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South & Impending Crisis (1850s) I.Intro II.The South A.Slavery & S. Society B.Why fight? III.Road to War A.Controversies B.Compromise IV.Crises A.Fugitives.

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Presentation on theme: "South & Impending Crisis (1850s) I.Intro II.The South A.Slavery & S. Society B.Why fight? III.Road to War A.Controversies B.Compromise IV.Crises A.Fugitives."— Presentation transcript:

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2 South & Impending Crisis (1850s) I.Intro II.The South A.Slavery & S. Society B.Why fight? III.Road to War A.Controversies B.Compromise IV.Crises A.Fugitives B.Stowe C.Kansas Key Terms Paternalism Small Farmer Model Free Soiler Popular Sovereignty Henry Clay Stephen Douglas Compromise of 1850 Fugitive Slave Law Abolitionists Uncle Tom’s Cabin Kansas/Nebraska Act Bleeding Kansas

3 Slavery & The Bible Various passages were used to justify slavery. –“Curse of Ham”

4 Slavery & History 1.Ancient Greeks & Romans owned slaves. 2.US Constitution protected slavery: –3/5 Compromise –Fugitive Slave Provision

5 Slavery & Social Justification Slaves were like children (family) in need of help. Slaves were provided with food and shelter. “Civilization” and Christianity were brought to people considered heathens. Slaves were treated better than Northern factory workers. Paternalism Virginia Planter's Family by August Köllner, 1845

6 Southern Society (1860) Society Was Very Stratified Great Planters (1% of pop: 20+ slaves) Small Farmers (35-45% of pop: 0-5 slaves = most common) Landless Whites (20-25% of pop) Slaves (35% of pop) About 75% of Southern Whites were NOT slaveholders

7 Virginia: Community Life River

8 Small Farmer Model 1.Large plantation was the social center of life. Why would a Southern white male fight to protect slavery if he didn’t own slaves? 2.Large planters lent small farmers a “helping hand” VERY often. 3.A small farmer’s goal: to become a big planter! The entire system was based on slave labor; at least they weren’t black slaves!

9 Controversy/Concerns After Mexican War Would slavery expand into newly acquired land? What about Texas (border & debt) & California? Some felt slavery in WA DC was embarrassing for the nation A group of slaves passing by the US Capital

10 Different Solutions 1.Free Soilers All new territory should be FREE (prohibit slavery). 2.Popular Sovereignty Allow people who live in new territories for vote and decide themselves. 3.Extend Missouri Compromise line

11 Who Can Develop A Compromise? Henry Clay He failed Stephen Douglas He succeeded

12 Compromise Of California entered Union as a free state 2.Slavery in Utah & New Mexico territories will be decided by popular sovereignty 3.Texas border was settled & their debt was paid 4.The slave trade was outlawed in WA DC (but slavery remained legal) 5.A stricter Fugitive Slave Law Douglas

13 Significance: Compromise Of 1850 Its Impact: It averted war for 10 years.

14 Presidents & The Compromise Zachary Taylor ( ) Millard Filmore ( )

15 Fugitive Slave Law (Part of Compromise of 1850) 1.All runaway slaves had to be returned to their owners. 2.It became illegal to aid runaway slaves. 3.Accused runaways were denied a jury trial; a judge decided their fate. It INFURIATED opponents of slavery & showed slavery was a national problem, not regional.

16 Escaping F rom Slavery

17 Boston’s Park Street Church Hosted many anti- slavery rallies

18 Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852) Harriet Beecher Stowe Her Goal: Show horrors of slavery. Its Impact: It infuriated North AND South National & international best-seller “So, you’re the little lady…”

19 A Slave Family Is Ripped Apart

20 Uncle Tom’s Final Beating

21 Abolitionists Condemned slavery as immoral and called for an immediate end to slavery. Strongest in New England, but still very small in number. The Liberator Publisher William Lloyd Garrison

22 Kansas & Nebraska (Background) Northerners supported a railroad out West Southerners wanted slavery to expand Stephen Douglas wanted to be President; wanted support of North & South!

23 Kansas/Nebraska Act (1854) 1.Organized two new territories: Kansas & Nebraska. Stephen Douglas 2.The Missouri Compromise was repealed. 3.Slavery in Kansas & Nebraska was to be determined by Popular Sovereignty.  Angered many in the North; they feared slavery would expand into new areas!

24 Bleeding Kansas ( ) Supporters & opponents of slavery converged in Kansas. This led to bloodshed between the two groups. Pottawatomie Creek Massacre John Brown

25 South & Impending Crisis (1850s) I.Intro II.The South A.Slavery & S. Society B.Why fight? III.Road to War A.Controversies B.Compromise IV.Crises A.Fugitives B.Stowe C.Kansas Key Terms Paternalism Small Farmer Model Free Soiler Popular Sovereignty Henry Clay Stephen Douglas Compromise of 1850 Fugitive Slave Law Abolitionists Uncle Tom’s Cabin Kansas/Nebraska Act Bleeding Kansas


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