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Canadian Experience Iron and Steel Sector Prepared for the CEC North American Strategy for Catalyzing Cooperation on Dioxins, Furans and HCB Source Control.

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Presentation on theme: "Canadian Experience Iron and Steel Sector Prepared for the CEC North American Strategy for Catalyzing Cooperation on Dioxins, Furans and HCB Source Control."— Presentation transcript:

1 Canadian Experience Iron and Steel Sector Prepared for the CEC North American Strategy for Catalyzing Cooperation on Dioxins, Furans and HCB Source Control Workshop April 17-18, 2008 Leon, Guanajuato, Mexico

2        Edmonton Regina Selkirk Cambridge Whitby L’Orignal Contrecoeur (2) Sorel-Tracy    Nanticoke Sault Ste. Marie Hamilton (3 - see inset) Legend:  Steel recycling mill = 8  Conventional primary iron and steel mill = 4 Direct reduced iron and steel mill = 1  Ilmenite smelter = 1 Iron, Steel and Ilmenite Smelting Sector 2006 Sector Statistics: Production: 15.4 million tonnes Employment: ~21,300 direct jobs Exports: $5.8 billion Number of facilities: 14 Total Sector Emissions (2006, NPRI): 2.9 grams I-TEQ/year 1400 grams HCB/year Typical exhaust gas concentrations: ~14 – 132 pg I-TEQ/Rm 3    Hamilton

3 DRAFT – Page 3 – April 27, 2015 Overview of the Canadian Sector Ilmenite smelter – no known sources of dioxins, furans and HCB –Produces steel using the basic oxygen process from iron obtained as by-product of TiO 2 production from ilmenite One sinter plant at one integrated steel mill –Formerly processed steel mill residuals; currently not operating Direct reduced ironmaking facility uses electric arc furnace to produce steel from direct reduced iron (DRI) pellets –Treated along with electric arc furnaces serving non-integrated mills One integrated mill also runs a very large electric arc furnace (also treated along with EAFs at non-integrated mills) Focus of Canadian efforts now is on the 10 facilities using electric arc furnaces for steelmaking Facility EAF capacities range between 290-1,633 kilotonnes steel per annum; overall EAF subsector capacity utilization ~90% In 2006 and 2007, EAF steel production was ~6.4 megatonnes or 41% of sector total

4 DRAFT – Page 4 – April 27, 2015 Canadian Approach Dioxins/furans from steel manufacturing electric arc furnaces (EAFs) were identified as a priority source for action Established Canada-wide Standards for Dioxins/Furans from Steel manufacturing EAFs in 2003 (Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME)) Emission limit values (ELVs) as stack concentrations, with timeframe for achievement by existing sources –Developed based on consideration of Best Available Techniques (BAT) –New: 100 pg ITEQ/Rm 3 –Existing: 150 pg ITEQ/Rm 3 by pg ITEQ/Rm 3 by 2010 –R = reference conditions: For these sources, 25 °C, 1 atm, dry, at operating oxygen levels in the exhaust stream. –Annual testing recommended. –Required the development of a Pollution Prevention Strategy ▪Developed taking into account Best Environmental Practices –Most provinces are implementing the CWS limits via site-specific facility operating permits or certificates of approval. Secondary steel mills are also required to report annual releases of dioxins/furans to Environment Canada’s National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI)

5 DRAFT – Page 5 – April 27, 2015 Scope of Pollution Prevention Strategies Steel Manufacturing Electric Arc Furnaces Best Environmental Practices considered include: –Opportunities for improved control and release reductions of particulate matter; –Combustion chemistry of the EAF process; –Feasibility of applying existing/emerging pollution prevention/control techniques (e.g., catalytic oxidation, containment of fugitive emissions, best management practices for operations and maintenance, etc.); –Reduction of mercury sources and emissions through the Mercury CWS development process; –Cross-media transfers and management of pollutants; –Emissions of greenhouse gases; –Resource utilization; and –Energy efficiency

6 DRAFT – Page 6 – April 27, 2015 Implementation Progress to Date Steel Manufacturing Electric Arc Furnaces (EAFs) –Currently 10 EAFs operating in Canada –Test results available for 6 as shown below Facility 2003 D/F Emissions (pg/Rm 3 ) 2004 D/F Emissions (pg/Rm 3 ) 2005 D/F Emissions (pg/Rm 3 ) 2006 D/F Emissions (pg/Rm 3 ) Meets 2006 CWS standard (150 pg/Rm 3 ) Meets 2010 CWS standard (100 pg/Rm 3 ) Mill A N/AYes Mill BN/A N/AYes Mill C1284.0N/A131.6N/AYesNo Mill D N/AYes Mill EN/A N/AYes Mill FN/A Yes New and Modified Furnaces: Dioxin and furans emissions shall be less than 100 pg ITEQ/Rm3 from any new or modified steel manufacturing EAF. Existing Furnaces: Phase 1: Dioxin and furans emissions shall be less than 150 pg ITEQ/ Rm3 at all existing steel manufacturing EAFs by Phase 2: Dioxins and furans emissions shall be less than 100 pg ITEQ/Rm3 at all existing steel manufacturing EAFs by 2010.

7 DRAFT – Page 7 – April 27, 2015 Canadian Steel Manufacturing Electric Arc Furnace Dioxin and Furan Emissions ( )

8 DRAFT – Page 8 – April 27, 2015 Steel EAF D/F Trend: 2000 to 2006

9 DRAFT – Page 9 – April 27, 2015 Effectiveness/ Lessons Learned Implementation of the CWS for D/F from steel EAFs has been effective –Reductions in annual emissions have been observed (~74% since 2000) Implementation has lead to: –Better characterization of releases –Improved emission controls Lessons learned –Specific emission limit value with implementation timeline, together with monitoring and reporting requirements are a useful combination of measures

10 DRAFT – Page 10 – April 27, 2015 For more information Ken Smith Head, Steel and Organic By-product Unit Mining and Processing, Environment Canada Tel: (819)


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