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Invocation to “The Odyssey”. 1 / 2. 3. 4. 1 / 2. 3. 4. Sing in me, Muse, and through me tell the story of that man skilled in all ways of contending,°

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Presentation on theme: "Invocation to “The Odyssey”. 1 / 2. 3. 4. 1 / 2. 3. 4. Sing in me, Muse, and through me tell the story of that man skilled in all ways of contending,°"— Presentation transcript:

1 Invocation to “The Odyssey”

2 1 / / Sing in me, Muse, and through me tell the story of that man skilled in all ways of contending,° the wanderer, harried for years on end, after he plundered the stronghold on the proud height of Troy. He saw the townlands and learned the minds of many distant men, and weathered many bitter nights and days in his deep heart at sea, while he fought only to save his life, to bring his shipmates home. But not by will nor valor could he save them, for their own recklessness destroyed them all— children and fools, they killed and feasted on the cattle of Lord Helios, the Sun, and he who moves all day through heaven took from their eyes the dawn of their return. Of these adventures, Muse, daughter of Zeus, tell us in our time, lift the great song again. Begin when all the rest who left behind them headlong death in battle or at sea had long ago returned, while he alone still hungered for home and wife. Her ladyship Calypso clung to him in her sea-hollowed caves— a nymph, immortal and most beautiful, who craved him for her own. And when long years and seasons wheeling brought around that point of time ordained for him to make his passage homeward, trials and dangers, even so, attended him even in Ithaca, near those he loved. Yet all the gods had pitied Lord Odysseus, all but Poseidon, raging cold and rough against the brave king till he came ashore at last on his own land…. (from Book 1)

3 Vocabulary In section 1, highlight the word that describes any of a number of sister goddesses. (Originally given as Aoede (song), Melete (meditation), and Mneme (memory), but latterly and more commonly as the nine daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne who presided over various arts: Calliope (epic poetry), Clio (history), Erato (lyric poetry), Euterpe (music), Melpomene (tragedy), Polyhymnia (religious music), Terpsichore (dance), Thalia (comedy), and Urania (astronomy); identified by the Romans with the Camenae.) In section 1, highlight the verb that means engaging in a competition or campaign in order to win or achieve. In section 1, highlight the verb that describes being harassed, annoyed as if by repeated attacks. In section 2, highlight the noun meaning boldness or determination in facing great danger. In section 3, highlight the noun that describes one of a numerous class of lesser deities of mythology, conceived of as beautiful maidens inhabiting the sea, rivers, woods, trees, mountains, meadows, etc. In section 4, highlight the word that describes the passing of the years and seasons. In section 4, highlight the name of the ancient Greek god of the sea.

4 1 / / Sing in me, Muse, and through me tell the story of that man skilled in all ways of contending,° the wanderer, harried for years on end, after he plundered the stronghold on the proud height of Troy. He saw the townlands and learned the minds of many distant men, and weathered many bitter nights and days in his deep heart at sea, while he fought only to save his life, to bring his shipmates home. But not by will nor valor could he save them, for their own recklessness destroyed them all— children and fools, they killed and feasted on the cattle of Lord Helios, the Sun, and he who moves all day through heaven took from their eyes the dawn of their return. Of these adventures, Muse, daughter of Zeus, tell us in our time, lift the great song again. Begin when all the rest who left behind them headlong death in battle or at sea had long ago returned, while he alone still hungered for home and wife. Her ladyship Calypso clung to him in her sea-hollowed caves— a nymph, immortal and most beautiful, who craved him for her own. And when long years and seasons wheeling brought around that point of time ordained for him to make his passage homeward, trials and dangers, even so, attended him even in Ithaca, near those he loved. Yet all the gods had pitied Lord Odysseus, all but Poseidon, raging cold and rough against the brave king till he came ashore at last on his own land…. (from Book 1)

5 Summary In section 1, highlight how “that man” is described. In section 1, highlight what he plundered that caused him to become a wanderer for years. In the first part of section 2, highlight the verbs that describe what he did during his wandering. In section 2, highlight what recklessness destroyed his shipmates. In section 3, highlight when the great song will begin. In section 3, highlight what Calypso, the nymph craves In section 4, highlight what he faced even though he was ordained to make his way homeward. In section 4, highlight how Poseidon showed his lack of pity for Lord Odysseus.

