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Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Biography  Romantic Movement in England  Best known poems are The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan  Born 1772 in.

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Presentation on theme: "Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Biography  Romantic Movement in England  Best known poems are The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan  Born 1772 in."— Presentation transcript:

1 Samuel Taylor Coleridge

2 Biography  Romantic Movement in England  Best known poems are The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan  Born 1772 in England  Bipolar  Opium  His life spiraled downward  Dr. Daniel in 1814  Lived with Gillman family until his death  Died 1834

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4 In Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree : Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea. That with music loud and long, I would build that dome in air, That sunny dome ! those caves of ice! And all who heard should see them there, And all should cry, Beware ! Beware ! His flashing eyes, his floating hair ! Weave a circle round him thrice, And close your eyes with holy dread, For he on honey-dew hath fed, And drunk the milk of Paradise. Kubla Khan Summary: A Chinese emperor named Kubla Khan.

5 Unchanged within, to see all changed without, Is a blank lot and hard to bear, no doubt. Yet why at others' Wanings should'st thou fret ? Then only might'st thou feel a just regret, Hadst thou withheld thy love or hid thy light In selfish forethought of neglect and slight. O wiselier then, from feeble yearnings freed, While, and on whom, thou may'st--shine on ! nor heed Whether the object by reflected light Return thy radiance or absorb it quite : And tho' thou notest from thy safe recess Old Friends burn dim, like lamps in noisome air, Love them for what they are ; nor love them less, Because to thee they are not what they were. Friends will leave; so you have to care for them, but not as much as you care for yourself Duty surviving Self-Love THE ONLY SURE FRIEND OF DECLINING LIFEA SOLILOQUY

6 Ere the birth of my life, if I wished it or no No question was asked me--it could not be so ! If the life was the question, a thing sent to try And to live on be YES; what can NO be ? to die. NATURE'S ANSWER Is't returned, as 'twas sent ? Is't no worse for the wear ? Think first, what you ARE ! Call to mind what you WERE ! I gave you innocence, I gave you hope, Gave health, and genius, and an ample scope, Return you me guilt, lethargy, despair ? Make out the invent'ry ; inspect, compare ! Then die--if die you dare ! We picked this one because it was easy to understand and it was a concept that even now no one has grasped.

7 Frost at Midnight Sea, hill, and wood, This populous village ! Sea, and hill, and wood, With all the numberless goings-on of life, Inaudible as dreams ! the thin blue flame Lies on my low-burnt fire, and quivers not ; Only that film, which fluttered on the grate, Still flutters there, the sole unquiet thing. Methinks, its motion in this hush of nature Gives it dim sympathies with me who live, Making it a companionable form, Lines 10- 23 Therefore all seasons shall be sweet to thee, Whether the summer clothe the general earth With greenness, or the redbreast sit and sing Betwixt the tufts of snow on the bare branch Of mossy apple-tree, while the nigh thatch Smokes in the sun-thaw ; whether the eave- drops fall Heard only in the trances of the blast, Or if the secret ministry of frost Shall hang them up in silent icicles, Quietly shining to the quiet Moon.

8 In Köhln, a town of monks and bones, And pavements fang'd with murderous stones And rags, and hags, and hideous wenches ; I counted two and seventy stenches, All well defined, and several stinks ! Ye Nymphs that reign o'er sewers and sinks, The river Rhine, it is well known, Doth wash your city of Cologne ; But tell me, Nymphs, what power divine Shall henceforth wash the river Rhine? We think that this poem is about government and people in power covering things up Question: In your opinion, what is the poem, Cologne, about?

9 Well, they are gone, and here must I remain, This lime-tree bower my prison ! I have lost Beauties and feelings, such as would have been Most sweet to my remembrance even when age Had dimm'd mine eyes to blindness ! They, meanwhile, Friends, whom I never more may meet again, On springy heath, along the hill-top edge, Wander in gladness, and wind down, perchance, To that still roaring dell, of which I told ; The roaring dell, o'erwooded, narrow, deep, And only speckled by the mid-day sun ; Where its slim trunk the ash from rock to rock Flings arching like a bridge ;--that branchless ash, Unsunn'd and damp, whose few poor yellow leaves Ne'er tremble in the gale, yet tremble still, Fann'd by the water-fall ! and there my friends Behold the dark green file of long lank weeds, That all at once (a most fantastic sight !) Still nod and drip beneath the dripping edge Of the blue clay-stone. This poem is about fear of growing old. The poem was a letter to his friend. This Lime-Tree Bower my Prison

10 Surplus of Nature's dread activity, Which, as she gazed on some nigh-finished vase, Retreating slow, with meditative pause, She formed with restless hands unconsciously. Blank accident ! nothing's anomaly ! If rootless thus, thus substanceless thy state, Go, weigh thy dreams, and be thy hopes, thy fears, The counter-weights !--Thy laughter and thy tears Mean but themselves, each fittest to create And to repay the other ! Why rejoices Thy heart with hollow joy for hollow good ? Why cowl thy face beneath the mourner's hood ? Why waste thy sighs, and thy lamenting voices, Image of Image, Ghost of Ghostly Elf, That such a thing as thou feel'st warm or cold ? Yet what and whence thy gain, if thou withhold These costless shadows of thy shadowy self ? Be sad ! be glad ! be neither ! seek, or shun ! Thou hast no reason why ! Thou canst have none ; Thy being's being is contradiction. Human Life We think this about not bothering to blame nature for human mistakes Question: A ‘Surplus of Nature’s dread activity’ what do you suppose he was talking about?

11 Where true Love burns Desire is Love's pure flame; It is the reflex of our earthly frame, That takes its meaning from the nobler part, And but translates the language of the heart. We liked this poem because it is one of the few love poems Coleridge ever wrote

12 I) Why did Coleridge start taking Opium? Therefore all seasons shall be sweet to thee, Whether the summer clothe the general earth With greenness, or the redbreast sit and sing Betwixt the tufts of snow on the bare branch Of mossy apple-tree, while the nigh thatch Smokes in the sun-thaw ; whether the eave-drops fall Heard only in the trances of the blast, Or if the secret ministry of frost Shall hang them up in silent icicles, Quietly shining to the quiet Moon. Besides being about his love for nature, what could the second part of Frost at Midnight represent? Frost at Midnight What does the word ‘betwixt’ mean?

13 That with music loud and long, I would build that dome in air, That sunny dome ! those caves of ice! And all who heard should see them there, And all should cry, Beware ! Beware ! His flashing eyes, his floating hair ! Weave a circle round him thrice, And close your eyes with holy dread, For he on honey-dew hath fed, And drunk the milk of Paradise. What is the rhyming scheme? Kubla Khan Who is the


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