who will commit murder should INCREASE to nearly 5,000 annually. Even if the PER-CAPITA RATE of teen homicide REMAINS THE SAME, the number of 14- to 17-year-olds who will commit murder should INCREASE to nearly 5,000 annually.

10 National Center for Education and Bureau of Justice Statistics In 1996–97, 10 percent of all public schools reported at least one serious violent crime to the police or a law enforcement representative. In 1996–97, 10 percent of all public schools reported at least one serious violent crime to the police or a law enforcement representative. During 1998, students aged 12 through 18 were victims of more than 2.7 million crimes at school, including about 253,000 serious violent crimes (rape, sexual assault, robbery and aggravated assault). During 1998, students aged 12 through 18 were victims of more than 2.7 million crimes at school, including about 253,000 serious violent crimes (rape, sexual assault, robbery and aggravated assault).

11 In 2000, students ages 12 through 18 were victims of about 1.9 million total crimes of violence or theft at school. In that same year, students in this age range were victims of about 128,000 serious violent crimes at school (i.e., rape, sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault). In 2000, students ages 12 through 18 were victims of about 1.9 million total crimes of violence or theft at school. In that same year, students in this age range were victims of about 128,000 serious violent crimes at school (i.e., rape, sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault). In 2001, 8 percent of students reported that they had been bullied at school in the last 6 months, up from 5 percent in In 2001, 8 percent of students reported that they had been bullied at school in the last 6 months, up from 5 percent in 1999.

12 Some scary stats for Teachers During the period, teachers were the victims of 1,755,000 crimes at school, including 1,087,000 thefts and 668,000 serious violent crimes. This amounts to 83 crimes per 1,000 teachers annually. During the period, teachers were the victims of 1,755,000 crimes at school, including 1,087,000 thefts and 668,000 serious violent crimes. This amounts to 83 crimes per 1,000 teachers annually.

13 Annually, over the 5-year period from 1998 to 2002, teachers were the victims of approximately 234,000 total nonfatal crimes at school, including 144,000 thefts and 90,000 violent crimes (rape, sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault). Annually, over the 5-year period from 1998 to 2002, teachers were the victims of approximately 234,000 total nonfatal crimes at school, including 144,000 thefts and 90,000 violent crimes (rape, sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault).

14 “Initiation Rites in American High Schools: A National Survey” By Alfred University 2000

15 Hazing is prevalent among American high school students. Hazing is prevalent among American high school students. 48 percent of students who belong to groups reported being subjected to hazing activities. 48 percent of students who belong to groups reported being subjected to hazing activities. 43 percent reported being subjected to humiliating activities. 43 percent reported being subjected to humiliating activities. 30 percent reported performing potentially illegal acts as part of their initiation. 30 percent reported performing potentially illegal acts as part of their initiation. Both female and male students report high levels of hazing, although male students are at highest risk, especially for dangerous hazing. Both female and male students report high levels of hazing, although male students are at highest risk, especially for dangerous hazing.

16 The lower a student’s grade point average the greater their risk of being hazed. The lower a student’s grade point average the greater their risk of being hazed. Even groups usually considered safe haze new members. For example, 24 percent of students involved in church groups were subjected to hazing activities. Even groups usually considered safe haze new members. For example, 24 percent of students involved in church groups were subjected to hazing activities. 71 percent of the students subjected to hazing reported negative consequences. 71 percent of the students subjected to hazing reported negative consequences. Getting into fights, hurting other people Getting into fights, hurting other people Fighting with parents Fighting with parents Feeling angry, confused, embarrassed or guilty Feeling angry, confused, embarrassed or guilty Doing poorly in school Doing poorly in school Having difficulty eating, sleeping, or concentrating Having difficulty eating, sleeping, or concentrating

17 36 percent of the students said that they would not report hazing primarily because “There’s no one to tell,” or “Adults won’t handle it right” (27 percent). 36 percent of the students said that they would not report hazing primarily because “There’s no one to tell,” or “Adults won’t handle it right” (27 percent). Students do not distinguish between “fun” and hazing. Students do not distinguish between “fun” and hazing. 14 percent said they were hazed 14 percent said they were hazed 48 percent said they participated in activities that are defined as hazing 48 percent said they participated in activities that are defined as hazing 29 percent said they did things that are potentially illegal in order to join a group. 29 percent said they did things that are potentially illegal in order to join a group.