6 1 / / Sing in me, Muse, and through me tell the story of that man skilled in all ways of contending,° the wanderer, harried for years on end, after he plundered the stronghold on the proud height of Troy. He saw the townlands and learned the minds of many distant men, and weathered many bitter nights and days in his deep heart at sea, while he fought only to save his life, to bring his shipmates home. But not by will nor valor could he save them, for their own recklessness destroyed them all— children and fools, they killed and feasted on the cattle of Lord Helios, the Sun, and he who moves all day through heaven took from their eyes the dawn of their return. Of these adventures, Muse, daughter of Zeus, tell us in our time, lift the great song again. Begin when all the rest who left behind them headlong death in battle or at sea had long ago returned, while he alone still hungered for home and wife. Her ladyship Calypso clung to him in her sea-hollowed caves— a nymph, immortal and most beautiful, who craved him for her own. And when long years and seasons wheeling brought around that point of time ordained for him to make his passage homeward, trials and dangers, even so, attended him even in Ithaca, near those he loved. Yet all the gods had pitied Lord Odysseus, all but Poseidon, raging cold and rough against the brave king till he came ashore at last on his own land…. (from Book 1)

7 Craft In section 1, highlight how the narrator asks the Muse to help him tell the tale. In section 1, highlight the narrator’s foreshadowing of the wanderer’s situation and what has been the apparent cause. In section 2, highlight the line that explains what the narrator gained from the people he met. In section 2, highlight how the narrator describes the crewmen that Odysseus tried to save. In section 2, these men have been 10 years in bloody battle at Troy and are trying to get home, yet the give in to temptation. Highlight the image of food that caused the destruction of the crew. In section 2, highlight the imagery that describes what Lord Helios, the Sun, did to the crew. In section 3, highlight how the narrator calls on the Muse to retell the story. In section 3, highlight the words the narrator uses to describe those who returned home without Odysseus. In section 3, highlight the word that is used to illustrate Odysseus need to return home. In section 3, when we first encounter Calypso in the Odyssey, she is detaining – or entertaining, if you prefer – the hero Odysseus on her private island of Ogygia. Highlight why Odysseus has not departed from her. In section 4, Odysseus was at war for 10 years and traveled home for 10 years. Highlight how the narrator explains the passage of time before he begins his journey home. The Greek gods were very divided concerning the favorite side of the Trojan War. Poseidon happened to be one of the gods in favor of the Trojans. Many of the gods also did not care for Odysseus because his tactical skills often bordered on the unethical, and came across as downright dirty tricks. In section 4, highlight how Poseidon treated Odysseus on his voyage home.

8 1 / / Sing in me, Muse, and through me tell the story of that man skilled in all ways of contending,° the wanderer, harried for years on end, after he plundered the stronghold on the proud height of Troy. He saw the townlands and learned the minds of many distant men, and weathered many bitter nights and days in his deep heart at sea, while he fought only to save his life, to bring his shipmates home. But not by will nor valor could he save them, for their own recklessness destroyed them all— children and fools, they killed and feasted on the cattle of Lord Helios, the Sun, and he who moves all day through heaven took from their eyes the dawn of their return. Of these adventures, Muse, daughter of Zeus, tell us in our time, lift the great song again. Begin when all the rest who left behind them headlong death in battle or at sea had long ago returned, while he alone still hungered for home and wife. Her ladyship Calypso clung to him in her sea-hollowed caves— a nymph, immortal and most beautiful, who craved him for her own. And when long years and seasons wheeling brought around that point of time ordained for him to make his passage homeward, trials and dangers, even so, attended him even in Ithaca, near those he loved. Yet all the gods had pitied Lord Odysseus, all but Poseidon, raging cold and rough against the brave king till he came ashore at last on his own land…. (from Book 1)

9 Write a summary… Write 4 – 6 sentences summarizing the text you’ve just read and highlighted.


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