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Warm- up  On your own sheet of paper, LIST any and all questions you have about the Sovereignty movement.  You should think of as many questions you.

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Presentation on theme: "Warm- up  On your own sheet of paper, LIST any and all questions you have about the Sovereignty movement.  You should think of as many questions you."— Presentation transcript:

1 Warm- up  On your own sheet of paper, LIST any and all questions you have about the Sovereignty movement.  You should think of as many questions you can and write for the entire 5 minutes.  Discussion

2 The Hawaiian Sovereignty Movement Modern Hawaiian History

3 Queen Lili’uokalani On Tuesday Jan. 17, 1893 – the day that an armed group of businessmen, backed by the U.S. diplomatic representative to Hawaii, 162 Marines and a gunboat, illegally forced Queen Lili'uokalani to give up control of the Hawaiian nation – the queen wrote: Student reads: Queen Lili’uokalani

4 100 Years Later… There is a growing recognition that overthrow was a wrongful act – "an act of war," as President Grover Cleveland described it. People are re-examining the injustices perpetrated against Hawaii's indigenous population and the various ways in which they can be addressed. People are recognizing the inherent right of Native Hawaiians to self-determination

5 Apology = U.S. Acknowledgement 1993 – President Bill Clinton signed Public Law , known as the apology bill. Committed America to a process of reconciliation for their part in the overthrow. In response to Onipa’a (100 year anniversary) the state created Hawaiian Sovereignty Advisory Committee and this was replaced by the Hawaiian Sovereignty Elections Council (HSEC).

6 Confusion… What form would sovereignty take? How would it be achieved? What would it do to the lives of Hawaiians? And what about non- Hawaiians?

7 What do sovereignty supporters agree on? Both the overthrow and annexation were illegal and the U.S. Government is held responsible. ***Sovereignty is the power if the people to exercise their inherent rights through a government of their own choosing.*** Also referred to as self-determination. Some type of redress and restitution is needed for overthrow, loss of land and military occupation since annexation.

8 Education If there is anything that sovereignty advocates agree on, it's that it is just the beginning. "1993 should be an impetus toward learning," says Hayden Burgess. Students reads: Hayden Burgess

9 PAUSE!!!  Turn to you partner and talk for 1 minute about what we just learned.  When first person finished, second person talk for 30 seconds about what first person left out.

10 Ingredients of a Sovereign Nation: 1)Land base 2)Right to determine citizenship 3)Right to self-determination

11 Models: Full Independence The total withdrawal of the U.S. government from Hawaii. Members vision of what this would look like is not firmly in place. A nation within a nation is only the first step in the larger process of decolonization. Ka Pakaukau, a group made up of 12 different pro- sovereignty organizations. Leader: Dr. Kekuni Blaisdell The Institute for the Advancement of Hawaiian Affairs, Head: Hayden Burgess

12 Models: A nation-within-a-nation  Hawaiians would be recognized as a self-governing entity by the federal government, much as Native Americans and Eskimos have been.  Hawaiian nation would have authority over the lands taken from the Hawaiian government in  It would (most likely) be independent of state and county governments but would be subject to federal law.  government would have the power to make laws, collect tax, dispense justice, enter into treaties with other nations and perform a variety of other functions inherent in most sovereign bodies.  Membership in such a nation would not in any way affect one's status as a U.S. or State of Hawaii citizen.  Ka Lahui and Office of Hawaiian Affairs

13 Models: A nation-within-a-nation  The Native Hawaiian Government Reorganization Act of 2007  A bill currently before the United States Congress, commonly known as the Akaka Bill after U.S. Senator Daniel Akaka, who has proposed various forms of this bill since  The Akaka bills proposed between 2000 and the present seek to establish a process for Native Hawaiians to gain federal recognition similar to the recognition that some Native American tribes currently possess.   The House version of the bill (H.R. 505) passed on October 24, 2007[2].

14 PAUSE!!!  Turn to you partner and talk for 1 minute about what we just learned.  When first person finished, second person talk for 30 seconds about what first person left out.

15 Models: Free Association Maintains strong ties with the U.S.Maintains strong ties with the U.S. A compact, or contract, is signed which defines the relationship between the two countries.A compact, or contract, is signed which defines the relationship between the two countries. They would have their own international affairs, membership in the U.N., could negotiate treaties with other countries, and have their own local government.They would have their own international affairs, membership in the U.N., could negotiate treaties with other countries, and have their own local government. The U.S. would provide defense.The U.S. would provide defense.

16 Groups: Hui Na'auao 1991, a number of groups propounding sovereignty joined together under the umbrella organization Hui Na'auao. The stated mandate of Hui Na'auao is to educate people about sovereignty; since the hui's member organizations are so diverse, workshops represent the full spectrum of views. "We have three objectives," says Martin. Student reads: Elizabeth Martin

17 Groups: Variety Hawaiian Kingdom: David Keanu Sai Poka Laenui (Hayden Burgess) Ka Pakaukau: Kekuni Blaisdell Nation of Hawai'I Ka Lahui Office of Hawaiian Affairs Kau`inoa: Hawai'i Maoli, a 501(c)(3) non-profit entity of the Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs. The Office of Hawaiian Affairs' role in this process is as a facilitator only, providing funding and logistical help for this community-driven effort.

18 Free Write!!!  Prompt: Hayden Burgess says:  Unlike most sovereignty proponents, Burgess does not define the issue in terms of Hawaiian blood. "Sovereignty is not a racial issue," he says. "It's an issue of cultural identity, of the relationship of people to the land and culture. We can all take part in restructuring the economy and society to be a community we want to live in and to raise our children in. We need an economy of self-sufficiency, of social responsibility and one that respects the culture of the people."  What do you think?  If a different Hawai’i could be achieved, what model would you prefer and what would the Hawaiian nation you envision look like, be like?

19 Questions?


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