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The Constitution: A More Perfect Union the part of government that interprets the laws judicial branch.

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Presentation on theme: "The Constitution: A More Perfect Union the part of government that interprets the laws judicial branch."— Presentation transcript:

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2 The Constitution: A More Perfect Union

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4 the part of government that interprets the laws judicial branch

5 to reject a proposed law or a bill veto

6 the constitutional system that divides power between the national & state governments federalism

7 to formally accuse an official of a crime related to official duties impeach

8 a proposed law bill

9 the system that allows each branch of government to limit the power of other branches checks & balances

10 He is a member of this branch of government. legislative branch

11 having two lawmaking parts bicameral

12 Pennsylvanian’s would elect someone from the 8 th Congressional District to serve where? House of Representatives

13 Only the President has the power to do this. veto

14 President Obama was sworn in by Chief Justice Roberts, a member of this branch. judicial branch

15 This term explains the words “We the People”—that ordinary Americans have the power in our government. popular sovereignty

16 He is a member of this branch of government. executive branch

17 The Constitution is a “living document” because legislators can add these. amendments

18 Any member of the House or Senate can submit a proposal for this. bill

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20 Ideas for Bills… Cyberbullying Cyberbullying Immigration Immigration Animal Rights Animal Rights Gun Control Gun Control Death Penalty Death Penalty

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22 Marking It Up An idea for a bill may come from anybody, however only Members of Congress can introduce a bill in Congress. Bills can be introduced at any time the House is in session. A bill's type must be determined. A private bill affects a specific person or organization rather than the population at large. A public bill is one that affects the general public.

23 Marking It Up An idea for a bill may come from anybody, however only Members of Congress can introduce a bill in Congress. Bills can be introduced at any time the House is in session. A bill's type must be determined. A private bill affects a specific person or organization rather than the population at large. A public bill is one that affects the general public. A bill is a proposed law.

24 Marking It Up An idea for a bill may come from anybody, however only Members of Congress can introduce a bill in Congress. Bills can be introduced at any time the House is in session. A bill's type must be determined. A private bill affects a specific person or organization rather than the population at large. A public bill is one that affects the general public. Why is Members capitalized?

25 Marking It Up An idea for a bill may come from anybody, however only Members of Congress can introduce a bill in Congress. Bills can be introduced at any time the House is in session. A bill's type must be determined. A private bill affects a specific person or organization rather than the population at large. A public bill is one that affects the general public. So a bill really starts in the House of Reps…

26 Marking It Up An idea for a bill may come from anybody, however only Members of Congress can introduce a bill in Congress. Bills can be introduced at any time the House is in session. A bill's type must be determined. A private bill affects a specific person or organization rather than the population at large. A public bill is one that affects the general public. I would like to make a law banning loud cell phone conversations in public places!

27 Marking It Up After the idea for a bill is developed and the text of the bill is written, a Member of Congress must officially introduce the bill in Congress by becoming the bill's sponsor. Representatives usually sponsor bills that are important to them and their constituents. Representatives who sponsor bills will try to gain support for them, in hopes that they will become laws. Two or more sponsors for the same bill are called co-sponsors. What does this word mean?

28 Marking It Up After the idea for a bill is developed and the text of the bill is written, a Member of Congress must officially introduce the bill in Congress by becoming the bill's sponsor. Representatives usually sponsor bills that are important to them and their constituents. Representatives who sponsor bills will try to gain support for them, in hopes that they will become laws. Two or more sponsors for the same bill are called co-sponsors. I predict that…

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30 Example of a Diagram

31 Example of a Game Board

32 Example of a Flow Chart

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34 1) Idea 2) Get a Sponsor 3) Introduced  Referred to a Committee 4) Referred to a Subcommittee 5) Reported (sent to the floor) 6) Debated on the floor 7) Vote on the bill (51%  Senate) 8) Senate has a similar process 9) Enrolled to the President Let’s Review!

