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Outdoor Heat Exposure WAC 296-62-095 (effective July 2008) Division of Occupational Safety & Health Washington State Department of Labor and Industries.

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Presentation on theme: "Outdoor Heat Exposure WAC 296-62-095 (effective July 2008) Division of Occupational Safety & Health Washington State Department of Labor and Industries."— Presentation transcript:

1 Outdoor Heat Exposure WAC (effective July 2008) Division of Occupational Safety & Health Washington State Department of Labor and Industries and South Bay Fire District 8 June 2008 Rev July 2008

2 Training for Supervisors

3 As supervisors, YOU are representing the employer and have the responsibility of taking care of the health and safety of the employees (volunteers).

4 As the employer, we will provide you with information to assist you with this responsibility by providing you training on:  Employee training topics  Procedures to follow for implementing the standard  Procedures to follow if a member reports with signs/symptoms of heat related illness, including accessing EMS  Procedures for moving to an accessible location, if necessary

5 Conditions for applying heat related illness rules: –from May 1 through September 30 (but the general duty clause applies the rest of the year) –for more than 15 minutes in a 60 minute period –when temperature reaches “Action Levels” below Non-breathing clothes including vapor barrier clothing or PPE such as chemical resistant suits (includes bunkers) 52 degrees F Double-layer woven clothes including coveralls, jackets and sweatshirts (Note: also regular rain gear) 77 degrees F All other clothing89 degrees F * L and I considers volunteers employees for the purposes of this standard

6 When the aforementioned conditions apply, employers must: –Make drinking water or other acceptable beverages (OAB) readily accessible –Conduct training prior to working in outdoor heat; initial training then annually Supervisors are required to have the basic employee training PLUS additional supervisor training –Add a section to their written Safety and Accident Prevention Program –Encourage employees to frequently consume water (OAB) –Respond to signs and symptoms of heat related illness

7 As supervisors you are responsible for: –Maintaining an awareness of environmental conditions – both the ambient temperature and the length of time of the event (incident, training, any outdoor work activity) –Ensuring water or OAB are readily accessible at all times –Ensuring members have the opportunity to drink at least 1 qt of drinking water (OAB) per hour –Recognizing and taking action when members exhibit signs and symptoms of heat related illness

8 Members – must know (and heed) their limitations! Case Studies – USFA Emergency Incident Rehab, Commonalities: Age Training exercises Peer Pressure

9 Supervisors – must be aware of the condition of your team! Case Studies – USFA Emergency Incident Rehab, Factors relating to the deaths : “Rest Breaks as needed” “Report to rehab “ Failure to recognize problems of heat stress Not knowing where your people are (accountability) Not knowing how your people are (feeling unwell prior to activity )

10 Heat Stroke or Heat Exhaustion? The telling difference is mental confusion/disorientation in ALL heat stroke victims. You can ask these 3 questions. 1."What is your name?" 2."What day is this?" 3."Where are we?" If a worker can’t answer these questions, assume it is heat stroke. How do you tell the difference??

11 How emergency medical services will be provided should they become necessary:  Members with signs/symptoms  Members observing other members with signs/symptoms MUST inform supervisor immediately Member will be temporarily relieved from duty

12 Responding to signs & symptoms of heat-related illness Employers (supervisors) must:  For employees showing signs or demonstrating symptoms of heat-related illness: –relieve them from duty –provide a sufficient means to reduce body temperature –monitor them to determine whether medical attention is necessary  Also applicable: –Medic 1 protocols –District 8 Rehab policy –NET Safety Program section on Outdoor Heat Exposure

13 Additional Information and training for supervisors – implementing the standard 1.Encourage members to stay hydrated – ensure all apparatus carry some water. Check water daily during rig checks. 2.Where possible, schedule work activities for cooler times of the day 3.When working outdoors, implement rest breaks at least every hour and ensure water or OAB is readily accessible, especially during breaks 4.Stay aware of members and encourage hydrating at breaks 5.Plan for rehab

14 Additional Information and training for supervisors – heat related illness reporting When members report / are reported with signs/symptoms of heat related illness, they shall be immediately relieved from duty until appropriate rest, evaluation and treatment can be provided Affected members must not be left alone If signs and symptoms are or could possibly be heat exhaustion or heat stroke, an EMS call will be initiated. EMS and Medic 1 Protocols shall be followed.

15 Additional Information and training for supervisors – heat related illness report If signs/symptoms are heat rash or heat cramps, appropriate treatments shall be initiated. Members receiving ALS interventions or that are transported to the hospital shall be relieved from duty for the rest of the shift Members receiving other EMS care or treatments may be relieved for the rest of the shift based on the outcome of the treatments/interventions provided

16 Additional Information and training for supervisors – accessibility of patient If the member is in an inaccessible location, the supervisor / IC shall request such resources as needed to transport the member to a accessible location.

17 Remember, we don’t really have acclimatization issues here, BUT some members may be less acclimatized due to being gone from work for awhile or if we experience high heat. Temperature action levels can be as low as 52 degrees F if the member is in turnouts; 77 degrees F if wearing 2 layers. Additional Info and Resources

18 Drinking water or OAB must be readily available for members at all times and members need to have the opportunity to drink at least a quart every hour. Environments such as inside vehicle cabs, sheds, and tents or other temporary structures may be considered an outdoor environment if the environmental factors affecting temperature are not managed by engineering controls (like AC, fans, etc). Additional Info and Resources

19 Washington State Department of Labor and Industries – Outdoor heat exposure resources Washington State Department of Labor and Industries – Video Library Heat Stress: Don't Lose Your Cool - Video ID: V0931 Heat Stress: Don't Lose Your Cool Working Safely in Hot Environments - Video ID: V0955 Working Safely in Hot Environments Heat Stress Prevention - Video ID: V0092 Heat Stress Prevention Heat Stress - Video ID: V0358 Heat Stress

20 Additional Help Contact L&I Consultants You can call one of our industrial hygiene or safety consultants for additional assistance in evaluating your workplace for heat- related illness hazards. This is a confidential, free service not connected to regulatory inspections. Region 4: Clark, Cowlitz, Grays Harbor, Klickitat, Lewis, Mason, Pacific, Skamania, Thurston, and Wahkiakum counties

21 Questions? If you have questions that have not been answered in this presentation, please contact your supervisor or the Division Chief, Health and Safety


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