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Presentational technologies …for classroom interaction.

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Presentation on theme: "Presentational technologies …for classroom interaction."— Presentation transcript:

1 Presentational technologies …for classroom interaction

2 Problems with powerpoint? 1.

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6 Observation Participation Guided participation Guided conversation Conversation Exposition Reflection

7 Observation Participation Guided participation Guided conversation Conversation Exposition Reflection language

8 Observation Participation Guided participation Guided conversation Conversation Exposition Reflection language representation

9 Observation Participation Guided participation Guided conversation Conversation Exposition Reflection language re-presentation literacy

10 Observation Participation Guided participation Guided conversation Conversation Exposition Reflection

11 Observation Participation Guided participation Guided conversation Conversation Exposition Reflection

12 Observation Participation Guided participation Guided conversation Conversation Exposition Reflection

13 Observation Participation Guided participation Guided conversation Conversation Exposition Reflection

14 Observation Participation Guided participation Guided conversation Conversation Exposition Reflection

15 Observation Participation Guided participation Guided conversation Conversation Exposition Reflection

16 Observation Participation Guided participation Guided conversation Conversation Exposition Reflection

17 Observation Participation Guided participation Guided conversation Conversation Exposition Reflection “Interactive investment” effort index

18 Observation Participation Guided participation Guided conversation Conversation Exposition Reflection un-situated situated

19 Observation Participation Guided participation Guided conversation Conversation Exposition Reflection un-situated and therefore invite re-presentations

20 Conversation, exposition and reflection do not need (re-)presentation… (linked)

21 …But it helps a lot if they do

22 …because talk alone (out of referential context) is limited… limited for processes/activities (riding a bike) insufficiently vivid transient

23 How do re-presentations support talk? TaxonomisingResourcing the non-narrative nature of teaching talk DenotationMaking visible the literal meaning/reference of talk ConnotationMaking visible the figural intent of talk ReificationMaking the abstract concrete (diagrams) FreezingMaking a dynamic processes visible Attention managementAllowing inspection and reflection

24 How do representations support interaction? 1. Making conversation visible 2. Prompting individual contributions 3. Demanding individual contributions 4. Affording actions

25 1. Making conversation visible

26 2. Prompting individual contributions (prolepsis)

27 3. Demanding individual contributions Eg. Game show Presenter: A powerpoing addon

28 4. Affording actions The interactive whiteboard Tablet communication systems Formative assessment and tracking systems

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30 Draper and Brown, 2004, JCAL Increasing interactivity in lectures using an electronic voting system Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary Science, Biology, Psychology, Computing Science, Statistics, and Philosophy Departments recruited. Varying size classes. Survey: % only will respond to questions from lecturers 0.5 – 7.8% if by “hands up” method Evaluation: Observation of lectures (with and without handset use). Informal discussions with students who had used the handsets. Use of the handsets to evaluate the use of the handsets i.e. simple questionnaires administered on the spot with the equipment. Written open-ended comments from students. Paper questionnaires. Discussions with lecturers before and after their handset use. Written feedback from lecturers after their handset use.

31 Some reasons for EVS?

32 Assessment Formative feedback on learning Formative feedback for the teacher Peer assessment (class presentations) Community mutual awareness building Experiments with human responses Discussion (MCQ > vote > discuss)

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35 Some benefits of using handsets to vote in lectures 1. Using handsets is fun and breaks up the lecture. 2. Makes lectures more interactive/interesting and involves the whole class. 3. I like contributing opinion to the lecture and it lets me see what others think about it too. 4. The anonymity allows students to answer without embarrassing themselves. 5. Gives me an idea of how I am doing in relation to the rest of the class. 6. Checks whether you are understanding it as well as you think you are. 7. Allows problem areas to be identified. 8. Lecturers can change what they do depending on what students are finding difficult. 9. Gives a measure of how well the lecturer is putting the ideas across.

36 Some problems with using the handsets in lectures 1. Setting up and use of handsets takes up too much time in lectures. 2. Can distract from the learning point entirely. 3. Sometimes it is not clear what I am supposed to be voting for. 4. Main focus of lecture seems to be on handset use and not on course content. 5. The questions sometimes seem to be for the benefit of the lecturer and future students and not us. 6. Annoying students who persist in pressing their buttons and cause problems for people trying to make an initial vote. 7. Not completely anonymous in some situations. 8. Some students could vote randomly and mislead the lecturer. 9. Sometimes the lecturer seems to be asking questions just for the sake of it.

37 A fuller review


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