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Steve Cross Vice President, Georgia Institute of Technology Adjunct Professor, College of Computing Director, GTRI 3/9/2010 Strategic Plan (DRAFT) Leading.

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Presentation on theme: "Steve Cross Vice President, Georgia Institute of Technology Adjunct Professor, College of Computing Director, GTRI 3/9/2010 Strategic Plan (DRAFT) Leading."— Presentation transcript:

1 Steve Cross Vice President, Georgia Institute of Technology Adjunct Professor, College of Computing Director, GTRI 3/9/2010 Strategic Plan (DRAFT) Leading Transformation to Design the Future

2 We must address issues and create circumstances that ensure success in the future. What role will we have in preparing students for leadership and success in aWhat role will we have in preparing students for leadership and success in a globalized world? How will we use science and technology to help society address major problems?How will we use science and technology to help society address major problems? How will we build an enterprise that can be sustained in an ever-changing environment?How will we build an enterprise that can be sustained in an ever-changing environment? What will we be on our 150 th anniversary?What will we be on our 150 th anniversary? Transforming the Future at Georgia Tech

3 What is success? confluence of culture, competence, and circumstance Chris Langan IQ 195/210 - Bouncer Robert Oppenheimer Genius - Lead scientist Manhattan Project Outliers are those who have been given opportunities and those who have had the strength and presence of mind to seize them. -- No one makes it alone.-- There’s no such thing as an overnight success.

4 Strategic Planning – Timeline August 3, 2009 August 3, 2009 Pres. offsite to identify key issues August 24, August 24, st Meeting/Steering Committee September 3, 2009 September 3, 2009 Inauguration and formal kickoff September 24, 2009 September 24, 2009 Parents Association Workshop September 25, 2009 September 25, 2009 GTAB Mtg. to discuss Issues and plan ….. ONGOING OPEN COMMUNITY DISCUSSIONS ONGOING OPEN COMMUNITY DISCUSSIONS December, 2009 December, 2009 Initial Steering Committee Drafts due March, 2010 March, 2010Publish 1 st draft ONGOING OPEN COMMUNITY DISCUSSIONS ONGOING OPEN COMMUNITY DISCUSSIONS May, 2010 May, 2010 Final Draft to Communications Summer 2010 Summer 2010 Review with various constituencies August, 2010 August, 2010 Strategic Plan finalized and printed September 2010 September 2010 Introduce Georgia Tech’s New Strategic Plan October 2010 October 2010 Public announcement of Capital Campaign We must identify where we want to go and then plan how best to get there.

5 What We Believe Vision: Be the defining technological research university of the 21 st centuryMission: Provide leadership in fields that span engineering, science, policy and innovation through preeminent research, education, and outreachValues: Excellence, leadership, service, integrity, diversity, entrepreneurism, innovative spirit

6 Strategic Themes Be preeminent in scholarship and Be preeminent in scholarship and research research Serve as the learning destination Serve as the learning destination Embrace innovation, entrepreneurship Embrace innovation, entrepreneurship and public service and public service Continual quest for institutional Continual quest for institutional excellence excellence Engage the world Engage the world

7 Be Preeminent in Scholarship and Research (1/4) Goal 1: Establish dominant culture of excellence for all academic units - “10 in 10”Goal 1: Establish dominant culture of excellence for all academic units - “10 in 10” Strategy 1(a) - Unit drive to preeminence Strategy 1(b) - Central administration support of achieving preeminence Goal 2: Be identified as the thought leader in a small number of very large reputational spaces by demonstrating all-in, “One-Georgia Tech” initiativesGoal 2: Be identified as the thought leader in a small number of very large reputational spaces by demonstrating all-in, “One-Georgia Tech” initiatives Strategy 2(a) - Develop a process by which such domains are selected in consultation with our academic units and institutes, and a strategic analysis conducted via a rigorous but open process. Strategy 2(b) - Structure the institute so that a broad spectrum attack on these problem domains is launched. This is the embodiment of the One-Georgia Tech stance.

