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Aim To investigate if the services provided at one mental health outpatient clinic, gives its’ clients the capacity to promote their own mental health.

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Presentation on theme: "Aim To investigate if the services provided at one mental health outpatient clinic, gives its’ clients the capacity to promote their own mental health."— Presentation transcript:

1 Aim To investigate if the services provided at one mental health outpatient clinic, gives its’ clients the capacity to promote their own mental health. Objectives Do outpatient services enable their users to manage the social and economic factors that have an effect on both their mental and physical health? Do the services provided meet actual client need? Are the services provided promoting to overall health? Background “Health is a basic human right and is essential for social and economic development” (W.H.O. 1997). Mental ill- health is estimated to cost the Irish economy 11 billion annually (I.D.O.H.C. 2006) and, services are often budget led (Beresford and Croft 2001). People who attend psychiatric services want recovery, not the stability currently offered (Perese 2007). Those with mental ill-health diagnoses often report immense social and personal deprivation (Pinfold et al 2005). The ability to effect full power over ones’ life is essential to mental health (Cook and Jonikas 2002). Outpatient clinics are an effective way of delivering care (I.D.O.H.C. 2006). The evaluation of patient satisfaction is now a vital part of care delivery and is considered a good indicator of care standards (Zhang et al 2007). A recent study commissioned by the Mental Health Commission examined users’ experiences of services with a qualitative approach (Dunne 2006). The University of Limerick has been commissioned to research the function of Community Mental Health Teams nationally and, will utilise both quantitative and qualitative methods in their research (De Burca et al 2007). This pilot study bridges a gap between these two national research initiatives. It investigates a particular service from a quantitative viewpoint but, on a micro level. Methodology This pilot study was quantitative in nature. The sample was a convenience purposive sample. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that while people who use mental health services do feel that the service that they receive is adequate, there are changes that they would like to see in the provision of those services. People who experience mental ill-health are amongst the most marginalised groups in modern society. Any well designed and executed research, that has the potential to positively influence the circumstances of those who experience mental ill-health is worthwhile. As a result of this pilot study, this research is now being instigated on a larger scale. References Beresford, P. and Croft (2001) “Service Users’ Knowledges and the Social Construction of Social Work”, Journal of Social Work, 1(3), Cook, J.A. and Jonikas, J.A. (2002) “Self-Determination Among Mental Health Consumers/Survivors: Using Lessons From the Past to Guide the Future”, Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 13(2), De Burca, S., Flood, P., Armstrong, C., McCurtain, S. and Saunders, J. (2007) “Community Mental Health Teams: Determinants of Effectiveness”, Working Paper WP Dunne, E. A. (2006) The Views of Adult Users of the Public Sector Mental Health Services, Dublin; Mental Health Commission. Ireland Department of Health and Children (2006) A Vision for Change, Report of the Expert Group on Mental Health Policy, Dublin; The Stationary Office. Perese, E.F. (2007) “Stigma, Poverty, and Victimization: Roadblocks to Recovery for Individuals With Severe Mental Illness”, Journal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association, 13(5), Pinfold, V., Byrne, P. And Toulmin, H. (2005) “Challenging Stigma and Discrimination in communities: A Focus Group study Identifying UK Mental Health Service Users’ Main Campaign Priorities”, International Journal of Social Psychiatry, 51(2), World Health Organisation (1997) Jakarta Declaration on Leading Health into the 21 st Century [online], available: [accessed 23 September 2007]. Zhang, Y., Rohrer, J., Borders, T. And Farrell, T. (2007) “Patient Satisfaction, Self-Rated Health Status, and Health Confidence: An Assessment of the Utility of Single-Item Questions”, American Journal of Medical Quality, 22(1), Further details Kay Hickey H. Dip. Health Promotion and Education, Community Mental Health Nurse, North Lee Mental Health Services, Health Service Executive- Southern Area Are Outpatient Mental Health Services Helping People to Recover? A Pilot Study. Mary (Kay) Hickey; H. Dip Health Promotion and Education; Community Mental Health Nurse, North Lee Mental Health Services, Cork. Results Call for services that addresses need A variety of treatment options available Treatment choice Request for independent advocacy Stigma is a barrier to service access A need to develop close personal relationships Involvement in meaningful activity Out of hours service Need for more information and advise Concerns re confidentiality Gender difference in view of recovery Results Mental Health Service Providers are constantly being scrutinised as to whether they actually promote the health of those who utilise their services. This research pilot study analyses this issue in one mental health outpatient clinic. This research essentially studies health promotion in the mentally unwell, through its focus on the determinants of health.


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