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Christos Laoutaris. New TV Displays:  OLED Technology  3D TV Technology  Ultra Hi-Vision TV Computer Monitors.

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Presentation on theme: "Christos Laoutaris. New TV Displays:  OLED Technology  3D TV Technology  Ultra Hi-Vision TV Computer Monitors."— Presentation transcript:

1 Christos Laoutaris

2 New TV Displays:  OLED Technology  3D TV Technology  Ultra Hi-Vision TV Computer Monitors

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4 OLED - Organic Light Emitting Diode An OLED consists of an emissive organic material, that when supplied with an electrical current, can produce a superior full-color flat panel display.

5 Substrate (clear plastic, glass, foil) - The substrate supports the OLED.  Emissive and conductive layer lie between the cathode and the anode layers

6 Substrate (clear plastic, glass, foil) - The substrate supports the OLED.  Emissive and conductive layer lie between the cathode and the anode layers  A current is applied across the LED, where electrons move from cathode to anode

7 Substrate (clear plastic, glass, foil) - The substrate supports the OLED.  Emissive and conductive layer lie between the cathode and the anode layers  A current is applied across the LED, where electrons move from cathode to anode  The cathode gives electrons to the emissive layer, where the anode withdraws these electrons from the conductive layer 

8 Substrate (clear plastic, glass, foil) - The substrate supports the OLED.  Emissive and conductive layer lie between the cathode and the anode layers  A current is applied across the LED, where electrons move from cathode to anode  The cathode gives electrons to the emissive layer, where the anode withdraws these electrons from the conductive layer  The emissive layer becomes rich in negative charge while the conductive layer becomes more positively charged 

9 Substrate (clear plastic, glass, foil) - The substrate supports the OLED.  Emissive and conductive layer lie between the cathode and the anode layers  A current is applied across the LED, where electrons move from cathode to anode  The cathode gives electrons to the emissive layer, where the anode withdraws these electrons from the conductive layer  The emissive layer becomes rich in negative charge while the conductive layer becomes more positively charged  The two charges recombine in the emissive layer, creating a drop in energy levels of the electrons  The drop in energy levels results in radiation that is on the visible spectrum, emitting light

10 Passive OLEDs The organic layer is between strips of cathode and anode that run perpendicular The intersections form the pixels Easy to make Use more power Best for small screens Active OLEDs Full layers of cathode and anode Anode over lays a thin film transistor (TFT) Requires less power Higher refresh rates Suitable for large screens

11 Transparent OLEDs Transparent OLEDs have only transparent components (substrate, cathode and anode) When a transparent OLED display is turned on, it allows light to pass in both directions. A transparent OLED display can be either active- or passive-matrix

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13 Released XEL-1 in February First OLED TV sold in stores. 11'' screen, 3mm thin US$2500 Weighs approximately 1.9 kg Wide 178 degree viewing angle 1,000,000:1 Contrast ratio Sony

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16  Sony plans to introduce new OLED TVs soon. There are talks of a 27", 21" or maybe even 30" TVs.  Samsung 30-inch 3D AMOLED TV  LG 31’’ 3D OLED TV

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19 OLED Displays Vs. LCD and Plasma 1. Thinner, lighter and more flexible

20 OLED Displays Vs. LCD and Plasma 1. Thinner, lighter and more flexible The plastic, organic layers of an OLED are thinner, lighter and more flexible than the crystalline layers in a LED or LCD

21 OLED Displays Vs. LCD and Plasma 1. Thinner, lighter and more flexible 2. Bright from all viewing angles

22 OLED Displays Vs. LCD and Plasma 1. Thinner, lighter and more flexible 2. Bright from all viewing angles OLEDs have large fields of view, about 170 degrees.

23 OLED Displays Vs. LCD and Plasma 1. Thinner, lighter and more flexible 2. Bright from all viewing angles OLEDs have large fields of view, about 170 degrees. LCDs work by blocking light, while OLEDs produce their own light, therefore OLED have a much wider viewing range.

24 OLED Displays Vs. LCD and Plasma 1. Thinner, lighter and more flexible 2. Bright from all viewing angles OLEDs have large fields of view, about 170 degrees. LEDs and LCDs require glass for support, and glass absorbs some light. OLEDs do not require glass.

25 OLED Displays Vs. LCD and Plasma 1. Thinner, lighter and more flexible 2. Bright from all viewing angles 3 Consume significantly less energy

26 OLED Displays Vs. LCD and Plasma 1. Thinner, lighter and more flexible 2. Bright from all viewing angles 3 Consume significantly less energy Because OLEDs do not require backlighting, they consume much less power than LCDs (most of the LCD power goes to the backlighting)

27 OLED Displays Vs. LCD and Plasma 1. Thinner, lighter and more flexible 2. Bright from all viewing angles 3 Consume significantly less energy 4. OLEDs refresh almost 1,000 times faster then LCDs 5. Easier Production Process - Potentially Lower Production Costs

28 OLED Displays Vs. LCD and Plasma 1. Lifetime - The organic material that is being used only has a limited lifespan.

29 OLED Displays Vs. LCD and Plasma 1. Lifetime - The organic material that is being used only has a limited lifespan. According to some studies, after around 14,000 hours (5 years per 8 hours a day) of using OLED television the quality of images(blue color) will fade half to its original brightness. Unlike its competitors which lifespan is around 60,000 hours.