8 Be Preeminent in Scholarship and Research (2/2) Goal 3: Empower organic bottom-up initiatives for interdisciplinary thematic research Goal 3: Empower organic bottom-up initiatives for interdisciplinary thematic research Strategy 3 - Research Venture Fund Goal 4: Be vital – invest in people, reinforce a collegial but excellence-seeking culture, and deploy world-class Goal 4: Be vital – invest in people, reinforce a collegial but excellence-seeking culture, and deploy world-class Goal 5: Build a model health, wellness and prevention system on campus based on 21 st century Goal 5: Build a model health, wellness and prevention system on campus based on 21 st century

9 Be Preeminent in Scholarship and Research (3/4) Goal 4: Be vital – invest in people, reinforce a collegial but excellence-seeking culture, and deploy world-class Goal 4: Be vital – invest in people, reinforce a collegial but excellence-seeking culture, and deploy world-class Strategy 4(a) - Establish career development chairs and other ‘packages’ for recruiting and retaining proven high power professors, potentially emphasizing mid-career scientists. Recruit future national academy members. Hire 100 net highly productive scientists in the next five years. Strategy 4(b) - Leverage the tying of compensation to performance and aspiration (see strategy 1.2.2) to attract entrepreneurial talent. Strategy 4(c) - Double world-class research space available, high-level research facilitating staff, and build research and intellectual neighborhoods. Transform the facility and research infrastructure of the campus into a key draw for top talent. Strategy 4(d) - Celebrate excellence and leadership in scholarship and research. Scholarly achievements will be publicly applauded and positions of research leadership encouraged. Strategy 4(e) - In partnership with the State, aggressively recruit global/industry research institutes to the Georgia Tech campus.

10 Be Preeminent in Scholarship and Research (4/4) Goal 5: Build a model health, wellness and prevention system on campus based on 21 st century technologiesGoal 5: Build a model health, wellness and prevention system on campus based on 21 st century technologies Strategy 5(a) – Georgia Tech will partner a healthcare system or company to establish a campus-wide system designed to encourage proper behavioral and lifestyle choices for chronic disease management and healthcare maintenance... Georgia Tech will deploy a secure campus-wide system of personal health records and will train faculty, staff and students on its proper use. It will provide members of the Georgia Tech community with access to highly personalized health information and advice. Strategy 5(b) – All community members can volunteer to participate in long-term research projects on personalized health as part of an effort to understand the long-term consequences of nutrition, behavior, clinical treatments and geonomics on the development and outcome of disease. All campus dining facilities will be equipped with technology to determine personalized menu suggestions based on nutritional needs and goals. Strategy 5(c) – De-identified information from personal health records will be used as a database for research in clinical effectiveness. The most successful Georgia Tech initiatives will become available more broadly to improve the health of Georgians.

11 Serve as the Learning Destination Strategy 1 Strategy 1 – Enrichment of faculty-student interaction Strategy 2 Strategy 2 – Collaboration among diverse learners across the world Strategy 3 Strategy 3 – Innovation in instruction methods, course design and curricula Strategy 4 Strategy 4 – Develop the campus as a vibrant Live-Work-Learn-Play environment

12 Embrace Innovation, Entrepreneurship & Public Service Strategy 1Strategy 1 - Education of tomorrow’s entrepreneurs and leaders Strategy 2Strategy 2 - Empowerment of the faculty Strategy 3Strategy 3 - Commitment to outreach and economic development

13 Continual Quest for Institutional Excellence Goal 1 -Goal 1 - Business practice culture based on performance metrics Goal 2 -Goal 2 - Create a concierge atmosphere of customer service Goal 3 -Goal 3 - Make Georgia tech a place that develops, nurtures and enables leadership

14 Engage the World Strategy 1Strategy 1 - Expansion of the world’s footprint at Georgia Tech Strategy 2Strategy 2 - Georgia Tech’s footprint around the globe Strategy 3Strategy 3 - Globally engaged students

15 QuestionsorComments Success is not a random act. It arises out of a predictable and powerful set of circumstances and opportunities… — Malcolm Gladwell (Outliers)

16 Clash of TitansClash of Titans Hot, Flat & CrowdedHot, Flat & Crowded Lifespan MeccaLifespan Mecca Network U.Network U. Scenarios for 2035 Dominant Issues, Economic Implications Social Implications

