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The LiteracyAccess Online Story by Rob Parrott, Marcella Simon, Peter Huffer, Steve Arrington, Karen Raffel, Lisa J. Stedge George Mason University Spring.

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Presentation on theme: "The LiteracyAccess Online Story by Rob Parrott, Marcella Simon, Peter Huffer, Steve Arrington, Karen Raffel, Lisa J. Stedge George Mason University Spring."— Presentation transcript:

1 The LiteracyAccess Online Story by Rob Parrott, Marcella Simon, Peter Huffer, Steve Arrington, Karen Raffel, Lisa J. Stedge George Mason University Spring 2003

2 Contact Us | Site Index | Logout Search:

3 Once upon a time, in the faraway kingdom of Literacy, there lived a girl, Gertrude, and her mother. Gertrude had the dream of learning to read. Gertrude’s mother had heard legends of a magical castle in the faraway land of Cyberspace, built by a clever band of wizards, where children learned to read, helped by teachers and parents, and other kind adults.

4 So Gertrude and her mother set off in search of the magical castle. They first received the blessing and protection of Sir Michael of Behrmann, a Knight of the Order of Immersion, who told them to seek out the wisdom of those who have gone on the journey before. And so they set out on their quest.

5 Performance Analysis - PURPOSE The purpose of our performance analysis is to address gaps in accessibility, usability, and functionality on the LAO site and make recommendations as to future steps in the research and design process.

6 PA - METHOD The design team conducted interviews with clients and stakeholders, members of the intended audience, accessibility specialists, and past participants in the development process. The team conducted a site analysis to: 1)pinpoint problems with the main features, Read from the Web, and StoryBuilder 2) consider accessibility issues

7 PA - FOCUS ON ISSUES The data collection indicated several possible areas for improvement, which included the following:  Accessibility (i.e., Section 508 compliance)  Availability of pre- and post- reading skills assessment tools  Functionality (i.e., navigation and usability)

8 PA - ACCESSIBILITY ISSUES Our preliminary findings revealed that the past phases of LAO addressed the issue of accessibility and Section 508 compliance in the following ways:  Most images are labeled with ALT tags  A skip navigation link is available on all pages  Keyboard navigation is possible  Image map links are replicated as text-only links

9 PA - ACCESSIBILITY ISSUES Areas for Further Focus:  Consistency/Accuracy of alt descriptions  Read from the Web (frames, images missing alt descriptions)  StoryBuilder (uses JavaScript)  Navigation bar (size of text, level of contrast in colors)

10 PA - ASSESSMENT ISSUES LAO is funded in part by grants from the United States Department of Education No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 means there must be greater accountability; science-based research to support further federal funding So,…. We need to include some method of qualitative testing

11 PA - ASSESSMENT ISSUES Inclusion of assessment features is predicated on four criteria:  Availability of online assessment resources  Affordability  Validity of the test  Compatibility with our site infrastructure

12 PA - FUNCTIONALITY ISSUES Site Entry  Splash page tour does not allow for flexibility of options  No mention of StoryBuilder feature on tour Registration and Login  “Group” classification could be confusing for a facilitator working with one child  Explanations of classifications and need for personal information are unclear

13 PA - FUNCTIONALITY ISSUES Access to StoryBuilder and Read from the Web  StoryBuilder is not visible on first tier navigation or called by the name “StoryBuilder” Usability of StoryBuilder  Difficult to submit pages or view a complete story Usability of Read from the Web  Difficult to read instructions while using feature

14 PA - CONCLUSIONS Need to remember that this robust site is the result of the hard work of previous teams Need to collect more information (usability testing) regarding main features Need to investigate further how to incorporate assessment features into the site Need to targetedly redesign specific areas of the site based on usability results

15 One day, they met a group of wise men and women on the road who told them of a castle of wonders. They gave Gertrude a present, a magic mirror where she might see the children and adults within the castle and learn from their trials and triumphs as they journeyed its hallways and learned to read within its walls.

16 “You will be given three challenges,” the wise people told Gertrude. “When you have completed these challenges, all the knowledge and wisdom of the castle are yours.”

