Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Teacher: Ella Student: Guya Nitzan Six Grade. Washington D.C. Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as D.C., is.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Teacher: Ella Student: Guya Nitzan Six Grade. Washington D.C. Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as D.C., is."— Presentation transcript:

1 Teacher: Ella Student: Guya Nitzan Six Grade

2 Washington D.C. Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as D.C., is the capital of the United States. On July 16, 1790, the United States Congress approved the creation of a permanent national capital as permitted by the U.S. Constitution. The federal district is therefore not a part of any U.S. state.

3 Washington D.C. City map. This map shows the important sites in D.C.

4 Washington D.C. ID Card - Demographics Population In 2007 the U.S. Census Bureau data estimated the District's population at 591,833 residents, continuing a trend of population growth in the city since the 2000 Census, which recorded 572,059 residents. During the workweek, however, the number of commuters from the suburbs into the city swells the District's population by an estimated 71.8%, to a daytime population of over one million people. Ethnic composition In 2007 the population distribution was 55.6% black, 36.3% white, 8.3% Hispanic (of any race), 5% other (including Native Americans, Alaskans, Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders), 3.1% Asian, and 1.6% mixed. Even though they compose the city's largest ethnic group, Washington has a steadily declining black population, due to many African Americans' leaving the city for suburbs. At the same time, the city's Caucasian population has steadily increased, in part due to effects of gentrification in many of Washington's traditionally black neighborhoods. This is evident in a 7.3% decrease in the African-American population, and a 17.8% increase in the Caucasian population since In addition, some African Americans are going to the South in a New Great Migration, because of family ties, increased opportunities and lower cost of living. In 2007, there were an estimated 74,000 foreign immigrants living in Washington, D.C.[20] Major sources of immigration include El Salvador, Vietnam, and Ethiopia, with some concentration of Salvadorans in the Mount Pleasant neighborhood.

5 Washington D.C. ID Card - Religions According to data from 2000, more than half of District residents were identified as Christian; 28% of residents are Catholic, 9.1% are American Baptist, 6.8% are Southern Baptist, 1.3% are Eastern or Oriental Orthodox, and 13% are members of other Christian denominations. Residents who practice Islam make up 10.6% of the population, followers of Judaism compose 4.5%, and 26.8% of residents adhere to other faiths or do not practice a religion

6 Washington D.C. ID Card - Built Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington, "the District", or simply D.C., is the capital of the United States. On July 16, 1790, the United States Congress approved the creation of a permanent national capital as permitted by the U.S. Constitution. The federal district is therefore not a part of any U.S. state. It was formed from land along the Potomac River donated by the states of Maryland and Virginia; however, the Virginia portion was returned by Congress in The new capital city named after George Washington was founded in 1791 to the east of the preexisting port of Georgetown. The City of Washington, Georgetown, and the remaining unincorporated area within the District were consolidated under a single government in 1871, which formed Washington, D.C., as it exists today. The city shares its name with the U.S. state of Washington, located on the country's Pacific coast.

7 Washington D.C. ID Card - Founders It was founded in 1791 and named after President George Washington. "Columbia" in "District of Columbia" refers to Christopher Columbus. Washington, the District of Columbia is not a state, nor is it part of any state. It is a unique "federal district" created specifically to be the seat of government. George Washington chose the site and appointed three commissioners to help prepare for the arrival of the new government in In 1800 the federal government consisted of 131 employees. Pierre Charles L’Enfant designed the city as a bold new capital with sweeping boulevards and ceremonial spaces reminiscent of Paris of his native France. Benjamin Banneker, a self-taught African-American mathematical genius, provided the astronomical calculations for surveying and laying out the city. The full development of Washington as a monumental city, however, did not come until a hundred years later when the McMillan Commission updated its plan to establish the National Mall and monuments that most visitors to Washington now know.

8 Washington D.C. ID Card - Economy Washington has a growing, diversified economy with an increasing percentage of professional and business service jobs. The gross state product of the District in 2010 was $103.3 billion, which would rank it No. 34 compared to the 50 U.S. states. As of June 2011, the Washington Metropolitan Area had an unemployment rate of 6.2%; the second-lowest rate among the 49 largest metro areas in the nation.[102] The District of Columbia itself had an unemployment rate of 9.8% during the same time period. In 2008, the federal government accounted for about 27% of the jobs in Washington, D.C. This is thought to immunize Washington to national economic downturns because the federal government continues operations even during recessions. However, as of January 2007, federal employees in the Washington area comprised only 14% of the total U.S. government workforce. Many organizations such as law firms, independent contractors (both defense and civilian), non-profit organizations, lobbying firms, trade unions, industry trade groups, and professional associations have their headquarters in or near D.C. to be close to the federal government. The District has growing industries not directly related to government, especially in the areas of education, finance, public policy, and scientific research. Georgetown University, George Washington University, Washington Hospital Center, Children's National Medical Center and Howard University are the top five non-government-related employers in the city as of There are five Fortune 1000 companies based in Washington, of which two are also Fortune 500 companies.

9 Washington D.C. ID Card – National Anthem The Star Spangled Banner Lyrics - By Francis Scott Key Oh, say can you see by the dawn's early light What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming? Whose broad stripes and bright stars thru the perilous fight, O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming? And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air, Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there. Oh, say does that star-spangled banner yet wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave? 3. And where is that band who so vauntingly swore That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion, A home and a country should leave us no more! Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps' pollution. No refuge could save the hireling and slave From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave: And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave! 2. On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep, Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes, What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep, As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses? Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam, In full glory reflected now shines in the stream: 'Tis the star-spangled banner! Oh long may it wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave! 4. Oh! thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand Between their loved home and the war's desolation! Blest with victory and peace, may the heav'n rescued land Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation. Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just, And this be our motto: "In God is our trust." And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

10 Washington D.C. Sports Washington is one of 13 cities in the United States with teams from all four major professional men's sports and is home to one major professional women's team. The Washington Wizards (National Basketball Association), the Washington Capitals (National Hockey League), and the Washington Mystics (Women's National Basketball Association), play at the Verizon Center in Chinatown. Nationals Park, which opened in Southeast D.C. in 2008, is home to the Washington Nationals (Major League Baseball). D.C. United (Major League Soccer) plays at RFK Stadium. The Washington Redskins (National Football League) play at nearby FedExField in Landover, Maryland.

11 Washington D.C. Holidays

12 Washington D.C. Holidays - Continued

13 Washington D.C. Holidays - Continued

14 Washington D.C. Tourist Attractions Washington, D.C. is a wonderful place to visit. In addition to the wealth of attractions relating to the government and its history, you can examine Impressionist masterpieces in the National Gallery of Art, experience the beauty of the United States Botanical Gardens' exotic plants and flowers, and learn about the creatures of the African Savannah at the National Zoo. Some highlights: Washington Monument Arlington Cemetery Pentagon Lincoln Memorial Smithsonian Museum And many more…

15 Washington D.C. Food American cuisine is a style of food preparation originating from the United States of America. European colonization of the Americas yielded the introduction of a number of ingredients and cooking styles to the latter. The various styles continued expanding well in to the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many foreign nations; such influx developed a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.


Download ppt "Teacher: Ella Student: Guya Nitzan Six Grade. Washington D.C. Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as D.C., is."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google