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A GREEN GRANGE Under the guidance of Tim Downing, Duratherm Windows will help repair the Grange, using green materials to minimize the building’s heating.

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Presentation on theme: "A GREEN GRANGE Under the guidance of Tim Downing, Duratherm Windows will help repair the Grange, using green materials to minimize the building’s heating."— Presentation transcript:

1 A GREEN GRANGE Under the guidance of Tim Downing, Duratherm Windows will help repair the Grange, using green materials to minimize the building’s heating costs, reduce its carbon footprint, and increase its lifespan. -All appliances will be EnergyStar compliant. -The south-side emergency exit will be constructed with Perennial wood, a locally available wood made by Hammond Lumber. Hammond treats the wood thermally and chemically (using non-toxic materials) to create stable, decay-resistant, and insect-resistant lumber. -The steps on the north side will be constructed using Cambia wood. Cambia wood, made by Northland Forest Products (NFP®) is a strong wood that’s thermally modified to improve dimensional stability and decay resistance. The Cambia wood will come from regionally harvested Yellow Poplar trees, which, as ensured by NFP®, will be responsibly harvested to guarantee sustainability. -Glazed and argon-filled windows will offer improved thermal performance, both maximizing heating from solar radiation and offering insulation. -Efficient water heaters will be installed. -Energy-saving LED lighting and T-9 fluorescent fixtures, courtesy of CMP and Efficiency Maine, will be installed indoors & out. The Eco-Friendly Restoration of a Smithfield Community Pillar THE HISTORY BEHIND THE GRANGE THE GRANGE MOVEMENT: 19 th CENTURY However, by the 1860’s, Kelley was struggling financially. In fact, all farmers were struggling to make any profits, especially when they tried to sell their goods out-of-state. Monopolies had taken control over the shipping companies and railroads, and the price of shipping agricultural products skyrocketed, though the need for them had diminished with the end of the Civil War. Kelley was determined to fight back. He started a national "Secret Society of the Agriculturalist," a fraternal organization whose members worked together in economic cooperation, education, and political lobbying. This Society launched the Grange movement in 1867, and by 1868, had already began organizing individual Granges. MAINE GRANGES: 19 th TO 20 th CENTURY In 1873, the Order of the Patrons of Husbandry arrived in Maine with the establishment of Hampden Grange. As would all Maine Granges, it offered insurance, advocated railroad and banking regulation, and promoted group purchasing. As the monopolies continued to grow during the ‘70’s, so too did membership to the Grange. From 1874 to 1876 alone, the number of Maine members shot up from 2,000 to 12,000. Throughout the ‘80’s, the Grange became education oriented, encouraging reading, debates, and discussion of legislative issues. Pomona Granges (Granges at the county level) were created and the Order of Husbandry expanded across the state. By 1907, Maine’s per capita Grange membership was the largest in the country. In the Progressive era, the Order took a legislative stand to support prohibition, curbs on monopolies, the direct primary, and voting rights for women, granting women voting rights in the Grange before the passage of the 19th Amendment. The Order also ensured the education of its members, continually teaching new scientific methods of farming and household management. During World War II, the Grange supported those in combat, paying their dues and sending them clothing and food. After 1960, Grange membership began to decrease with changes in insurance laws and the general decline in the need for farming. THE FAIRVIEW GRANGE: 20 th CENTURY TO 21 st CENTURY Since the beginning of its existence, the Fairview Grange has served as a center for farmers, their families, and the surrounding Smithfield community. Fairview Grange was founded on January 17, Meetings were held in the “Town House,” or Town Hall, on the second floor. The organization, which started with only 35 charter members, swelled to 85 by the end of the year. For the next fifteen years, members met to discuss farming techniques, legislation, and the construction of their own Grange hall. Oliver Hudson Kelley was the founder of the Order of the Patrons of Husbandry, or the “Grange movement.” In 1849, Kelley moved to Itasca, Minnesota at twenty-one and decided to learn how to farm. He invested in modern technology and experimented with agricultural techniques, and by 1852 had created the Benton County Agricultural Society, eager to learn more from and communicate with farmers in the surrounding area. Throughout the ‘50’s, Kelley had emerged as a prominent farmer, becoming renowned in the area for his meticulous seed statistics and his innovative approaches to planting. A LAKE RESOURCE CENTER FOR NORTH POND Under the leadership of Rick Watson, the North Pond Association (NPA) will turn the grounds of the Fairview Grange into a park-like setting, designed to showcase “best management