Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Raffay Khan “Press Enter to Continue”. Welcome to my, Raffay Khan’s, tour of the Freeport Doctrine which was stated by Stephen Douglas, the nominee at.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Raffay Khan “Press Enter to Continue”. Welcome to my, Raffay Khan’s, tour of the Freeport Doctrine which was stated by Stephen Douglas, the nominee at."— Presentation transcript:

1 Raffay Khan “Press Enter to Continue”

2 Welcome to my, Raffay Khan’s, tour of the Freeport Doctrine which was stated by Stephen Douglas, the nominee at the time for the Illinois senate seat, during a debate with Abraham Lincoln. This tour includes an analysis, background information, significance, and additional information on the topic including the Freeport Doctrine itself. The subsequent Page will be a Home where you can access all the information by clicking the corresponding Use the golden star to return to the home page. “Press Enter to Continue” BOX.

3

4 “The next question propounded to me by Mr. Lincoln is, Can the people of a Territory in any lawful way, against the wishes of any citizen of the United States, exclude slavery from their limits prior to the formation of a State constitution? I answer emphatically, as Mr. Lincoln has heard me answer a hundred times from every stump in Illinois, that in my opinion the people of a Territory can, by lawful means, exclude slavery from their limits prior to the formation of a State constitution. Mr. Lincoln knew that I had answered that question over and over again. He heard me argue the Nebraska bill on that principle all over the State in 1854, in 1855, and in 1856, and he has no excuse for pretending to be in doubt as to my position on that question. It matters not what way the Supreme Court may hereafter decide as to the abstract question whether slavery may or may not go into a Territory under the Constitution, the people have the lawful means to introduce it or exclude it as they please, for the reason that slavery cannot exist a day or an hour anywhere, unless it is supported by local police regulations. Those police regulations can only be established by the local legislature; and if the people are opposed to slavery, they will elect representatives to that body who will by unfriendly legislation effectually prevent the introduction of it into their midst. If, on the contrary, they are for it, their legislation will favor its extension. Hence, no matter what the decision of the Supreme Court may be on that abstract question, still the right of the people to make a Slave Territory or a Free Territory is perfect and complete under the Nebraska bill. I hope Mr. Lincoln deems my answer satisfactory on that point” - Douglas

5 Born April 23, 1813, Brandon, Vermont, U.S He was an well known American Politician and leader of the democratic party A Big Supporter of Popular Sovereignty Won the Illinois state senate Chair against Abraham Lincoln in 1858 He would lose to Lincoln in The Presidential campaign of 1860

6 The Freeport Doctrine was stated by Douglas during the second Lincoln-Douglas debate on August 27 th, The Two Men were competing to see who would claim the seat in the senate for the state of Illinois. Two important events that occurred beforehand were Kansas – Nebraska Act, proposed by Douglas himself, and the Dred Scott Vs. Sanford Case, and both influenced the debates heavily. Douglas’s Kansas – Nebraska Act, which pushed Popular Sovereignty or the ability for the people to make decisions, backfired as anti and pro-slavery settlers rushed to the new territories in other to claim them for their respective side. The Dred Scott Vs Sanford Case concluded with the Supreme court stating that “neither the Congress nor territorial legislatures could prohibit slavery in a territory.”

7 The Freeport Doctrine, in simpler terms, states that a territory could determine whether to allow or not allow slavery based on Popular Sovereignty, where the authority of the government is based on the consent of the people. THE PEOPLE DECIDE – Popular Sovereignty He believed it be a compromise between pro-slavery and anti-slavery positions. Due to this, Southern opposition to Douglas increased as he disregarding the fact that the supreme court stated “neither the Congress nor territorial legislatures could prohibit slavery in a territory.”

8 The Freeport Doctrine was important part of American History as it led up or effected several things in many ways. First of all, Due to it, Stephen Douglas gained harsh opposition from southern pro-slavers as they believed he supported slavery weakly It was a factor of the democratic party splinting up in 1860 with the Northern Democrats nominating Douglas while the Southern broke away and nominated John. C. Breckinridge Due to this, In the election of 1860 the Democratic part was split in two with there votes divided. This Allowed Abraham Lincoln to easily claim victory. If the democratic party never Split, Lincoln might have never become president. How would history be different if Democrat Stephen A. Douglas was elected president in 1860? Would we still have the Civil War? This is why the Freeport Doctrine is a vital part of U.S history

9 It can be associated with other sub-movements such as the Kansas-Nebraska Act, The Dred Scott Vs. Sandford Case, and Douglas attempt to Spread Popular Sovereignty. The Kansas-Nebraska Act, Repealed the Missouri compromise and allowed residents of Kansas and Nebraska to Choose between slavery and anti-slavery. It can be said that the K-N act backfired as it led to conflict between pro- slavers and anti-slavers. The Dred Scott Case concluded with the supreme court stating that the government could not prohibit slavery in a territory. The Freeport Doctrine touched on these issues, pushing Popular Sovereignty, and putting the control in the hands of the people.

10 Douglas, Stephen. "Freeport Doctrine." Facts on File. N.p., Web. Goodwin, H. C. The Lecompton Constitution. Washington: Buell & Blanchard, Printers, Print. "Popular Sovereignty (political Doctrine)." Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia Britannica, n.d. Web. Porterfield, Jason. The Lincoln-Douglas Senatorial Debates of 1858 : A Primary Source Investigation. 1st ed. New York: Rosen Central Primary Sources, Print. Snyder, Robert. "Freeport Doctrine." Seton Hill. N.p., n.d. Web. "Stephen A. Douglas (United States Senator)." Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia Britannica, n.d. Web.


Download ppt "Raffay Khan “Press Enter to Continue”. Welcome to my, Raffay Khan’s, tour of the Freeport Doctrine which was stated by Stephen Douglas, the nominee at."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google