17 General DescriptionGeneral Description GT continues to battle with MIT and Stanford for dominance in Engineering, as well as competing with CA, VA, and MI for top public university, and with premier international universities for global rankings Dominant IssuesDominant Issues The competition for talent becomes fierce, with well-endowed chairs becoming the minimum for attracting talent; top students at all levels expect and get near-free education Economic ImplicationsEconomic Implications The top players continue to dominate receipt of Federal funds, with considerable pushback from other players; costs of facilities and labs soar, much of which must be raised from philanthropic sources Social ImplicationsSocial Implications University cultures are sustained, with adaptations for a decreasingly Caucasian male population – for both students and faculty -- but one that is committed to the values and sense of purpose that has been central for recent decades; changing demographics impacts how alumni best relate to their alma maters Clash of Titans “What a dangerous precedent. What if there are more heroes like him? What if courage and imagination became everyday mortal qualities? What will become of us?” Thetis: Clash of the Titans

18 General DescriptionGeneral Description Global parity emerges in graduate education in science and technology, particularly for traditional disciplines and subdisciplines; greater collaboration among institutions emerges; demand for higher education in the U.S. will nevertheless increase substantially Dominant IssuesDominant Issues Many of the best jobs are in Asia; scarcity and constraints dominate sustainability debates; clashes of belief systems create political turmoil and security concerns; meeting demands presents strong challenges Economic ImplicationsEconomic Implications Federal and state support diminish as portions of budget; industrial and philanthropic support are increasingly competitive; sponsors become sensitive to where resources are deployed; undergraduate tuition stabilizes and increases are less and less acceptable Social ImplicationsSocial Implications Global footprint of top universities increase by necessity; social, cultural, and ethnic diversity of faculty and students increases in turn; traditional business practices, e.g., promotion and tenure, must change to accommodate diversity Hot, Flat & Crowded The trends of Hot, Flat and crowded are converging. 1. Hot = Global Warming 2. Flat = Globalization of marketplaces 3. Crowded = Growing competition for resources

19 General DescriptionGeneral Description Demand for postgraduate and executive education surges as career changes become quite common; demand steadily grows for education and arts by an increasingly urban older population Dominant IssuesDominant Issues Two or three MS or MA degrees become common across careers, as do often required certificate programs; multiple artistic performance and sporting events per day become common Economic ImplicationsEconomic Implications Tuition revenues soar for executive programs and graduate education programs popular with elders; revenues from artistic performance and sports venues become significant portions of university budgets Social ImplicationsSocial Implications Median age of students increases substantially, changing the campus culture substantially; older students in particular expect and get high quality, user-friendly services; diversity of faculty increases substantially to satisfy diversity of demands Lifespan Mecca The non-traditional student is becoming the traditional as people embrace a lifetime of learning.

20 General DescriptionGeneral Description Social technology prevails; access to the best content and faculty is universal; nevertheless, students go to college to learn and mature; however, the classroom experience is now highly interactive, both remotely and face-to-face Dominant IssuesDominant Issues Students and faculty have broad and easy access to knowledge, often via other people; with the “best in class” universally available, local faculty play more facilitative roles in small (10-20) “high touch” discussion groups Economic ImplicationsEconomic Implications More teaching professionals are needed for recitation-sized classes; teaching skills are at a premium; increasing numbers of high quality programs result in strong downward pressure on tuition and fees; faculty research becomes near totally externally funded Social ImplicationsSocial Implications Students and faculty are networkers par excellence; both within and across institutions; students evaluations of teaching effectiveness play an increasing role; students seamlessly transition from K-12 to university to lifespan education Network U. What can we do now to ensure that we are included in the “best of the best” in the world?”

21 What is success? confluence of culture, competence, and circumstance Chris Langan IQ 195/210 - Bouncer Robert Oppenheimer Genius - Lead scientist Manhattan Project Outliers are those who have been given opportunities and those who have had the strength and presence of mind to seize them. -- No one makes it alone.-- There’s no such thing as an overnight success.


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