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Learning Outcomes Assessment January 20, 2015 2:00-3:30 pm Low-Stakes Assignments as Direct Measures of Student Learning Index #5999.

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Presentation on theme: "Learning Outcomes Assessment January 20, 2015 2:00-3:30 pm Low-Stakes Assignments as Direct Measures of Student Learning Index #5999."— Presentation transcript:

1 Learning Outcomes Assessment January 20, 2015 2:00-3:30 pm Low-Stakes Assignments as Direct Measures of Student Learning Index #5999

2 Learning Outcomes Assessment Resources Instructional Media Amy Chase Martin, Director David Kaus, Instructional Designer Karen Evans, Instructional Technologist Online Resources Hccfacultysupport.wikispaces.com Learning Outcomes Assessment Chandra Bowden, Research Associate Danielle D. Brown, Associate Director Susan Hellenbrand, Research Analyst Visit LOA on myHCCmyHCC Tea & Chat Wednesday, January 28 th @ 4:00 pm Wednesday, February 25 th @ 9:30 pm Thursday, March 26 th @ 3:00 pm Monday, April 27 th @ 2:00 pm 2

3 Learning Outcomes Assessment 3 Overview Workshop goals MSCHE Standard #14, Definitions Low-Stakes Assignments and Grading Procedures Incorporating Technology References and Recommended Reading Discussion/Questions

4 Learning Outcomes Assessment Workshop Goals 1.Describe how low stakes assignments (and grading) provide meaningful, useful, efficient, and sustainable measures of student learning. Meaningful – can be used to make inferences about student learning. Useful – can be used to make changes in instruction. Efficient – makes good use of time, effort, and resources. Sustainable – can be and is likely to be repeated. 4

5 Learning Outcomes Assessment 5 Workshop Goals 2.Discuss how examples of low stakes assignments can be used to document student learning. Quantifying informal assessments Assessment data not always = grades 3.Provide demonstrations of low stakes assignments that are both low- and high-tech.

6 Learning Outcomes Assessment MSCHE Standard #14: Assessment of Student Learning Assessment of student learning demonstrates that, at graduation, or other appropriate points, the institution’s students have knowledge, skills, and competencies consistent with institutional and appropriate higher education goals. assessing achievement of goals. using results of assessments to improve programs, services, teaching and learning and inform planning and resource allocation. Middle States Commission on Higher Education (2006). Characteristics of Excellence in Higher Education: Requirements of Affiliation and Standards for Accreditation. Philadelphia: Middle States Commission on Higher Education. 6

7 Learning Outcomes Assessment 7 Definitions Low-Stakes Assignments do not heavily impact students’ grades or other educational outcomes. vs. high-stakes that have important benefits for passing and disadvantages for failing. provides students/instructors with indication of student learning. Direct Measures of Student Learning Evidence of student’s command of specific topic, goal, or objective. Examples: homework, exams, quizzes, reports, papers, projects, performances, discussion participation, rubric scoring.

8 Learning Outcomes Assessment 8 Trends in Direct Assessments Tend to be high-stakes assignments? Written/oral assignments Course embedded rubric assignments Oral assignments graded w/rubric Cases graded w/rubric Major field test Common school exams Teamwork evaluation What about low-stakes (course-embedded) assignments? Kelley, C., Pingsheng, T., & Choi, B. (2010). A review of Assessment of student learning programs at AACSB schools: A dean’s perspective. Journal of Education for Business, 85, 299-306.

9 Learning Outcomes Assessment Low-Stakes Assignments and Grading Procedures 9

10 Learning Outcomes Assessment Minute-Paper Very short, in-class writing activity. Has been used to provide instructors with feedback about students’ perceptions of learning. What was the most important concept you learned in class today? What was the ‘muddiest’ or most confusing concept covered in today’s class? Can assess student learning of specific concepts. Did you see any relationships between today’s topic and other topics previously covered in this course? What was discussed in class today that seemed to connect with what you’re currently learning or previously learned in other course(s)? 10 Svinicki, M. D. & McKeachie, W. J. (2014). McKeachie’s Teaching Tips: Strategies, Research, and Theory for College and University Teachers. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

11 Learning Outcomes Assessment Minute-Paper Provide quick, informal feedback to students that translate into quantifiable measures of student learning ✗ does not meet expectations ✓ -partially meets expectations ✓ meets expectations ✓ +exceed expectations Connect minute papers to course objectives (see handout). 11

12 Learning Outcomes Assessment Group Discussion & Think-Pair-Share Group discussion Discuss goal/s of discussion Assign minute taker Quantify student learning based on minutes Meets learning objectives = 100% Doesn’t meets objectives = 50% Think-Pair-Share Think about a question. Form pairs and share responses. Pairs then share with the whole class. Smith, M. K., Wood, W.B, Krauter, K., & Knight, J.K. (2011). Combining peer discussion with instructor explanation increases student learning from in-class concept questions. CBE—Life Sciences Education, 10, 55–63. Svinicki, M. D. & McKeachie, W. J. (2014). McKeachie’s Teaching Tips: Strategies, Research, and Theory for College and University Teachers. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. 12

13 Learning Outcomes Assessment 13 Low-Stakes Grading Procedures Not all assessment data needs to contribute to student grades. This type of assessment data can also be grouped Example Assess think-pair-share with a dichotomous checklist “Student pair understands concept” vs. “Student pair doesn’t understand concept” Can report % of student pairs that understand/misunderstand concept

