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The War Ends Setting the Scene Chapter 17 section 5 Pg.505.

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Presentation on theme: "The War Ends Setting the Scene Chapter 17 section 5 Pg.505."— Presentation transcript:

1 The War Ends Setting the Scene Chapter 17 section 5 Pg.505

2 The War Ends Setting the Scene Chapter 17 section 5 Pg.505 In 1864, Lincoln appointed General Ulysses S. Grant as the top general or commander-in-chief of the Union (US) army. He chose grant because Grant seemed to find a solution for every problem the troops encountered. Grant had a “never-say-die” attitude.

3 The War Ends Setting the Scene Pg.505 Grant was good at finding solutions to problems the army faced. He strung telegraph wires behind the troops as he advanced farther and farther into the South to communicate with the other generals, Washington D.C., and supply lines in the North. Chapter 17 section 5

4 The Fall of Vicksburg Chapter 17 section 5

5 The Fall of Vicksburg Chapter 17 section 5

6 The Fall of Vicksburg Vicksburg, Mississippi was located high up on a cliff overlooking the Mississippi River. It was a great defensive position. At first, the Union could do nothing to capture Vicksburg from the west. Chapter 17 section 5

7 The Fall of Vicksburg Since there’s a solution to every problem for General Grant, he moved south and marched inland to capture Jackson, Mississippi so that he could attack Vicksburg from behind. Chapter 17 section 5

8 The Fall of Vicksburg Chapter 17 section 5

9 The Fall of Vicksburg Chapter 17 section 5 After a 6 week siege (surrounding Vicksburg and cutting off supplies), the Union finally captured the city and had complete control of the Mississippi River.

10 The Fall of Vicksburg Chapter 17 section 5

11 The Fall of Vicksburg Chapter 17 section 5

12 Union Victory at Gettysburg Chapter 17 section 5

13 Union Victory at Gettysburg After Confederate victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, General Lee again hoped to score a Confederate victory in the North, this time at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. If it was successful, he might be able to head south and capture Washington D.C. Chapter 17 section 5

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15 Union Victory at Gettysburg On day 1 of the battle, the Confederates pushed the Union army out of the town of Gettysburg and back to high ground called Cemetery Ridge. Gettysburg Chapter 17 section 5

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17 Union Victory at Gettysburg On day 2 of the battle, the Confederates attacked both sides of the Union lines on Cemetery Ridge, but the Union was able to hold on and keep the high ground. Chapter 17 section 5

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19 Union Victory at Gettysburg Chapter 17 section 5

20 Union Victory at Gettysburg On day 3 of the battle, the Confederates tried to attack the center of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge with a 15,000 man army, hoping to split the Union army in two. This was known as Pickett’s Charge. The Confederates were unsuccessful and lost many soldiers. General Lee blamed himself for the failure. PICKETT’S CHARGE Chapter 17 section 5

21 Union Victory at Gettysburg Pickett’s Charge

22 Union Victory at Gettysburg

23 The victories at Vicksburg and Gettysburg were turning points in the war. After these Confederate loses, the South was weakened and could only try to defend their territory. They lost so many soldiers that they were not strong enough to attack the North again. Chapter 17 section 5

24 The Gettysburg Address Chapter 17 section 5

25 The Gettysburg Address Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not hallow this ground. The brave men living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of their devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain -- that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the people, and for the people, shall not perish from the earth. Chapter 17 section 5

26 The Gettysburg Address Chapter 17 section 5

27 Grant’s Plan for TOTAL WAR! Chapter 17 section 5

28 Grant’s Plan for TOTAL WAR! I can’t spare this man. He fights. As we read in the introduction, because of his great success in the West, Lincoln appointed General Grant as commander of the whole Union army in Ulysses S. Grant Chapter 17 section 5

29 Grant’s Plan for TOTAL WAR! Ulysses S. Grant TOTAL WAR! Grant’s plan for TOTAL WAR was a plan to end the South’s ability to fight. To do this, he ordered the Union Generals to destroy crops, equipment, houses, government buildings, railroads, and anything they find that might be useful to the enemy as they capture new land in the South. Chapter 17 section 5

30 Grant’s Plan for TOTAL WAR! General Philip Sheridan TOTAL WAR! General William Tecumseh Sherman Chapter 17 section 5

31 Sheridan in the Shenandoah Chapter 17 section 5

32 Sheridan in the Shenandoah General Philip Sheridan TOTAL WAR! General U.S. Grant Yes sir! “Leave nothing to invite the enemy to return. Destroy whatever cannot be consumed. Let the valley be left so that crows flying over it will have to carry their rations [food] with them.” Chapter 17 section 5

33 Sheridan in the Shenandoah General Philip Sheridan TOTAL WAR! General Sheridan did exactly as Grant told him to in a series of battles in the Shenandoah Valley including: - The Battle of Front Royal / Guard Hill- The Battle of Berryhill - The Battle of Summit Point- The Battle of Winchester - The Battle of Smithfield Crossing- The Battle of Fisher’s Hill - The Battle of Martinsburg- The Battle of Tom’s Brook - The Battle of Cedar Creek Chapter 17 section 5

34 Sherman’s March to the Sea Chapter 17 section 5

35 Sherman’s March to the Sea Chapter 17 section 5

36 Sherman’s March to the Sea General William Tecumseh Sherman General Sherman did exactly as Grant told him to as he marched through Augusta, Georgia, Atlanta, Georgia and down to Savannah, Georgia on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. Sherman and his troops destroyed everything in their path. TOTAL WAR! Chapter 17 section 5

37 Election of 1864 Abraham Lincoln Republican - win the war, put the Union back together - end slavery in the South George C. McClellan Democrat - end the war immediately - make peace with the South - allow the South to keep slavery Chapter 17 section 5

38 Lincoln is Reelected Chapter 17 section 5

39 Lincoln is Reelected Chapter 17 section 5

40 Lincoln is Reelected Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address Chapter 17 section 5

41 The Civil War Ends The Battle of the Wilderness Chapter 17 section 5

42 The Civil War Ends The Battle of Spotsylvania Chapter 17 section 5

43 The Civil War Ends The Battle of Cold Harbor Chapter 17 section 5

44 The Civil War Ends Siege of Petersburg Chapter 17 section 5

45 The Civil War Ends The Fall of Richmond, Virginia Chapter 17 section 5

46 The Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia Chapter 17 section 5

47 Chapter 17 section 5 The Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia

48 Chapter 17 section 5 The Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia

49 The terms of surrender: - Confederate soldiers have to turn over their rifles, but officers can keep their pistols. - Soldiers who had horses could keep them. - Confederate soldiers will be allowed to return to his home without being disturbed by the army. “The war is over. The rebels are our countrymen again.” Chapter 17 section 5 The Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia


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