practices” (BMP’s). Examples of BMP’s include *The rip-rapping of a shoreline, in which stones create a protective barrier between the land and water, thereby reducing the effect of erosion and tidal action. In doing so, rip- rapping also increases the shoreline’s lifespan and beautifies it. *The establishment of a rain garden to create a better buffer zone between the Grange and the shore, helping to reduce erosion and catch phosphates that could leech into the water and pollute it. *“Recycling” rain barrels that catch gutter water to in turn water plants and reduce run-off. The grounds will feature tours to allow people to learn environmentally-friendly home improvement tips and how to implement them. MISSION POSSIBLE: SAVE THE FAIRVIEW GRANGE A LAKESMART FOCAL POINT Water quality is important; especially in an area such as the Belgrade Lakes region, in which communities develop around the water and depend on money generated by tourism. The renovation of the Grange property includes its transformation into a lake-friendly environment, and, more than likely, a LakeSmart environment. In doing so, the Grange will make a commitment to lake preservation, being the FIRST LakeSmart property on North Pond to do so. The Grange will function as a model so that other North Pond property owners can follow suit. Owners of LakeSmart property commit to stabilizing eroding areas, reducing the use of chemicals, and maintaining buffer zones. In order to be LakeSmart certified, a Soil & Water Conservation employee (or other qualified individual) will visit the property and rate the owner’s application of landscaping practices in the following five categories: -Road, Driveway, and Parking Areas -Structures and Septic System -Lawn, Recreation Areas, and Footpaths -Shorefront and Beach -Undeveloped Land. A score of 67% or more points in a given category merits a LakeSmart certificate; a score of 67% or greater in the first four categories merits a sign (pictured above) as well. “Pristine lake waters add beauty, increase property value, and provide recreational opportunities throughout the seasons. Studies have shown that as water quality declines, the value of shorefront property… decreases. Declining water quality can also affect the type and number of fish species that inhabit the lake and can hinder other recreational uses of the lake as well as the local economy.” – Maine Department of Environmental Protection RIP RAP REVETMENT OF SHORELINE AT RIGHT: A model of the Duratherm water heater that will be in the renovated Grange. This heater, currently at the Duratherm facility, reduced energy usage from 4879 KwH to 1856 KwH, resulting in a 62% yearly decrease in energy usage. CITATIONS The Grange: Farmer's Movement. Digital image. St. Rosemary Educational Institution, Web. 15 June Hartman, Dorothy W. "Order of the Patrons of Husbandry— The Grange." Grange - Movement. Connor Prairie, n.d. Web. 16 June Howe, Stan. "Our History." Our History Maine State Grange. Maine State Grange, 201. Web. 17 June "LakeSmart." Lakesmart, Maine DEP. Maine Department of Environmental Protection, Web. 18 June "Places - Appleton, “The Little Mohea”." Maine Folklife Center. University of Maine, Web. 17 June Rvntmnt.gif. Digital image. Revetments. Lake Ontario Riparian Alliance, n.d. Web. 16 June Thottumkara, Arun. "Post-Civil War Agraian Discontent and the Granger Movement." Post-Civil War Agraian Discontent and the Granger Movement. Illinois State Library, Web. 19 June THIS PROJECT MADE POSSIBLE BY Tim Downing, President of Duratherm David Hartford of the Smithfield Grange Jim Fleming, STS Department at Colby College Rick Watson, President of North Pond Association Richard Witham of the Smithfield Grange NSF EPSCoR Grant #EPS By 1986, the Grange had running water, central heating, restrooms, and offices; in short, it was completely modern. However, on February 18 th, disaster struck. A fire swept through the building, leaving the members to watch nearly 70 years of memories burn. Yet, the members of the Grange were not to be defeated; just two days after the devastating event, they met and voted to rebuild. Seven months later, on September 10, 1986, the new hall was finished. Since that time, the Grange has continued to play a role in the Smithfield community, hosting town events, implementing a flag program, and acting as an advocate for a sustainable future. The construction of the first Grange hall took place less than a ½ mile from the Town House, on a narrow strip of land between a stream and a road leading to Sunset Beach. Unfortunately, the Grange was never completed. On October 13, 1913, the Hall was engulfed in flames as fire spread from a neighboring home. Within the next year, the Town House also burned down. On October 10, 1914, the members purchased a new plot of land for $500. The second Grange was completed the following year, built 30 x 65 feet and 2 stories tall. Over the next 70 years, it became a pinnacle of the community, helping raise money to build a new town hall (1915), hosting the 100 th anniversary of Smithfield (1940), and holding events such as suppers, parties, and dances. 2 nd Grange after fire Current Grange By Kathy Lipshultz Colby College ‘16


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