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Electronics Recycling Workshop Presented in partnership by the New Mexico Recycling Association and the National Recycling Coalition Sponsored by Intel.

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Presentation on theme: "Electronics Recycling Workshop Presented in partnership by the New Mexico Recycling Association and the National Recycling Coalition Sponsored by Intel."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Electronics Recycling Workshop Presented in partnership by the New Mexico Recycling Association and the National Recycling Coalition Sponsored by Intel Corporation June 7, 2002

3 Why is e-waste the #1 Recycling Problem?

4 Proliferation of e-products

5 Source: Stanford Resources, 1999 Forecast of U.S. PC CPU Shipments,

6 Why is e-waste the #1 Recycling Problem? Proliferation of e-products +

7 Why is e-waste the #1 Recycling Problem? Proliferation of e-products + Increasingly short life-spans

8 Source: Stanford Resources, 1999 Average Product Lifespan (in years) ProductFirst LifeTotal Lifespan Desktop PC Desktop PC Desktop PC – Pentium I34-5 Desktop PC – Pentium II Mainframe computer77 Workstation computer4-5 CRT Computer Monitor46-7 CRT TV56-7 Notebook PC2-34 Computer peripherals35

9 Source: Stanford Resources, 1999 Lifespan of PCs

10 Obsolete PCs in the U.S., Year Units Shipped [M] Average Lifespan Share of PCs Lasting Number of Obsolete [M] 4 years3 years2 years %60%0% %80%0% %90%0% %80%20% %60%40% %40%60% %20%80% %10%90% % 100% % 100% % 100%61 Total500

11 Source: Stanford Resources, 1999 Forecast of U.S. PC CPU Shipments, Obsolescence and Recycling

12 Why is e-waste the #1 Recycling Problem? Proliferation of e-products + Increasingly short life-spans +

13 Why is e-waste the #1 Recycling Problem? Proliferation of e-products + Increasingly short life-spans + Toxic material constituents

14 Information compiled from multiple sources. Potentially Toxic Materials in PCs MaterialUse/LocationHealth Effects LeadMetal joining, radiation/CRT, PWB (printed wiring board) Damage to nervous and circulatory system, and kidneys; serious adverse effects on brain development MercuryBatteries, switches/housing, PWB Chronic brain, kidney, lung and fetal damage; effects on brain function and memory; a possible human carcinogen CadmiumBattery, blue-green phosphor emitter/housing, PWB, CRT Pulmonary damage, kidney disease, bone fragility; likely human carcinogen ArsenicDoping agent in transistors/PWB Allergic reactions, nausea, vomiting, decreased red and white blood cell production BerylliumThermal conductivity, PWB, connectors Lung damage, allergic reactions, chronic beryllium disease; likely human carcinogen

15 Why is e-waste the #1 Recycling Problem? Proliferation of e-products + Increasingly short life-spans + Toxic material constituents +

16 Why is e-waste the #1 Recycling Problem? Proliferation of e-products + Increasingly short life-spans + Toxic material constituents + No cogent strategy for end-of-life management

17 Why is e-waste the #1 Recycling Problem? Proliferation of e-products + Increasingly short life-spans + Toxic material constituents + No cogent strategy for end-of-life management =

18 Why is e-waste the #1 Recycling Problem? Proliferation of e-products + Increasingly short life-spans + Toxic material constituents + No cogent strategy for end-of-life management = Big Problem

19 Response to the Problem Local governments mobilizing to prevent wholesale disposal of e-waste State governments beginning to regulate and mandate potential solutions Federal government proposing to declassify CRTs as hazardous waste OEM’s and retailers implementing patchwork of programs to take back e-waste Stakeholders convening under National Electronics Product Stewardship Initiative Electronic recycling enterprises and donation centers ramping up

20 Current Status of Electronics Recycling Infrastructure Electronic recycling industry taking shape; most operations are independent, small- scale, labor intensive and regional

21 Stanford Resources, 1999 Distribution of Electronic Recyclers Sampled, Percent of Total by Region

22 Stanford Resources, 1999 Distribution of Recyclers Sampled, by Number of Employees

23 Current Status of Electronics Recycling Infrastructure Independent electronic recyclers industry taking shape; most operations are small- scale, labor intensive and regional

24 Current Status of Electronics Recycling Infrastructure Independent electronic recyclers industry taking shape; most operations are small- scale, labor intensive and regional Generators’ access to recycling varies by size, quality of used product stream, ability to pay, and geography

25 Recovery Options by Generator Type Generator: Large Corporations/Organizations/Agencies Options: Asset management/leasing opportunities with OEMs or equipment vendors Contracts with recyclers for material pick-up, processing and indemnification against future liability

26 Recovery Options by Generator Type Generator: Small Businesses/Organizations Options: Limited asset management/leasing opportunity Limited municipal recovery Onus on generator to identify recycler and arrange for material pick-up/delivery

27 Recovery Options by Generator Type Generator: Residential Options: Collection programs increasingly available Local reuse options Potential for product return to retailers and/or OEMs

28 Key Unresolved Issues Who should bear/share program costs? How do we differentiate between “legitimate” and “illegitimate” recycling, particularly overseas?


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