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Welsh Centre for Printing and Coating Plastic electronics for Smart Packaging Dr. Davide Deganello Contact

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Presentation on theme: "Welsh Centre for Printing and Coating Plastic electronics for Smart Packaging Dr. Davide Deganello Contact"— Presentation transcript:

1 Welsh Centre for Printing and Coating Plastic electronics for Smart Packaging Dr. Davide Deganello Contact email: d.deganello@swansea.ac.ukd.deganello@swansea.ac.uk College of Engineering Bridging Borders, 26 th Sept 2013, Belfast

2 What is printing today? One of the World’s largest industries An advanced, precision volume manufacturing process

3 Industrial Graphic Printing Industrial printing presses: Web widths up to 4.5m, speeds up to 1000m/min

4 Printing challenges Graphic Printing Eye “compensates” Printed Electronics New level of accuracy / understanding required

5 Welsh Centre for Printing and Coating Fundamental research Graphics & Packaging Printed Electronics Medical & Biotechnology Solutions for Industry Centre of excellence for R&D in Industrial Printing Funded in 1994, based at Swansea University, UK

6 Comprehensive Facilities R2R, sheet fed and small scale printing Ink development and manufacture Analysis of materials and prints

7 WCPC Converting ideas into volume products WCPC : working with Industry

8 Packaging & Smart Packaging Packaging market Estimates: > 820B$ by 2016 Higher growth sectors: Healthcare, cosmetic, food (source:rexam) Source: Smithers Pira

9 Printing Packaging technology Flexography: Ink transfer through a raised imaged photopolymer plate

10 Packaging Current trends in Packaging: Premiumisation of every-day products Increased communication to the consumer Environmental considerations Cost reduction Smart Packaging

11 Smart packaging : Packaging moves from an “inert” to an active role Packaging monitors the product Product condition, lifespan, logistic, authenticity Packaging interacts with consumer: Increased flow of information, consumer confidence Cost must be feasible

12 Smart Packaging Current Smart Packaging: Some Examples

13 Smart Packaging: RFID Labels RFID Labels: Radio frequency identification labels Monitoring expensive/dangerous products Reduce logistic costs: Wall-Mart mandate (2006) Current limit to wide use: cost per RFID label ( 0.10 $) Fully printed RFID (PolyIC) Future: roll2roll inline integration From http://www.polyic.com/

14 Smart Packaging: Thermo-chromic Thermo-chromic labels: color-changing labels which respond to cumulative exposure to temperature. Monitor individual item handling Possible Issue: Subjectivity Food decay chromic sensors under development From http://www.freshcheck.com/

15 Electronics & Smart Packaging Smart Packaging: What is its next future?

16 Electronics & Smart Packaging Integration of Printed electronics into packaging: Next development of smart packaging New level of interaction between consumer and product Improved Security of the product A “revolution in packaging”

17 Electronics & Smart Packaging Electronic & Packaging integration: Example 1 Adaptive displays integrated in the packaging Courtesy of Faraday packaging

18 Electronics & Smart Packaging Electronic & Packaging integration: Example 2 Active monitoring: Display information Sensors Data logging Clear statement of quality: Objective Courtesy of Faraday packaging

19 Electronics & Smart Packaging Why Printed electronics instead than “silicon”? Printing is affordability, larger-area, flexible substrates But lower performance (micron-features not nano) Easy integration with current packaging production Electronic components to be printed Displays Sensors Power sources CPU ? Touch screens (available)

20 Display/Lighting Technologies Flexible OLEDs: Efficient lighting at low DC voltage Major research area Limit: Humidity & cost of vapour barriers General Electric Fast2Light : FP7 IP on large area OLEDs technologies R2R Flexo Printing for accurate conductive micro-networks 70±3 μm

21 Printed Electronics ACCUFLEX: A dvancing Flexo for Printed Electronics TSB Funded project Improved registration, uniformity Plate resistance to solvents Partners: Innovia Films Asahi Photoproducts UK (Ltd) Tectonic International Gwent Electronic materials Millenium lasers Timsons Ltd

22 Display/Lighting Technologies Electroluminescence Lighting: Commercial reality Flexible, thin, lasting... Continuous progress Current limit: High AC Voltage http://www.youtube.com/user/Swanseaprinting

23 Display/Lighting Technologies Novel solution: Printable micro silicon-LEDs Micro LED printed between 2 conductive layers Low DC voltage & lasting NthDegree patented technology

24 Display/Lighting Technologies Printed display: e-inks, bi-stable inks on flexible substrate Energy required only to change status Complex image, complex driver electronics From http://www.ntera.com/ From http://www.plasticlogic.comhttp://www.plasticlogic.com

25 Active sensors R2R printed ZnNW sensors (P) Large area  high sensitivity Potassium sensing (P) (P): patented Printed sensors: Quantitative, affordable Humidity, temperature Gas and biological compounds Pharmaceutical market, Food market Integrated in packaging would allow a continuous monitoring throughout the chain From http://www.arkray.co.jp/

26 Power Printed Batteries: flexible and thin Adapt to required shape/space Collaborative project with HDM Stuttgart &

27 Power Printed photovoltaic: flexible and thin, several manufacturers Efficiency vs. Lifespan Large area solar cells on steel cladding Partnership Swansea Uni, TATA

28 Printed micro-networks Packaging Applications of printed micro-networks on flexible films R2R printed see-through RFID R2R printed micro-heaters R2R Strain gauges Magnetic coils (energy transfer)

29 What about Intelligence? Creating devices require a control unit: CPU Printed CPU: CIKC forefront Complex construction (not easy integration) Limited performance vs silicon Lifespan issues micron-features not nano Integrating silicon with high speed Printing Basic chips are economic (<1 p) Issue : connecting silicon to plastic R2R Pick&Place machines

30 What about Intelligence? Fine lines <10um Not for mass-production Research in advanced microcircuits New equipment at WCPC: Aereosol printer

31 Improving security Counterfeiting: key issue for suppliers & manufacturers Not only high-end, pharmaceutical products Memory circuits for brand protection From

32 Improving security Antibodies for brand protection R2R Printing of antibodies on plastic developed for bio-sensing Issues solved: adhesion on plastic and lifespan (patent) Antibodies are invisible until specific reagent introduced Highly safe counterfeiting system

33 New technologies: 3D Bioplotter Creation of 3D bio-scaffolds (e.g. bones) through a computer controlled filament deposition of bio-polymers GRAPHENEX: Digital printing pristine graphene polymer inks Graphene RFID

34 3D Bioplotter And......... 3D Chocolate........... www.youtube.com/user/Swanseaprinting

35 Conclusions Introduction to WCPC Providing solutions for Industry How smart will be our packaging? New technologies/demonstrators are now reality Manufacturing integrations under development

36 Welsh Centre for Printing and Coating College of Engineering Thank You Dr. Davide Deganello d.deganello@swansea.ac.uk

37 European Regional Development Fund Funded and supported by:- HEFCW Welsh Centre for Printing and Coating Canolfan Argraffu a Chaenu Cymru


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