17 Purpose To “identify and rectify” usability deficiencies on the LiteracyAccess Online site Who did we test? Test subjects who approximated our personas Dyads Single-users Usability Testing

18 Are end users able to successfully register to use the site in less than five minutes? Are end users able to successfully navigate from the post-log-in screen to the initial StoryBuilder screen in a minimum of three clicks of the mouse? Are end users able to successfully navigate from the post-log-in screen to the initial Read from the Web screen in a minimum of two clicks of the mouse? Do end users take the entire site tour? Usability Testing

19 Can end users of StoryBuilder create and publish a three-page story with an imported picture in less than ten minutes? Can end users of the Read from the Web use the feature to navigate to web pages? Do end users find the reading strategies useful? What are the barriers to successful completion of assigned tasks?

20 StoryBuilder: Difficult to find (26 clicks!) Read from the Web: BrowseAloud download not available from these pages Login/Registration: Only 50% completed correctly Site Tour: All users were forced to take this Usability Testing – Results

21 Login/Registration Site Tour StoryBuilder Read from the Web Additional Findings Usability Testing – Recommendations

22 After many days of journeying, Gertrude and her mother approached the castle gates. There were three tall gates of iron and a long drawbridge leading up to the castle. “However shall we enter,” cried Gertrude! “Remember the words of the wise people, my daughter,” counseled her mother. “This must be your first challenge, to discover the password that will open the one true gate, so that we may reach the castle.” Gertrude thought long and hard. “Literacy” she whispered, and one true gate swung open for them to enter...

23 OLD

24 OLD

25 Old Home Page Old Splash Page Combine and Redesign New Home Page

26 Search: Contact Us | Site Index Parent and Child Use StoryBuilder Sign-InCancel Username Password Login LiteracyAccess Online provides reading activities and resources for readers and helpers including: guest StoryBuilder, where you can create stories, write reports, and save your work in your own account. Read from the Web, where you can hear language read out loud using a free download of BrowseAloud software and follow along, using our helpful tips and prompts. Online reading assessments now available! Register for Free | Enter as a Guest Read about the benefits of registration. LiteracyAccess Online | Literacy Explorer | Facilitator Support | Communication | Explore Accessibility {back to top} Need help? Take our site tour or use our friendly help feature seated on the books above. NEW

27 We’re glad to have you as our guest. To find your way around the site, simply click where you would like to go on the main “stack of books” menu bar above. We encourage you to register for free on the site. Read about the benefits of registration. If you need help at any time, feel free to take our site tour or use our friendly help feature. Contact Us | Site Index | Logout Search: Reader Story Guest McFeeglebee LiteracyAccess Online | Literacy Explorer | Facilitator Support | Communication | Explore Accessibility {back to top} NEW

28 Old Registration Process (9 steps) OLD

29 Create Reader Record Welcome & Confirmation (4 steps) Create Group Create Reader Record Welcome & Confirmation (5 steps) INDIVIDUAL GROUP Basic I.D. Info. Create User Profile Set Reader Account NEW

30 Contact Us | Site Index | Logout Search: Basic Information for Identification Purposes Note: All information is required, except “School Name.” Facilitator Type: First Name: Last Name: City: State: Zip Code: Phone Number: School Name: ContinueReset Select Type Select State Type Your School Name Here LiteracyAccess Online | Literacy Explorer | Facilitator Support | Communication | Explore Accessibility {back to top} NEW

31 Contact Us | Site Index | Logout Search: LiteracyAccess Online | Literacy Explorer | Facilitator Support | Communication | Explore Accessibility {back to top} Welcome Back, Andrew! Now you’re ready to work with Cynthia. Use the bar below to view your reader’s Portfolio or to update your current story name. If you need help at any time, feel free to take our site tour or use our friendly help feature. Reader Story Cynthia McFeeglebee NEW

32 Contact Us | Site Index | Logout Search: LiteracyAccess Online | Literacy Explorer | Facilitator Support | Communication | Explore Accessibility {back to top} Welcome Back, Andrew! Now you’re ready to work with Cynthia. To choose or add readers or groups, please visit the bar below. If you need help at any time, feel free to take our site tour or use our friendly help feature. GroupStory Phonics McFeeglebee Reader CynthiaNEW

33 Literacy Explorer StoryBuilderPre- Reading Read from the Story Bank Post- Reading Read from the Web Read from Your Story Bank Redesign NEW