18 Mental Effects Stress Stress Anxiety Depression Anxiety Depression Poor memory/concentration Poor memory/concentration Suicidal thoughts Suicidal thoughts

19 Physical Effects Decreased immune system Decreased immune system Aches and pains Aches and pains Increased blood pressure Increased blood pressure Decreased appetite Decreased appetite Suicide Suicide

20 Short Term Effects On the Bully Lack of close relationships Lack of close relationships Poor performance in school Poor performance in school Disliked by teachers Disliked by teachers

21 Short Term Effects On the Victim Stress Stress Hates school Hates school Hard time making friends Hard time making friends Depression Depression Physical Illness Physical Illness Suicide Suicide

22 Long Term Effects On the Bully More serious acts of aggression More serious acts of aggression Alcohol/Drug abuse Alcohol/Drug abuse Jail Jail

23 Long Term Effects On the Victim Anti-social behavior Anti-social behavior Low self-esteem Low self-esteem Suicide Suicide

24 Examples Columbine Erik Harris and Dylan Klebold 30 Bombs 30 Bombs 1 Teacher and 12 Students killed 1 Teacher and 12 Students killed

25 Examples “Sid” Physically and verbally attacked Physically and verbally attacked Fear of crowds and dogs Fear of crowds and dogs Antidepressants Antidepressants

26 What Should Schools Look For? Different forms of Bullying Direct Physical Bullying Direct Physical Bullying Direct verbal Bullying Direct verbal Bullying Indirect Bullying Indirect Bullying

27 Programs Outcome

28 School Bullying Prevention Programs School-Level Components School-Level Components Formation of Bullying Prevention Coordinating Committee Formation of Bullying Prevention Coordinating Committee Anonymous Student Questionnaire Anonymous Student Questionnaire Coordinating System of Supervision Coordinating System of Supervision Adoption of School-wide Rules Adoption of School-wide Rules Appropriate Positive and Negative Consequences Appropriate Positive and Negative Consequences Involve Parents Involve Parents Staff Discussion Groups Staff Discussion Groups

29 School Bullying Prevention Programs Classroom-Level Components Classroom-Level Components Reinforcement of School-wide rules Reinforcement of School-wide rules Classroom meetings with students Classroom meetings with students Informational meetings with Parents Informational meetings with Parents Individual-Level Components Individual-Level Components Interventions with Children who Bully Interventions with Children who Bully Interventions with Children who are Bullied Interventions with Children who are Bullied Discussions with parents of involved students Discussions with parents of involved students

30 Creation of Zero-tolerance for Bullying Treat People with Respect Treat People with Respect Setting High Expectations Setting High Expectations Teaching to Speak Up Teaching to Speak Up Report Bullying Report Bullying Recruiting Parents Recruiting Parents Looking for Patterns Looking for Patterns Distinction between tattling and telling Distinction between tattling and telling Guidance Counselor Awarness Guidance Counselor Awarness

31 OLWEUS Program Assertive Training Assertive Training Restorative Practices Restorative Practices Bystander Training Bystander Training Friendly Schools and Families Friendly Schools and Families YOU CAN DO IT! Education YOU CAN DO IT! Education

32 OLWEUS Program Assertive Training Assertive Training Requires Responding in a way that is respectful to themselves Requires Responding in a way that is respectful to themselves Plan and practice responses Plan and practice responses Assertive body language Assertive body language Restorative Practices Restorative Practices Creation of obligations and liabilities Creation of obligations and liabilities Focus on healing and making things right Focus on healing and making things right Problem-solving skills Problem-solving skills Support from community Support from community

33 OLWEUS Program Bystander Training Bystander Training Student: Student: Act with responsibility by challenging the bullying behavior Act with responsibility by challenging the bullying behavior Build the students skills Build the students skills “No Blame Policy” “No Blame Policy” Teachers: Teachers: Give reason for actions Give reason for actions Distinguish between dangerous and non-dangerous situations Distinguish between dangerous and non-dangerous situations Consider what forms of discouragement could be effective without inflaming situation Consider what forms of discouragement could be effective without inflaming situation Role-play Role-play Monitor class Monitor class

34 OLWEUS Program Friendly Schools and Families Friendly Schools and Families Open communication about bullying to the community Open communication about bullying to the community Encourage teachers Encourage teachers Modify playground environment Modify playground environment Teach social skills Teach social skills School Pride Campaigns School Pride Campaigns

35 OLWEUS Program Buddy System Buddy System Promote Friendship Promote Friendship Younger and Older Child Interaction Younger and Older Child Interaction

36 Overall Summary How to help the bullied How to help the bullied Find strategies to deal with problems Find strategies to deal with problems Instill Instill Self-worth Self-worth Self-esteem Self-esteem Self-confidence Self-confidence Build Build Self-image Self-image Defense mechanisms Defense mechanisms Relationships Relationships