30 OLED Displays Vs. LCD and Plasma 1. Lifetime - The organic material that is being used only has a limited lifespan. According to some studies, after around 14,000 hours (5 years per 8 hours a day) of using OLED television the quality of images(blue color) will fade half to its original brightness. Unlike its competitors which lifespan is around 60,000 hours. 2. Manufacturing - Manufacturing processes are expensive right now. 3. Water - Water can easily damage OLEDs.

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32 Overview of 3D display techniques Stereoscopic Display Auto -Stereoscopic Display

33 33 History of 3D (stereoscopic) contents 1858World’s first three-dimensional image (still picture) was shown: 1895 Motion pictures are invented: The Lumière brothers of France (Auguste and Louis) 1922Premiere of the first 3D movie: The first 3D movie featuring the anaglyph process, “The Power of Love”, 1952 – 1954The first 3D cinema boom: As the number of movie- goers declined with the growing popularity of television, 1981 – 1984The second wave of 3D cinema: Many directors start to actively produce 3D movies again when CATV channels begin to broadcast 3D programs.

34 3D movie releases over the years

35  A stereoscopic effect can be obtained from video on a flat two-dimensional (2D) screen by employing some form of filtering to ensure that information representing a different perspective is presented to each eye LeftRight Combined

36 Active Stereoscopic TV using ◦ Colored glasses ◦ Shutter glasses  Passive Stereoscopic TV using: ◦ Polarised glasses

37  This is the oldest of all of the stereoscopic projection systems;  Practical with most existing displays;  Already used on some Blu-Ray discs  Very low cost passive glasses  Colour reproduction problems  Poor quality “3D” results in a home viewing environment

38  Plasma, LCD (240Hz w/LED Backlight) and soon OLED.  Full 1080p image per eye (Plasma and LCD)  Glasses can be up to 150€ per pair  Currently almost all consumer 3D displays are active glasses based.  Batteries Required  Communicates with TV via BlueTooth or Infrared

39  Each filter passes only that light which is similarly polarized and blocks the light polarized in the opposite direction, each eye sees a different image  Half resolution per eye  Polarizing filter adds significant cost to the display  Uses inexpensive circular polarized glasses

40  Sky 3D is a 3DTV channel in UK that launched on 3 April 2010 with the Manchester United vs Chelsea football match being broadcast in over a thousand pubs across England in 3D.  On 1 October 2010, Sky 3D became available to residential subscribers.

41  Autostereoscopic 3D television sets have two main technologies lenticular lenses and parallax barrier. Parallax barrierLenticular sheet

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43 Toshiba recommend sitting 65cm away from the 12-inch display and 90cm away from the 90cm panel.

44  Ultra High Definition Television (UHDTV) is an experimental digital video format, currently proposed by NHK of Japan, the BBC, and RAI.  NHK is calling this video format Super Hi- Vision (SHV)

45 45 Super Hi-Vision has extremely high spatial resolution, 33 million pixels per frame, and it can provide viewers with stunning images. The wide visual angle of 100 degrees provides viewers with an immersive feeling. The purpose of Super Hi-Vision to home is to provide a totally new viewing experience to enjoy wide and extremely high resolution images from any viewing distance Viewing distance : 0.75 x Picture height Viewing angle : 100 degrees

46 Comparison between HDTV – Digital Cinema and Super Hi-Vision

47 The BBC, in conjunction with Japanese public broadcaster NHK, have collaborated for a live performance with a Super Hi-Vision camera at 7,680x4,320 (8K) resolution and sent the live broadcast to Japan. broadcast-from-uk-to-japan-is-one-for-the/ broadcast-from-uk-to-japan-is-one-for-the/

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49 99% of the LCDs sold today come with TN(Twisted Nematic + Film) panels TN panels have good response time, usually have better contrast controls, and are above all, cheap. However, TN Panels suffer from bad viewing angles, and low NTSC color gamut. Also most digital displays on the market today cannot surpass 24-bit “True Color” depth (meaning 8 bits per channel, or 256x256x256 RGB)

50 IPS technology (In Plane Switching) IPS technology was developed by Hitachi in 1996 to solve the two main limitations of TN-matrices at the time, those being small viewing angles and low-quality color reproduction

51 IPS displays have better viewing angles (often 179° horizontal, and 170° to 179° vertical)

52 P-IPS Technology  Thirty-bit color (10 bits per channel, or 1024x1024x1024 RGB) expands the gamut into the “Deep Color” territory of more than a billion hues–1.07 billion.  Though the human eye can only reliably perceive about 10 million colors.

53 Comparison between viewing angles of a TN panel and an IPS panel. TN panels IPS

54 Higher Gamut from old LCD technology Apple 24’’ LED Cinema Display gamut graph IPS - HP LP2480ZX gamut graph

55 An example of 10-bit P-IPS LCD Lacie announced 324i monitor end of September 2010 and it costs $1,249

56 Fujitsu Launches World's First all in one PC with Full 3D Experience. There is a 3D webcam. The camera allows the user to have 3D video chats or video calls and to take 3D video of themselves.

57 Touch Monitors 42" iTable from PQ Labs with 32 touch points and resolution of 1920*1080 A computer system running the company's touchscreen software is enclosed in the 1.5in thick iTable

58  Thank you!


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