34 OLD

35 OLD

36 Combine & Redesign

37 Literacy Explorer is a reading system designed to lead the reader and reading facilitator through a reading session. Literacy Explorer involves three steps – pre-reading, reading, and post-reading. We provide strategies, activities, resources and tips for each one of these steps. Literacy Explorer contains three reading activities designed to motivate readers by providing them with stimulating content at their reading level and in their areas of interest. StoryBuilder allows you to create a story, report, or essay using material from the World Wide Web or your own words. You can insert images and pictures in your story. Registered users can save their stories in your Story Bank to be read later and even publish their stories on the LAO site. Read from the Web provides you with the opportunity to choose material on the World Wide Web and read it together, using the tips, resources, and strategies shown on the page. If you download the free screen reader, BrowseAloud, you can listen to word pronunciation while you read. Read from the Bank allows you to choose a age level appropriate story from the Story Bank, either those we have provided or those you have created in StoryBuilder. Contact Us | Site Index | Logout Search: LiteracyAccess Online | Literacy Explorer | Facilitator Support | Communication | Explore Accessibility {back to top} NEW

38 OLD

39 Which of the following describes you? How did you learn about our site? SendReset Enter your message here, including any questions, concerns, comments, or suggestions: If you would like a response to your message… Enter Your Name: Enter Your Address: Select One Site Administrator: Seunghun Ok at Helen A. Kellar Institute for Human disAbilities at George Mason University: 4400 University Drive, MS 1F2; Fairfax, Virginia Phone/TDD: ; Fax: Select One Contact Us | Site Index | Logout Search: LiteracyAccess Online | Literacy Explorer | Facilitator Support | Communication | Explore Accessibility {back to top} NEW

40 Thanks for getting in touch with us. We hope to see you again in the near future. LiteracyAccess Online | Literacy Explorer | Facilitator Support | Communication | Explore Accessibility Contact Us | Site Index | Logout Search: NEW

41 The castle hall was enormous, with hallways and passageways leading in every direction. How will we ever find our way to the knowledge and wisdom within, wondered Gertrude, without a guide to show us the way? Out of nowhere, a castle sprite appeared.. “Do not be frightened,” she said in a soothing voice, “I am here to help you on your quest.” She pointed them to the correct passage...

42 A “band-aid” solution Based on the vision and mission of the Phase 6 team to highlight StoryBuilder and Read from the Web – a greater emphasis was placed on the functionality of the site, rather than the navigation Based on usability testing, certain problem areas were identified, which led to the decision to add contextual help at the moment of need Based on usability testing, it was clear that the Frequently Asked Questions did not fulfill the role of help Help

43 Old Help Menu: Old Help: Frequently Asked Questions = Site Help Organization tied to navigation Actual available “help” not accessible through this menu Help: OLD

44 Frequently Asked Questions a subcategory within Help Organization tied to functionality – what the user is trying to do All contextual help available through the main help menu Contextual help highlighted within appropriate pages using an icon Help separated out into smaller chunks Help NEW

45 Help – Contextual NEW

46 NEW

47 NEW

48 Site Tour Based on Usability Testing: Should not be part of site entry flow Should not contain the site navigation without any active links Less text, more screenshots Focus on what the site does, not the navigation Usefulness to be determined…

49 Site TourOLD

50 NEW

51 NEW

52 Inside the passage, Gertrude and her mother were stopped by a fearsome gargoyle. “Halt,” he bellowed. “You must take the test that we give all who enter and all who leave. How else can I proclaim throughout the kingdom that our magic truly works?” “I will take your test,” Gertrude said fearlessly, “if you will help me on my quest.” “You have passed your second challenge,” announced the Gargoyle.

53 Motivation for Assessment Feature

54 Online Reading Assessment

55 Process Flows

56 Introductory Page

57 Data Storage Agreement

58 Data Entry

59

60 Redesigned Menu Bar

61 Contact Us | Site Index | Logout Search: LiteracyAccess Online | Literacy Explorer | Facilitator Support | Communication | Explore Accessibility {back to top} Reader Story Cynthia McFeeglebee Welcome Back, Andrew! NEW REMINDER: We noticed it’s been 5 months since the last time your reader, Cynthia, took a reading assessment test. If you think Cynthia is ready to try taking a test, again, all you have to do is go to the testing section. Now you’re ready to work with Cynthia. Use the bar below to view your reader’s Portfolio or to update your current story name. If you need help at any time, feel free to take our site tour or use our friendly help feature. Testing Contact Us | Site Index | Logout Search:

62 “You have yet one more challenge to complete,” the gargoyle told Gertrude. “You must go into the great room of Web and find the one true tome among the multitudes. This will contain the tale that you shall read with your mother, with the help of our magical tips and tricks.”

