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Using Community-Based Participatory Research in Tobacco Control: Lessons Learned Sharon M. Day, Executive Director, Indigenous Peoples Task Force 1433.

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Presentation on theme: "Using Community-Based Participatory Research in Tobacco Control: Lessons Learned Sharon M. Day, Executive Director, Indigenous Peoples Task Force 1433."— Presentation transcript:

1 Using Community-Based Participatory Research in Tobacco Control: Lessons Learned Sharon M. Day, Executive Director, Indigenous Peoples Task Force 1433 E. Franklin Avenue – Suite 2, Mpls

2 Minnesota Tribes 11 Reservations in Minnesota 7 are Ojibwe 4 are Dakota Tribal people from over a hundred other tribes live in urban areas. Phillips neighborhood has the densest Native population of any city in the U.S.

3 Indigenous Peoples Task Force Waybinagay: Releasing our addictions Minnesota Native Council on Tobacco Tribal Support Center Media Project

4 Why Native Research? We determine what kind of research We own the research It is done on our terms We can show the necessity of Cultural Interventions and Prevention Strategies Designing research appropriate for our community

5 Why Community Participatory Research? Research becomes driven by community Establishes partnerships between community and academics both Native & non-Native Relationships are developed between Researchers and Community folks Community Researchers are integral to the decision making process: methodology; data analysis, and dissemination

6 IPTF Research Projects Native Women, Smoking and Pregnancy Tribal Casino Research Project Waybinagay: Smoking Cessation for Women of Child Bearing Years Research Project

7 Native Women, Smoking and Pregnancy We wanted to understand smoking prevalence among Native Women Community Researchers were young Native women from the Phillips Neighborhood, most were unemployed, with children under the age of five, and most were smokers. Academic Partners were employees of the U of MN & the Minnesota Department of Health

8 Casino Research Project We wanted to understand the best practices regarding smoke free tribal casino’s in the United States and Canada. We interviewed Management at tribally operated casinos’ where there were smoke free spaces. We created a report for Tribal Governments to provide them with the best information available.

9 Skills Developed Community Researchers were trained in: Research methodology Data analysis Photography and Interviewing Techniques Critical Thinking – reviewed Curriculum; and analyzed & organized the photo’s 50% of the women participating in first phase of research continued on with 2 nd phase Dissemination method: created a cultural calendar with facts about the risks of smoking and exposure to second hand smoke

10 Skills Developed Academic Research Team learned: a. To be part of a process b. To participate in the process c. Patience d. Respect Sovereignty of Tribal Governments.

11 Lessons Learned The Importance of community partners local organizers ensured success Respecting Sovereignty Tribal Research Policies; IRB’s, Tribal Council approval Ownership- If the information is gathered on Tribal land, then the tribe has ownership. Flexibility Understanding the History of Native people and the impacts of past practices Necessity of adequate resources


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