Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Maori and Pakeha relationship and Te Tiriti o Waitangi Part One Maori and Pakeha relationship and Te Tiriti o Waitangi Part One Nina Pelling Maia Maori.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Maori and Pakeha relationship and Te Tiriti o Waitangi Part One Maori and Pakeha relationship and Te Tiriti o Waitangi Part One Nina Pelling Maia Maori."— Presentation transcript:

1 Maori and Pakeha relationship and Te Tiriti o Waitangi Part One Maori and Pakeha relationship and Te Tiriti o Waitangi Part One Nina Pelling Maia Maori Development Centre

2 Activity With the person next to you Recap on what we have covered In class in relation to the Maori World view. Write up on board.

3 Kupe 950 Settlement > 1200 Captain Cook – 1814 Sealers, Timber traders, Whalers, Missionaries Treaty 1840 Abel Tasman 1642 Declaration of Independence 1935

4 Maori social organisation Kinship groups, whanau, hapu and iwi Kaumatua and kuia, male and female elders of the whanau group Hapu: 200 to 300 people, main political unit, controlled defined tribal territory Iwi: largest effective political group. Composed of related hapu from a common ancestor Waka: Largest social grouping of Maori society

5

6

7

8 Imperialism Imperialism in its broad meaning is the imposition of the power of one state over the territories of another, normally by military means, in order to exploit subjugated populations and to extract economic and political advantages (Abercrombie et al 1984)

9 Different expressions of Imperialism Ecological Imperialism: Colonisers transform the landscape to replicate home. Legal Imperialism: The conversion of colonial political power into intrinsically valid and abstract legal principles Cultural Imperialism: The replacing of indigenous spiritual beliefs and cultural values

10 Colonisation Colonisation is the establishment of formal political authority by developed countries (Spain, Britain, France ) usually accompanied by settling white populations in these territories; exploitation of local economic for metropolitian use.

11 What is metropolitan use? Metropolitan use is when a territory is taken under control of another group that is peripherised or marginalised. NZ, Aust and North America colonised by large scale settlement South Africa and Zimbabwe – white rule minority British West Indies, Carribean, India and latin America – governed as colonial possessions.

12 © Unitec New Zealand What is the Treaty of Waitangi ?

13

14 “I say – we really must look after those natives, old chap!”

15 MR BUSBY! We are not happy with what some of your people are doing. Let’s do something about it.

16 What was happening at the time? Petition sent to King of England 1813 The Elizabeth Affair Avengence of Marion du Fresne 1772 Creation of NZ first flag 1834 The Alligator Affair Baron Charles De Thierry

17 rangatira The Declaration of Independence 1835 tanga= independence political leader

18 It was raised with the British flag and given a 21 gun salute by the Alligator It was recognised by King William 1V of Britain. This indicated to the chiefs that Britain recognised the tino rangatiratanga of the chiefs It gave NZ built ships a flag to fly which let their cargo go duty free into foreign ports. Busby arranged for these ships to be registered in the name of the independence tribes of NZ It was also flown on land at the Bay of Islands. After the signing of the TOW the Union Jack took its place.

19 No Maori central government because of strong tribal differences It was acknowledged by the Colonial office Chiefs guaranteed it as a guarantee of their independence It meant a formal treaty with all chiefs would be needed if Britain ever wanted to have NZ as a colony and apply British law. Maori tribes controlled all the resources and power in NZ To survive the early settlers needed the protection and friendships of local tribes In 1835 British recognised the Maori chiefs sovereignty and Independence when it accepted the Declaration of Independence

20 Henry Williams Missionary Peace-maker Translator Interpreter What motivated his translation decisions?

21 Differences in the English version. Article 1 Maori leaders gave the Queen ‘all rights and power of sovereignty’ over their territories. Differences in the Maori version. Article 1 Maori gave the Queen ‘te kawanatanga katoa’. complete governance or government over their lands. Differences in the English version. Article 1 Maori leaders gave the Queen ‘all rights and power of sovereignty’ over their territories.

22 Article 2 Maori version Maori were confirmed and guaranteed “te tino rangatiratanga’ – the unqualified exercise of their chieftainship – over their lands, villages and all their treasures – taonga. English version Maori leaders and Maori collectively and individually, were confirmed in and guaranteed ‘exclusive and undisturbed possession of their lands, estates, forests, fisheries and other properties.

23 Article Three Maori version Recognises the continuing right of Maori as Tangata Whenua to enjoy parallel laws, customs and lifestyle just as British citizens enjoyed their own. English version Individual citizenship rights – also entail a right to equitable outcomes i.e. similar expectations for Maori and non-Maori. Concept of active protection

24 Article Four Maori Version Safeguards the right for Maori to practice their own beliefs and values.

25 The context for Colonisation in Aotearoa NZ The settlement of foreign territories The separation of foreign and indigenous peoples by legal means The growth of racialism (Abercombie et al 1984)

26 Colonisation Colonisation occurs when control is taken by the colonising power from the indigenous peoples. The indigenous peoples then struggle to maintain their own institutions.

27 Identify strategies which promote equitable outcomes for all students –Examine the Treaty of Waitangi as it relates to Education –Discuss key current issues for modern Maori society –Discuss the concept of cultural identity 27 Learning outcomes

28 What did Maori get? An imposed British government, making laws without reference to Treaty or Maori needs. A gradual destruction of Maori authority and social system Minority status Alienation of vast areas of land by confiscation, illegal agreements and transfers of land and resources The destruction of Maori enterprise and decision making

29 Maori Text Maori expectations were: Governor to maintain peace and order Rangatiratanga (absolute control) over their taonga Royal protection The same rights and privileges as all British subjects

30 Rule of law Essential tool of Maori colonisation to marginalise Maori post treaty Extension of hegemony of the West – 0n the same foundation as God in the community. Hegemony impartial and value free. Maori and Pakeha in the short term were supported but reality of British justice worked to isolate Maori from Maori sovereignty movements

31 Native land court established No more than 10 owners, regardless of block size, thus effectively dispossessing all other tribal members who may have been owners The newly designed owners held their land individually not communally as part of trustees for a tribal group. And could deal with it, including selling it as individuals for their own benefit.


Download ppt "Maori and Pakeha relationship and Te Tiriti o Waitangi Part One Maori and Pakeha relationship and Te Tiriti o Waitangi Part One Nina Pelling Maia Maori."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google