63 Read from the Web RFTW is designed to allow learners and their facilitators (dyads) select reading material from the World Wide Web that is interesting to them A framed screen lets the facilitator and the learner refer to reading strategy help while they read online

64

65 OLD

66 Old Site Design Issues Upper-frame menu changes with every click Too many features squeezed into small upper- frame space Some features, when activated, kick users off their website Difficult to relocate Web search option Hard to tell which upper-frame feature is selected

67 OLD

68 "Why are user interfaces so lousy? The easy answer: Doing it right is hard." Fredric Paul, Putting A Bad Interface On Things,

69 Usability Testing - Method Targeted four local SMEs with knowledge of reading and/or learning disabilities Focused on areas of confusion, what would be most helpful to a facilitator and learner dyad using the tool, and which features were the least important Collected Kirkpatrick’s Level 1 and 2 feedback

70 Usability Testing - Results Areas considered confusing before were confirmed as confusing through this testing:  Changing upper frame menu  Some features kicked users off their website  Too many features  Some features would “never” be used (too complicated)  Difficult to relocate Web search option

71 Usability Testing - Results: Search the Web Listen to the Word Resources Tips for Motivation Summarize the story Dictionary Rewrite the ending of the story StoryBuilder Write your own story “What to search for ”

72 Usability Testing - Results Other interesting things that came from testing were  Some features are not clear (Reading Keys)  Other “kid-friendly” search engines (Yahooligans)  Suggested, useful Web activities (www.puzzlemaker.com)

73 Usability Testing - Results Other interesting things that came from testing were  Listen to the Word function mispronounced words  Some strategies do not fit with Web reading content (story vs. non-fiction)

74 Redesign Ideas Keep some of the main design concepts while instituting upper-frame consistency Remove less popular upper-frame features Remove lower-frame design obstacles (after introduction page)

75 Redesign Ideas Provide menu options for more popular features, like Web search Highlight upper-frame features when selected

76 OLD

77 NEW

78 NEW

79 Next Steps for Read from the Web More dyad testing needed – does this new layout work? Reevaluation of learning strategies by SME  Reflecting current trends and research?  Content appropriateness (fiction vs. non- fiction)?

80 Next Steps for Read from the Web Let graphic designer clean up visual consistency with rest of site Offering better options through newer technologies

81 When Gertrude emerged triumphantly with a large dusty book in her arms, the Gargoyle told her “your challenge is not yet complete. Take this quill and ink. You must write your own tales to read with your mother. Then and only then, will the castle’s knowledge and wisdom be yours.” And so they wrote a tale together, full of adventure and romance, and filled it with illustrations they found in the great room of Web.

82 StoryBuilder No way to preview or edit stories, only read and delete Only nine stories available for users to read Non-central location of stories and story building functions OLD

83 Story creation process complicated, lengthy and confusing Important help located out of users’ view StoryBuilder OLD

84 StoryBuilder Builder now in familiar, compact window Story creation done in step by step manner (title page, content) NEW “Help” is contextualized and incorporated into story building process. While in the creation process, stories can be previewed at any point.

85 StoryBuilder NEW The Story Editor can be opened either from the Story Bank or while previewing a story.

86 StoryBuilder NEW User-created stories can be contributed to the site for use by all Centralized Story Bank with full editing functions

87 StoryBuilder NEW User-created stories can be contributed to the site for use by all

88 Prototype Demo Enough talking – let’s see it!

89 Final Recommendations Complete development and go live! Make content less text-heavy More just-in-time, contextual help Review site for grammatical errors Review content for reading theory accuracy Revise site for Section 508 compliance Change all “student” references to “reader”

90 Final Recommendations Re-evaluate purpose for student login Place “Benefits of Registration” in activity areas Account management feature for facilitators Shift the focus of the site to user-driven Marketing plan Usability testing for new/neglected areas: Discussion Board New Read from the Web New Site Tour New StoryBuilder

91 Gertrude and her mother returned home and Sir Michael of Behrmann threw them a great banquet and invited all the children of the kingdom to learn of their adventures so that they too may visit the castle and learn how to read. Gertrude and her mother visited the castle many times after that and created many tales together, which they shared with their fellow travelers far and wide. And they lived happily ever after.

92 Special Thanks to… Mike Behrmann, Ph.D. Liz DelSandro Seunghun Ok Cherie Takemoto & PEATC Brenda Bannan-Ritland, Ph.D. Kevin Clark, Ph.D. Brenda Mueller GMU Graduate School of Education


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