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Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman.

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1 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman

2 Chapter 1: Constitutional Democracy  U.S. Government and Politicians in Context  Defining Democracy  Roots of Constitutional Experiment  Constitutional Convention of 1787  To Adopt or Not to Adopt?

3 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Chapter Outline and Learning Objective U.S. Government and Politicians in Context LO 1.1 Use the concept of constitutional democracy to explain U.S. government and politics. Defining Democracy LO 1.2 Differentiate democracy from other forms of government, and identify conditions, values, political processes, and political structures conducive to a successful democracy.

4 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Chapter Outline and Learning Objective The Roots of the American Constitutional Experiment LO 1.3 Show how politics before 1787 shaped the Constitution. Constitutional Convention of 1787 LO 1.4 Assess the important compromises reached by the delegates to the Constitutional Convention of 1787.

5 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Chapter Outline and Learning Objective To Adopt or Not to AdoptTo Adopt or Not to Adopt? LO 1.5 Evaluate the arguments for and against the ratification of the Constitution.

6 U.S. Government and Politicians in Context LO 1.1 Use the concept of constitutional democracy to explain U.S. government and politics. Oldest constitutional democracy in the world 112 elections with peaceful transfer of powers Requires active participation Balance between faith and skepticism Representative politicians LO 1.1 Back to learning objectives Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman

7 Defining Democracy LO 1.2 Differentiate democracy from other forms of government, and identify conditions, values, political processes, and political structures conducive to a successful democracy. Defining Democracy Direct democracy Direct primary Initiative Referendum Recall Representative democracy Constitutionalism Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman LO 1.2 Back to learning objectives

8 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Defining Democracy Democracy as a System of Interacting Values Personal Liberty Individualism Equality of Opportunity Popular Sovereignty Democratic Values in Conflict LO 1.2 Back to learning objectives

9 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Defining Democracy Democracy as a System of Interrelated Political Processes Free and Fair Elections Majority and Plurality Rule Freedom of Expression The Right to Assemble and Protest LO 1.2 Back to learning objectives

10 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Defining Democracy Democracy as a System of Interdependent Political Structures Federalism Separation of Powers Bicameralism Checks and Balances Bill of Rights LO 1.2 Back to learning objectives

11 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Defining Democracy Conditions Favorable for Constitutional Democracy Educational Economic Social Ideological LO 1.2 Back to learning objectives

12 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman LO 1.2 Back to learning objectives

13 Roots of the American Constitutional Experiment LO 1.3 Show how politics before 1787 shaped the Constitution. The Colonial Beginnings 13 original colonies Limited freedom Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman LO 1.3 Back to learning objectives

14 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Roots of the American Constitutional Experiment Toward Unity and Order Resentment mounted 1770s Declaration of Independence Articles of Confederation Annapolis Convention Shays’ Rebellion LO 1.3 Back to learning objectives

15 Constitutional Convention of 1787 LO 1.4 Assess the important compromises reached by the delegates to the Constitutional Convention of The Delegates 74 delegates appointed, 55 arrived, 40 did the work All white male landowners George Washington elected to preside Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman LO 1.4 Back to learning objectives

16 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Constitutional Convention of 1787 Consensus Republican form of government Balanced government with strong national component Change from the Articles was necessary LO 1.4 Back to learning objectives

17 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Constitutional Convention of 1787 Conflict and Compromise Large vs. small states Virginia Plan New Jersey Plan Connecticut Compromise North vs. South Three-fifths compromise LO 1.4 Back to learning objectives

18 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman LO 1.4 Back to learning objectives

19 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman LO 1.4 Back to learning objectives

20 To Adopt or Not to Adopt? LO 1.5 Evaluate the arguments for and against the ratification of the Constitution. Federalists Seaboard and city regions The Federalist written by Hamilton, Madison, Jay Antifederalists Backcountry regions: farmers and relatively poor people Opposed strong central government Opposed lack of Bill of Rights Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman LO 1.5 Back to learning objectives

21 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman LO 1.5 Back to learning objectives

22 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman What does a constitutional democracy require? A.Active participation B.Faith in common human enterprise C.Skepticism of leaders D.All of the above LO 1.1 Back to learning objectives

23 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman What does a constitutional democracy require? A.Active participation B.Faith in common human enterprise C.Skepticism of leaders D.All of the above LO 1.1 Back to learning objectives

24 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Given conditions, which of the following nations would not be a democracy? A.One with widespread poverty B.One with overlapping associations C.One that is very large D.One that has democratic consensus LO 1.2 Back to learning objectives

25 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Given conditions, which of the following nations would not be a democracy? A.One with widespread poverty B.One with overlapping associations C.One that is very large D.One that has democratic consensus LO 1.2 Back to learning objectives

26 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman The Articles of Confederation was _______. A.A strong national government B.The way Britain ruled the colonies C.A loose friendship between the original states D.Made up of a strong president and legislature, but no judiciary LO 1.3 Back to learning objectives

27 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman The Articles of Confederation was _______. A.A strong national government B.The way Britain ruled the colonies C.A loose friendship between the original states D.Made up of a strong president and legislature, but no judiciary LO 1.3 Back to learning objectives

28 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Which compromise was between the North and South? A.Virginia Plan B.New Jersey Plan C.Connecticut Compromise D.Three-fifths Compromise LO 1.4 Back to learning objectives

29 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Which compromise was between the North and South? A.Virginia Plan B.New Jersey Plan C.Connecticut Compromise D.Three-fifths Compromise LO 1.4 Back to learning objectives

30 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman The biggest contribution of the Antifederalists was ____. A.The Federalist B.The Bill of Rights C.New York’s support D.All of the above LO 1.5 Back to learning objectives

31 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman The biggest contribution of the Antifederalists was ____. A.The Federalist B.The Bill of Rights C.New York’s support D.All of the above LO 1.5 Back to learning objectives

32 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Text Credits 24: From “Obama More Popular Abroad Than at Home, Global Image of U.S. Continues to Benefit” July 2010, by Pew Global Attitudes Project. Copyright (c) 2010 by Pew Global Attitudes Project, a project of the Pew Research Center. Reprinted with permission. 32: From Maps.com. Copyright (c) by Maps.com. Reprinted by permission.

33 Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Longman Photo Credits 16: Saul Loeb/AP Photo 18: Jim Young/Reuters/Corbis 19: Corbis Digital Stock 20: Lee Marriner/AP Photo 21: zumawirewestphotos/Newscom 23: Cristobal Herrara/AP Photo 25: M. Spencer Green/AP Photo 26: Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP Photo 29: Bettmann/Corbis 31: Getty Images/Liaison 34: (left) Ian Wagreich/UPI 34: (right) Bettmann/ Corbis 37: Bettmann/Corbis


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