37 Overall Summary Implementation Implementation No tolerance policies No tolerance policies Consistent use of effective consequences Consistent use of effective consequences Try to build home/family connections Try to build home/family connections Assist in consistency of consequences Assist in consistency of consequences Counseling Counseling Professional Professional

38 Overall Summary Intervention and Prevention - Educators Intervention and Prevention - Educators Sit with the bully in a one-on-one situation Sit with the bully in a one-on-one situation Find out where the behavior stems from Find out where the behavior stems from Family problems, lack of social skills, psychiatric disorder Family problems, lack of social skills, psychiatric disorder Teach cooperative skills Teach cooperative skills Anger management, empathy, responsibility and accountability Anger management, empathy, responsibility and accountability Hold accountable for actions Hold accountable for actions State what they did State what they did How it should have been handled How it should have been handled What will they do next time What will they do next time The bully thinks it’s okay to be abusive, needs to be taught otherwise The bully thinks it’s okay to be abusive, needs to be taught otherwise

39 Overall Summary Continued… Continued… Personality Personality Shattered self-confidence and self-esteem, low self-image, loss of self-worth and self-love Shattered self-confidence and self-esteem, low self-image, loss of self-worth and self-love Results in strong feelings of fear, shame, embarrassment, and guilt Results in strong feelings of fear, shame, embarrassment, and guilt These feelings are encouraged by the bully to keep their target quiet These feelings are encouraged by the bully to keep their target quiet

40 Overall Summary Continued… Continued… Poor memory/concentration Poor memory/concentration Cognitive Cognitive Making mistakes, having accidents, forgetfulness, decreased efficiency and productivity in schoolwork and school activities Making mistakes, having accidents, forgetfulness, decreased efficiency and productivity in schoolwork and school activities Suicidal Suicidal Internalize anger rather than expressing it outwardly Internalize anger rather than expressing it outwardly Focuses the anger onto themselves and self-harms Focuses the anger onto themselves and self-harms

41 Overall Summary Effects of Bullying Effects of Bullying Stress or Distress Stress or Distress Diminishes the quality of life (mental) Diminishes the quality of life (mental) Plays havoc with the body’s immune system (physical) Plays havoc with the body’s immune system (physical) Reduced immunity to infection leading to frequent colds, coughs, flu, aches, pains, high blood pressure, headaches, etc. Reduced immunity to infection leading to frequent colds, coughs, flu, aches, pains, high blood pressure, headaches, etc. Anxiety Depression Anxiety Depression Vicious cycle Vicious cycle The loneliness, sadness, hopelessness of depression can cause fear and anxiety. This fear and anxiety may cause exhaustion and deeper feelings of depression. The loneliness, sadness, hopelessness of depression can cause fear and anxiety. This fear and anxiety may cause exhaustion and deeper feelings of depression. Panic attacks, extreme fear and dread of situations, avoidance of situations Panic attacks, extreme fear and dread of situations, avoidance of situations

42 Overall Summary Effects of Bullying Effects of Bullying Mental Mental Physical Physical Short term Short term On both bully and victim On both bully and victim Long term Long term On both bully and victim On both bully and victim

43 Overall Summary Why do bullies bully? Why do bullies bully? Usually they have been bullied Usually they have been bullied Physical/Mental abuse Physical/Mental abuse Neglect Neglect Very poor role modeling Very poor role modeling

44 Overall Summary Bullies Bullies Characteristically seen as physically powerful or dominant Characteristically seen as physically powerful or dominant Victims Victims Someone viewed as powerless and not retaliatory Someone viewed as powerless and not retaliatory

45 Overall Summary Actions of Bullying Actions of Bullying Direct Actions Direct Actions Verbal or physical contact, facial or other body gestures Verbal or physical contact, facial or other body gestures Indirect Actions Indirect Actions Intentional exclusion or refusal to comply with another person’s wishes Intentional exclusion or refusal to comply with another person’s wishes

46 Overall Summary Bullying Bullying The repeated and ongoing negative action toward one or more students. The repeated and ongoing negative action toward one or more students. The act of constant aggression toward another individual who lacks the same power. The act of constant aggression toward another individual who lacks the same power.

47 Sticks and stones may break your bones … but words will ALWAYS hurt you

48 Web Sources Information Resources archives/shouldschools.htm Video Resources


Download ppt "Bullies and Violence in Education Presented by: Cliff, Megan, Shawn, and Sarah ED 210-02."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google