35 10. President’ s Four Choices: a)Leaves it on his desk with the Congress in session— after 10 days it becomes law b)Leaves it on his desk with Congress NOT in session— after 10 days it does not become a law—pocket veto c) Veto (reject) d) Sign it into law

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61 3 Branches of Government

62 Checks & Balances

63 Executive Judicial Legislative

64 Checks & Balances can veto bills

65 Checks & Balances can veto bills can override vetoes

66 Checks & Balances can veto bills can override vetoes can nominate Supreme Court justices

67 Checks & Balances can reject treaties that are unconstitutional can veto bills can override vetoes can nominate Supreme Court justices

68 Checks & Balances can reject treaties that are unconstitutional can veto bills can override vetoes can reject laws that are unconstitutional can nominate Supreme Court justices

69 Checks & Balances can reject treaties that are unconstitutional can veto bills approves appointments of Supreme Court justices can override vetoes can reject laws that are unconstitutional can nominate Supreme Court justices

70 Important Amendments to the Constitution Bill of Rights (ratified 1791) 13. Slavery Abolished in the United States (ratified 1865) 15. Right to vote shall not be denied on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude (ratified 1870)

71 10 Most Recent Amendments 18. Alcohol Prohibited in the United States (ratified 1919) 19. Women’s Suffrage (ratified 1920) 20. Presidential & Congressional Terms (ratified 1933) th Amendment Repealed (ratified 1933) 22. Presidential Term Limits (ratified 1951) 23. Washington D.C. gets representation in the Electoral College (ratified 1961) 24. People Cannot Be Taxed at Voting Polls (ratified 1964) 25. Presidential Disability & Succession (ratified 1967) 26. Voting Age Set to 18 Years Old (ratified 1971) 27. Limiting Congressional Pay Increases (ratified 1992)

72 Amending the Constitution Amendment is proposed by 2/3 vote of each house of Congress

73 Amending the Constitution Amendment is proposed by 2/3 vote of each house of Congress Amendment is proposed by a national convention called by Congress at the request of 2/3 of the state legislatures

74 Amending the Constitution Amendment is ratified by ¾ of the state legislatures Amendment is proposed by 2/3 vote of each house of Congress Amendment is proposed by a national convention called by Congress at the request of 2/3 of the state legislatures

75 Amending the Constitution Amendment is ratified by ¾ of the state legislatures Amendment is proposed by 2/3 vote of each house of Congress Amendment is proposed by a national convention called by Congress at the request of 2/3 of the state legislatures Amendment is ratified by ¾ of the state conventions

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77 7 Principles of the Constitution U.S. Constitution Popular Sovereignty RepublicanismFederalism Separation of Powers Checks & Balances Limited Government Individual Rights

78 7 Principles of the Constitution U.S. Constitution Popular Sovereignty A government in which the people rule RepublicanismFederalism Separation of Powers Checks & Balances Limited Government Individual Rights

79 7 Principles of the Constitution U.S. Constitution Popular Sovereignty Republicanism People vote for political representatives Federalism Separation of Powers Checks & Balances Limited Government Individual Rights

80 7 Principles of the Constitution U.S. Constitution Popular Sovereignty RepublicanismFederalism Power divided between federal government & states Separation of Powers Checks & Balances Limited Government Individual Rights

81 7 Principles of the Constitution U.S. Constitution Popular Sovereignty RepublicanismFederalism Separation of Powers No one branch is given all of the powers Checks & Balances Limited Government Individual Rights

82 7 Principles of the Constitution U.S. Constitution Popular Sovereignty RepublicanismFederalism Separation of Powers Checks & Balances Each branch of government can exercise checks, or controls, over the other branches to balance power Limited Government Individual Rights

83 7 Principles of the Constitution U.S. Constitution Popular Sovereignty RepublicanismFederalism Separation of Powers Checks & Balances Limited Government Citizens & leaders must all obey laws Individual Rights

84 7 Principles of the Constitution U.S. Constitution Popular Sovereignty RepublicanismFederalism Separation of Powers Checks & Balances Limited Government Individual Rights Personal liberties & rights


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