14 Learning Outcomes Assessment Checklists Reimer, M. U. (2009). Assessing individual performance in the college band. Research & Issues in Music Education, 7(1), http://www.stthomas.edu/rimeonline/vol7/reimer.htm. http://www.stthomas.edu/rimeonline/vol7/reimer.htm 14

15 Learning Outcomes Assessment Incorporating Technology 15

16 Have you taught using clickers? A.True B.False Clickers Student response systems Assess student learning during classroom discussion or lecture. Bruff, D. (2009). Teaching with Classroom Response Systems: Creating Active Learning Environments. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Learning Outcomes Assessment

17 According to MSCHE, which is an example of an assignment that directly measures student learning? A.Course grade B.IDEA survey responses C.Unit quizzes D.All of the above Clickers: Demonstration Learning Outcomes Assessment

18 Clickers: Applications Use with multiple choice questions Can convert open-ended questions to a series of MC questions Anonymous or registered Anonymous recommended for sensitive topics or when openness is desired Registered recommended for assessment of student learning Bruff, D. (2009). Teaching with Classroom Response Systems: Creating Active Learning Environments. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. 18

19 Learning Outcomes Assessment Assessment with Clickers Clickers will be used differently for SLO purposes than for other purposes (e.g., formative assessment). Ask questions about basic understanding E.g., vocabulary, facts, recall, identification Use at points where content is expected to mastered. E.g., review session for homework, project, or exam; end of lecture Can be used in advanced ways E.g., in-class quiz, higher order understanding (see Bruff, 2009) Bruff, D. (2009). Teaching with Classroom Response Systems: Creating Active Learning Environments. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. 19

20 Of the questions posed below, identify the one that would be appropriate to ask students as registered clicker users rather than anonymous clicker users. A.Do you know someone with a condition diagnosed by a licensed clinical psychologist? (Course: Abnormal Psychology) B.Which of the following was a significant factor in determining the degree of obedience in Milgram's series of experiments? (Course: General Psychology) C.To what degree are you satisfied with your learning in this course? D.In your opinion, how prepared is HCC for the next MSCHE site visit? Learning Outcomes Assessment

21 Online Response Aggregators Can provide qualitative assessment data. Answer Garden Demo - http://answergarden.ch/view/133784http://answergarden.ch/view/133784 Wordle Demo - http://www.wordle.net/http://www.wordle.net/ Socrative - http://b.socrative.com/login/student/http://b.socrative.com/login/student/ Room 8906a738 21

22 Learning Outcomes Assessment SMART Board & Brightlink Can project from a computer and manipulate live on the board Manipulation = writing, moving Interactive whiteboards can be used to assess complex knowledge Capture in-class learning activities Example: In ENGL-121, student groups can edit writing live 22

23 Learning Outcomes Assessment Brightlink: Demonstration Compute the standard deviation for the sample of essay grades below. Essay Student A80 Student B75 Student C70 Student D95 Student E80 23

24 Learning Outcomes Assessment Collaborative Technology Canvas Can help collect qualitative data Can be quantified if necessary via rubric or other measure Asynchronous discussions Student minutes from in-class group discussions Social Media Microblogs (i.e., tweets) Facebook Wikis Assess student writing in parts. Ebner, M., Lienhardt, C., Rohs, M., & Meyer, I. (2009). Microblogs in higher education – a chance to facilitate informal and process-oriented learning? Computers & Education, 55, 92–100. 24

25 Learning Outcomes Assessment References & Recommended Reading Bruff, D. (2009). Teaching with Classroom Response Systems: Creating Active Learning Environments. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Ebner, M., Lienhardt, C., Rohs, M., & Meyer, I. (2009). Microblogs in higher education – a chance to facilitate informal and process-oriented learning? Computers & Education, 55, 92–100. Kelley, C., Pingsheng, T., & Choi, B. (2010). A review of Assessment of student learning programs at AACSB schools: A dean’s perspective. Journal of Education for Business, 85, 299-306. Middle States Commission on Higher Education (2006). Characteristics of Excellence in Higher Education: Requirements of Affiliation and Standards for Accreditation. Philadelphia: Middle States Commission on Higher Education. Reimer, M. U. (2009). Assessing individual performance in the college band. Research & Issues in Music Education, 7(1), http://www.stthomas.edu/rimeonline/vol7/reimer.htm.http://www.stthomas.edu/rimeonline/vol7/reimer.htm Smith, M. K., Wood, W.B, Krauter, K., & Knight, J.K. (2011). Combining peer discussion with instructor explanation increases student learning from in-class concept questions. CBE— Life Sciences Education, 10, 55–63. Svinicki, M. D. & McKeachie, W. J. (2014). McKeachie’s Teaching Tips: Strategies, Research, and Theory for College and University Teachers. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. 25

26 Learning Outcomes Assessment Low-stakes assignments and grading are one of many options available for assessing student learning. Discussion/Questions 26

27 Learning Outcomes Assessment Thank you! Contact Information: Danielle D. Brown – dbrown3@howardcc.edu Amy Chase Martin – acmartin@howardcc.edu Faculty Assistance – IMFacultyLab@howardcc.edu dbrown3@howardcc.edu acmartin@howardcc.edu IMFacultyLab@howardcc.edu


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